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Archive for the ‘Non-NLM Resources’ Category

NIH Manuscript Submission (NIHMS) System Getting a New Look!

Manuscript Submission System

In January, 2015, the NIH Manuscript Submission (NIHMS) system will be getting a new interface design, which will streamline the login and manuscript submission processes and provide relevant help information on each screen. The NIHMS sign-in routes will be available from the homepage, with options based on a funding agency or signing in through NCBI. The new homepage will also include a graphic overview of the NIHMS process, allowing you to hover over each step for more information or to click on “Learn More” to read the complete overview in the FAQ. Once you are signed in to NIHMS, you will be directed to your Manuscript List. From this page you can manage and track your existing submissions, submit a new manuscript, and search for a record. You can also click on any headings in the information box to expand a topic and read the help text. The initial deposit will still require you to enter a manuscript and journal title, deposit complete manuscript files, and specify funding information and the embargo.

Key updates will include:

  • Assigning an NIHMSID to a record only after files have been uploaded, i.e., at the Check Files step;
  • A streamlined deposit process with clearly defined and explained actions in each step;
  • Requiring the Submitter to open the PDF Receipt to review the uploaded files and confirm that the submission is complete before advancing to the next step;
  • Relevant help information on each page; and
  • Requiring the Reviewer to add funding before approving the initial deposit.

NCCAM Gets New Name!

As part of the omnibus budget measure signed by President Obama in December 2014, Congress changed the name of NCCAM to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, or NCCIH. The change was made to more accurately reflect the Center’s research commitment to studying promising health approaches that are already in use by the American public. Since the Center’s inception, complementary approaches have grown in use to the point that Americans no longer consider them an alternative to medical care. The name change is in keeping with the Center’s existing Congressional mandate and is aligned with the strategic plan currently guiding the Center’s research priorities and public education activities. The mission of the organization will remain unchanged.

Large population-based surveys have found that the use of “alternative medicine,” unproven practices used in place of conventional medicine, is actually rare. By contrast, integrative health care, which can be defined as combining complementary approaches into conventional treatment plans, has grown within care settings across the nation, including hospitals, hospices, and military health facilities. The goal of an integrative approach is to enhance overall health, prevent disease, and to alleviate debilitating symptoms such as pain and stress and anxiety management that often affects patients coping with complex and chronic disease.

The Office of Alternative Medicine (OAM) was established in 1992 within the Office of the Director, NIH, to facilitate the study and evaluation of complementary and alternative medical practices and to disseminate the resulting information to the public. In 1998, NCCAM was established by Congress, elevating OAM to the status of an NIH center. In February 2011, NCCAM released Exploring the Science of Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Third Strategic Plan 2011–2015, which continues to guide NCCIH’s work.

Rural Health Needs Assessment and Program Evaluation

Rural and medically underserved areas often have challenges including both increased health disparities and population health issues combined with limited resources and healthcare providers to help meet these challenges. The use of appropriate program evaluation measures can help to assess what actually works for rural health settings since many evidence-based strategies are based on urban and non-rural populations.

The Rural Assistance Center has recently issued a freely available online guide, which is intended to help an organization:

  • Identify the similarities and differences among rural health research, assessment, and evaluation
  • Discuss common methods, such as surveys and focus groups
  • Provide contacts within the field of rural health research
  • Address the importance of community-based participatory research to rural communities
  • Look at the community health needs assessment (CHNA) requirements for non-profit hospitals and public health
  • Examine the importance of building the evidence-base so interventions conducted in rural areas have the maximum possible impact

November 2014 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Composite illustration of a couple dancing, a woman swimming, a scale, diary, and vegetables.Check out the November issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: Steps Toward a Healthier Life
    People with diabetes have a problem with blood sugar. Their blood sugar, or blood glucose, can climb too high. Having high levels of sugar in your blood can cause a lot of trouble. Diabetes raises your risk for heart disease, blindness, amputations, and other serious issues. But the most common type of diabetes, called type 2 diabetes, can be prevented or delayed if you know what steps to take.
  • Parkinson’s Disease: Understanding a Complicated Condition
    We rely on our brains for every movement we make, whether writing, walking, talking, or even sleeping. But a serious brain disorder like Parkinson’s disease can rob a person of the ability to do everyday tasks that many of us take for granted. There’s no cure, but treatment can help. And researchers continue to seek new understanding to improve medical care.
  • Progress Toward a Bird Flu Vaccine
    An experimental bird flu vaccine triggered a powerful immune response in more than half of the volunteers who received it. The approach might lead to better vaccines against a variety of flu viruses.
  • Participating in Alzheimer’s Research
    Alzheimer’s disease is a brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills. Eventually, affected people can’t perform even simple tasks. There’s no cure, but researchers are now testing new ways to diagnose, treat, or even prevent Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Featured Website: Safe to Sleep
    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death among infants between 1 month and 1 year of age. Find out how you can reduce your baby’s risk of SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Padlet: A Free Virtual Bulletin Board and Brainstorming Tool

