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Archive for the ‘NLM Resources’ Category

Librarian’s Guide to NCBI Five-Day Course in April 2014

The NCBI, in partnership with the National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC), will offer the Librarian’s Guide to NCBI course on the NIH campus in April 2014. This will be the second presentation of the course; it was previously offered in the spring of 2013. After the course, lecture slides and hands-on practical exercises will be posted on the education area of the NCBI FTP site and video tutorials of the course lectures will be available on the NCBI YouTube channel. Materials from the 2013 course are currently available.

A Librarian’s Guide is an intense five-day exploration of modern molecular biology, genetic, and other biomedical data as represented at the NCBI. The course explains how and why these data are generated, their importance in modern biomedical research, and how to access them through the NCBI Web site. It is intended for medical librarians in the United States who currently are offering bioinformatics education and support services to their patrons or are planning to offer such services in the future. More information is available in the newest NCBI Insights blog post.

All applicants for A Librarian’s Guide must have successfully completed the asynchronous online Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching class, which is a six-week introduction to molecular biology and bioinformatics taught by Diane Rein, Ph.D., MLS, and offered through the NTC. The Fundamentals course is open to any medical librarian in the United States interested in an introduction to bioinformatics and NCBI resources.  A winter 2014 Fundamentals class, which runs from February 10 – March 21, 2014, is open for applications. Only people who have successfully completed the Fundamentals class may apply to A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI. The application process for eligible Fundamentals candidates will be announced in February 2014.

WebWISER 4.5 Now Available!

WISER logoWebWISER 4.5 is now available. WISER is a system designed to assist emergency responders in hazardous material incidents. WISER provides a wide range of information on hazardous substances, including substance identification support, physical characteristics, human health information, and containment and suppression advice.

This new release integrates Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management (CHEMM) content and updates the Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG) content to 2012. CHEMM integration brings the following new features to WISER:

  • New hospital provider and preparedness planner profiles, along with a customized home screen for all WISER profiles
  • Acute care guidelines for six known mass casualty agents/agent classes
  • The addition of a wealth of CHEMM reference material
  • CHEMM Intelligent Syndrome Tool (CHEMM-IST), a new help identify tool designed to diagnose the type of chemical exposure after a mass casualty incident

Continuing Education Course Materials for MLA Disaster Information Specialization Available from NLM!

MLA Disaster Information Specialization Program logoDisaster health information courses and supporting materials are now available from the Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) at the National Library of Medicine. The courses are open to anyone at no cost and are approved for Medical Library Association (MLA) continuing education credit. Completion of a series of courses may be used toward the MLA Disaster Information Specialization certificate. The application fee is $55 for MLA members and $75 for non-members. To earn the Basic certificate, students complete the following required 15 hours of courses:

An additional 12 hours of courses can be used toward the Advanced level certificate:

Course materials may be used and adapted by anyone giving presentations or classes on this content. When using or adapting materials, please give credit to the original course authors and NLM. DIMRC would like to hear about the use of these course materials and what they can offer (improve) that would make it easier to teach this material. If you are interested in being an online or classroom instructor for one or more of these courses, please send your name, title, organization, city, and state/country to Katie Chan.

Many thanks to MLA for coordinating the initial development of courses and for hosting the course materials and registration on their web site (with funding from NLM)!

What’s New for 2014 MeSH

Three hundred four (304) new MeSH Headings were added in 2014. Forty-eight (48) MeSH Headings were either changed or deleted and replaced with more up-to-date terminology. Three new publication types have been introduced for 2014 MeSH:

  • Dataset: This publication type is defined as “An organized collection of values stored permanently in a formalized manner suitable for communication, interpretation, or processing.” This publication type will not be used in combination with any other publication type as it is not to be used for journal articles that contain or produce datasets as part of the publication (including Supplemental Materials). Rather, it will be used on citations to items that are stand-alone descriptions of the metadata of a particular dataset.
  • Observational Study: The scope note defines this publication type as “A clinical study in which participants may receive diagnostic, therapeutic, or other types of interventions, but the investigator does not assign participants to specific interventions (as in an interventional study).” This publication type should not be confused with the MeSH Heading “Observation” which is used for a scientific method. There is a related new MeSH Heading “Observational Studies as Topic,” which is used for general design, methodology, economies, etc. of observational studies.
  • Pragmatic Clinical Trial: This publication type refers to “Randomized clinical trials that compare interventions in clinical settings and which look at a range of effectiveness outcomes and impacts.” There is a related new MeSH Heading, “Pragmatic Clinical Trial as Topic,” which is used for general design, methodology, economics, etc. of pragmatic clinical trials.