A recent AEA365 Evaluation Tip-a-Day featured a review and several hot tips for Padlet, a freely available web-based bulletin board system. The hot tips include the use of Padlet as an anonymous brainstorming activity in response to a question or idea, and as a backchannel for students or conference attendees to share resources and raise questions for future discussion. Padlet’s bulletin board configuration settings are intuitive and easy to use with various backgrounds and freeform, tabular, or grid note arrangement display on the bulletin board. Free Padlet accounts can be created by either signing up directly or by linking to an existing Google or Facebook account. Padlet includes many privacy options that are clearly explained, including “Private” mode, requiring the use of a password for you and those you invite to participate to access the Padlet, and “Public” mode to view, write or moderate. A new update feature includes a variety of ways to share Padlet data, ranging from choosing the icon for six different social media channels to downloading data as a PDF or Excel/CSV file for analysis. For a trial run of this resource, visit the NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center’s Padlet about the OERC Evaluation Series booklets and leave your input! Posts will be moderated on the Padlet before they display publicly.

CDC Program Evaluation Resources

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a freely available ‘how to’ resource Introduction to Program Evaluation for Public Health Programs: A Self Study Guide. Examples of public and community health programs that can be considered for program evaluation include direct service interventions, community-based mobilization efforts, research initiatives into issues such as health disparities, advocacy work, and training programs. The guide is available online or as a PDF document that consists of a six-step process (from Engaging Stakeholders to Ensure Use of Evaluation Findings), a helpful Glossary of program evaluation terminology, and Resources for additional publications, toolkits, and more to support public and community health program evaluation work. A related CDC guide A Framework for Program Evaluation is one of several resources featured in the Evaluation Planning section of the NN/LM OERC Tools and Resources for Evaluation web page.

New ACA Materials Available in Spanish!

From Coverage to Care (C2C) is an initiative from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) designed to help people with new health coverage understand their benefits and connect to primary care and the preventive services that are right for them. C2C resources, available in both English and Spanish, are now available to download and print.

Available resources include:

  • A Roadmap to Better Care and a Healthier You (Una Guía para Un Mejor Cuidado y Una Vida Más Saludable) that includes 8 steps to explain what health coverage is, and how to use it to get needed care.
  • Consumer tools including a sample insurance card and a sample explanation of benefits.
  • An 11-part video series that helps explain the information covered in the Roadmap.

To learn when new resources become available, sign up for notifications through the Minority Health listserv. From Coverage to Care materials are also available through the order page.

HSICT Library Value Toolkit

October is both Canadian Library Month and National Medical Librarians Month, making it an ideal time to celebrate and promote the value of our work! It is an excellent time to launch the HSICT’s (Health Science Information Consortium of Toronto) Library Value Toolkit. This resource is the creation of the HSICT Task Force on Evaluating Library Services. Task Force members, from a cross section of HSICT member libraries, distilled and organized the information in the toolkit which includes tools, examples, recommendations, as well as samples and strategies from various work settings.

Qualitative Data Visualization

An innovative and compelling approach to creating qualitative data visualizations with illustrations is provided by Fresh Spectrum. The process begins by taking a long narrative such as a focus group transcription, and chunking it into a few paragraphs per concept with a unique illustration for each one. One option is to use your organization’s existing images or Creative Commons-licensed images for illustrating concepts. The next step for the visualization uses the images with brief captions as an online data dashboard, where visitors can click on the captioned image of interest to them to access the more detailed narrative. One example describes how to do this within a WordPress portfolio blog template, or a simpler strategy of creating HTML anchor links to each individual section within a longer text, which then leads to the longer narrative.

The NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) has more resources available from the Reporting and Visualizing tab of the OERC Tools and Resources for Evaluation Guide.

American Evaluation Association’s Potent Presentation Information

The American Evaluation Association (AEA) sponsors a Potent Presentations Initiative (p2i) that has a stated purpose of helping evaluators improve their presentation skills, both within a conference setting and as part of individual practice. P2i challenges evaluators to hone in on three concepts: Their message, their design, and their delivery.

There are a wealth of handouts available as PDF files, Word documents, and Powerpoint presentations available from the p2i tools website that sometimes include AEA conference specifications in addition to many great messaging, designing and delivery principles. For an example of each principle be sure to check out the Presentation Preparation Checklist, How to Design a Research Poster, and the Delivery Glue Handout.