Additional details are available by consulting the 2014 online Introduction to MeSH and the NLM Technical Bulletin.

NLM Releases Digitized Collection of Its Publications and Productions

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has announced a new addition to its Digital Collections: over 400 NLM publications and productions dating from the 1860s to the 1990s. This new digital collection encompasses all printed monographic publications produced by NLM and its earlier incarnation as the Library of the Surgeon General’s Office. The collection also includes nearly three dozen audiovisual productions produced by the NLM during the past six decades, as well as publications of the NLM’s institutional and historical “sister,” the Army Medical Museum, which is today the National Museum of Health and Medicine. In the early 1920s, the Library of the Surgeon General’s Office was renamed the Army Medical Library, and it was housed with the Army Medical Museum until the 1950s when the institutions were physically separated as they are today.  They continue to share a common goal of collecting, preserving, and providing knowledge about the past, present, and future of biomedicine and health care.

Among the variety of materials in this collection; including books, catalogs, indexes, prospectuses, policy statements, planning documents, ephemera, and technical reports; are dozens of historical gems, including:

  • the first printed catalogs of the Army Medical Museum and the Library of the Surgeon General’s Office in 1863 and 1864, both published during the Civil War;
  • a 1963 pamphlet introducing MEDLARS, the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, which represented the birth of electronic storage and retrieval of indexed medical literature;
  • all 61 volumes of the Index-Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon-General’s Office, originally published from 1880 to 1961, representing one of the monuments of the Library’s longstanding, systematic indexing of the medical literature. The release of these digitized volumes follows on the NLM earlier this year releasing the Extensible Markup Language (XML) data from the IndexCat database, to help open this key resource in the history of medicine and science to new uses and users;
  • Dream Anatomy, the illustrated 2006 catalogue based on the National Library of Medicine’s milestone Dream Anatomy exhibition;
  • a 1994 video entitled, “NLM and the Internet,” which gives a very early look at the Internet promoting the use of Gopher files servers and Mosaic, one of the earliest web browsers first created in 1992.

Apply to Attend the Winter 2014 Online Class “Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching”

Health science librarians in the United States are invited to participate in the next offering of the online bioinformatics training course, Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching, sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, NLM Training Center (NTC). This rigorous course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI. Attending this course will improve your ability to initiate or extend bioinformatics services at your institution. Prior knowledge of molecular biology and genetics is not required. This course is a prerequisite for the face-to-face workshop, Librarian’s Guide to NCBI.

The major goal of this course is to provide an introduction to bioinformatics theory and practice in support of developing and implementing library-based bioinformatics products and services. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course encompasses visualizing bioinformatics end-user practice, places a strong emphasis on hands-on acquisition of NCBI search competencies, and a working molecular biology vocabulary, through self-paced hands-on exercises. This course is offered online (asynchronous) from February 10 – March 21, 2014. The course format includes video lectures, readings, a molecular vocabulary exercise, an NCBI discovery exercise, and other hands-on exercises. The instructor is Diane Rein, Ph.D., MLS, Bioinformatics and Molecular Biology Liaison from the Health Science Library, University at Buffalo.

Due to limited enrollment, interested participants are required to complete an application form. The deadline for completing the application is January 10, 2014; participants will be notified of acceptance on January 22, 2014. The course is offered at no cost to participants. Participants who complete all assignments and the course evaluation by the due dates within the course will receive fifteen hours of MLA CE credit. No partial CE credit is granted. Participants who complete the required coursework and earn full continuing education credit will be eligible to apply to attend the five-day Librarian’s Guide that will be offered in April 2014 if they so choose.

Visit the Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching webpage for more information and to apply. If you have any questions, e-mail the course organizers.

Directory of Health Organizations Online (DIRLINE) Retires!

Due to a changing technical and budgetary environment, the NLM Division of Specialized Information Services (SIS) is longer adding, updating or maintaining records in Directory of Health Organizations Online (DIRLINE). DIRLINE was the National Library of Medicine’s online database containing location and descriptive information about a wide variety of information resources including organizations, research resources, projects, and databases concerned with health and biomedicine.

As of October 1st, 2013, and for the following fiscal year, DIRLINE is searchable but the records are marked as “archived.” SIS expects to retire DIRLINE at the end of 2014. These changes do not affect Health Hotlines.

WISER for Windows 4.5 Now Available!

The National Library of Medicine’s WISER for Windows 4.5 is now available. This new version of WISER fully integrates Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management (CHEMM) content and updates the Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG) content to 2012.

Here’s a closer look at what’s new in this release:

  • Full integration of CHEMM content, which includes:
    • New hospital provider and preparedness planner profiles, along with a customized home screen for all WISER profiles
    • Acute care guidelines for six known mass casualty agents/agent classes
    • The addition of a wealth of CHEMM reference material
    • CHEMM Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST), a new Help Identify tool designed to diagnose the type of chemical exposure after a mass casualty incident
  • ERG content is now updated to the 2012 release. This includes the full ERG 2012 tool.

WISER for Windows 4.5 can be downloaded directly from the WISER website.

Coming Soon

Look for these exciting additions in the coming months:

  • WebWISER 4.5, which includes CHEMM integration, ERG 2012 updates, and more
  • WISER for Android 3.1, which adds Help Identify Chemical and protective distance mapping to this popular platform

NLM Releases Enhancements to Its “Digital Collections” Repository

Redesigned homepage with informative images highlighting repository contentThe National Library of Medicine released several enhancements to Digital Collections, the free online archive of biomedical resources, at the end of September.

New features include:

  • Redesigned homepage with informative images highlighting repository content
  • Responsive sizing of homepage and search results to better accommodate the wide range of displays
  • More consistent, cleaner look and feel across the Web site, including the latest NIH & NLM branding
  • New “Refine by” feature on the left which allows users to limit searches to specific facets

In addition to these enhancements, technically inclined readers may be interested to know about these significant changes that improve system performance and flexibility:

  • Fresh indexing of metadata and full text for more efficient search & retrieval
  • Replacement of the Muradora front-end application with Blacklight, an open-source discovery interface which sits on top of the repository’s Solr index
  • Upgrades to all major software components supporting the repository, including the underlying Fedora Commons framework
  • New server architecture that better isolates components for improved security
  • More powerful hardware providing faster search and presentation responsiveness

In November, Digital Collections reached the milestone of providing access to 10,000 digitized resources. The repository contains over 12 million discrete files. NLM regularly deposits content from its digitization activities, including current projects focused on WWII-era materials and NLM-authored publications. For more information about Digital Collections, see the About Digital Collections page and Help Documentation.

New NLM Traveling Exhibition “From DNA to Beer: Harnessing Nature in Medicine and Industry”

The Era of Antibiotics, painted by Robert A. Thom for Parke, Davis & Company, 1950s. Printed with Permission of American Pharmacists Association Foundation. Copyright 2009 APhA Foundation.NLM’s Exhibition Program has announced a new traveling banner exhibit, From DNA to Beer: Harnessing Nature in Medicine and Industry, now available for booking! A link to the online exhibition is also available. From DNA to Beer: Harnessing Nature in Medicine and Industry explores some of the processes, problems, and potential inherent in technologies that use microorganisms for health and commercial purposes. Over the past two centuries, scientists, in partnership with industry, have developed techniques using and modifying life forms like yeast, molds, and bacteria, to create a host of new therapies and produce better foods and beverages. The exhibition illustrates the history of this dynamic relationship among microbes, medicine, technology, and industry, which has spanned centuries.

For questions about the traveling exhibit, contact nlmtravelingexhibits@mail.nlm.nih.gov. For information on currently available and future NLM traveling exhibits, please visit the Exhibition Program website.