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Archive for the ‘NLM Resources’ Category

PHPartners.org Website Redesign: Volunteers Needed for Usability Testing!

The National Library of Medicine is currently assessing and redesigning the Partners in Information Access for the Public Health Workforce website. PHPartners is a collaboration of U.S. government agencies, public health organizations, and health sciences libraries which provides timely, convenient access to selected public health resources on the Internet. To better serve and understand the needs of audiences, volunteers are being recruited for surveys and usability testing, involving participation in seven 15-30 minute sessions spread over a 12-16 month period. You are not required to participate in all seven sessions. Anyone interested in participating in the testing should complete an online form by March 5. Your feedback is invaluable to the improvement of the PHPartners.org website!

NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine Winter 2015 Issue Available Online!

Cover of Winter 2015 NIH MedlinePlus issueThe Winter 2015 issue of NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine features information on healthy aging with Go4Life, living with Alzheimer’s disease, finding good health information on the Internet, atrial fibrillation, and treating alcohol problems. The cover features Howie Mandel, a host, performer, and producer, who was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AFib). He discusses his involvement with the National Stroke Association’s Fibs or Facts campaign that raises awareness about AFib and its increased risk for stroke.

The magazine also recaps the Science Pathfinders at NLM/NIH event on September 26, 2014, where more than 500 middle and high school students at public and private schools in Maryland and the District of Columbia visited the NIH campus in Bethesda to hear presentations from top scientists and medical doctors on the latest advances in medical research. This issue’s HealthLine describes the NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and and the Pharmaceuticals division of GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) small phase 1 clinical trial of the experimental vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease.

NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine is the free, trusted consumer guide to the vast array of authoritative online health and medical information at MedlinePlus. Published four times a year, the magazine showcases the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) latest medical research and healthcare information. NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine is freely available as a print subscription, e-mail alerts, and online.

Deadline Extended for Public Comments on Proposals to Enhance Transparency of Clinical Trial Results

In November, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) released for public comment two proposals to increase the transparency of clinical trials via information submitted to ClinicalTrials.gov, a publicly accessible database operated by the National Library of Medicine. One is a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that describes proposed regulations for registering and submitting summary results of certain clinical trials to ClinicalTrials.gov in compliance with Title VIII of the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA). A major proposed change from current requirements is the expansion of the scope of clinical trials required to submit summary results to include trials of unapproved, unlicensed, and uncleared products. The second proposal is a draft NIH policy that would extend the similar registration and reporting requirements to all clinical trials funded by NIH, regardless of whether they are subject to FDAAA. Both proposals aim to improve public access to information about specified clinical trials, information that is not necessarily available from other public sources.

The public may comment on any aspect of the NPRM or proposed NIH Policy. Written comments on the NPRM should be submitted to docket number NIH-2011-0003. Commenters are asked to indicate the specific section of the NPRM to which each comment refers. Written comments on the proposed NIH Policy should be submitted electronically to the Office of Clinical Research and Bioethics Policy, Office of Science Policy, NIH, via email; mail at 6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 750, Bethesda, MD 20892; or by fax at 301-496-9839, by March 23, 2015.

List of Serials Indexed for Online Users, 2015 Edition, Now Available in XML

The List of Serials Indexed for Online Users (LSIOU), 2015 edition, is now available in XML format. The 2015 edition contains 14,856 serial titles, including titles currently indexed for MEDLINE as well as titles indexed over time which have ceased or changed titles. The titles are listed alphabetically by the journal title abbreviation. Tailored lists of indexed journals may be generated from the NLM Catalog. While the XML version of the LSIOU is a snapshot in time, the results of a search in the NLM Catalog will provide a “real time” list for the LSIOU.

For a “real time” list for the LSIOU, enter reportedmedline in the search box and click “Search.” For a list of only the currently indexed MEDLINE journals, enter currentlyindexed in the search box and click “Search.” Display and sort formats are selected from the results page; click on the Display Settings pull-down menu to choose a display format (for example, the Journal display) and an appropriate sort (for example, Title or Title Abbreviation). To save the entire list as one document, click on the “Send to” pull-down menu, with “File” as the destination, choose a format and sort order, and then click “Create File.” Click “Save” in the File Download pop-up box. Provide your directory location and desired file name.

Additional information about journals indexed for MEDLINE can be found via the links from the MEDLINE/PubMed Resources web page. This page includes Journals Recently Accepted by NLM for Inclusion in MEDLINE, a list of titles selected by the Literature Selection Technical Review Committee (LSTRC) that meets three times per year in February, June, and October. Results from those meetings appear online about six weeks after each meeting, both on the web page and in the NLM Catalog. For additional details about searching the NLM Catalog, visit NLM Catalog Quick Tours and Searching for Journals in the NLM Catalog.

National Library of Medicine Announces Pill Image Recognition Request for Information

NLM Pill Image Recognition Pilot logoThe National Library of Medicine (NLM) has issued a call for participation in a Pill Image Recognition (PIR) Request for Information (RFI). Unidentified and misidentified prescription pills present challenges for individuals and professionals. Unidentified pills can be found by family members, health professionals, educators, and law enforcement. The nine out of 10 US citizens over age 65 who take more than one prescription pill can be prone to misidentifying those pills.

This PIR RFI is a pilot for a forthcoming PIR Challenge whose goal is to develop smart phone apps that individuals can use to take pictures of prescription pills and then search for and retrieve pill images and associated data of likely matches in an NLM database. NLM anticipates that respondents will include professionals and students, individually or in teams, in computer vision and computer graphics working on content-based image retrieval. Instructions for responding to the RFI are available on the PIR website.

The deadline for submissions to this RFI is Monday, April 27, 2015.

NLM to host “A Tribute to Marshall Nirenberg” on March 17, 2015

Marshall Nirenberg in the lab, ca. 1962Fifty years ago, as a scientist at the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Marshall W. Nirenberg (1927–2010) completed his first summary of the genetic code—one of the most significant documents in the history of twentieth-century science. This summary, now in the collections of the National Library of Medicine, is a painstakingly handwritten chart of the discovery of how sequences of DNA, known as “triplets,” direct the assembly of amino acids into the structural and functional proteins essential to life. Dr. Nirenberg would go on to win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1968 for this work, sharing the award with Robert W. Holley of Cornell University and Har Gobind Khorana of the University of Wisconsin at Madison “for their interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis.”

This spring, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) will host a public program—A Tribute to Marshall Nirenberg—to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of this scientific accomplishment. The event will be webcast on Tuesday, March 17, from 10:00am to 12:30pm (Pacific). The event will also be free and open to the public, in the NLM’s Lister Hill Auditorium, Building 38a, on the Bethesda campus of the National Institutes of Health. More information about the event and a list of speakers are available on the NLM website.

Learn more about Dr. Nirenberg, his work, and his accomplishments at NLM’s Profiles in Science website and in a recent post on the NLM History of Medicine Division’s blog, Circulating Now. Throughout 2015 NLM will continue to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of Nirenberg’s discovery through additional posts on Circulating Now.

Nucleic Acids Research Database 2015 Issue Features NCBI Databases

The 22nd annual edition of the Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue features nine free full-text papers from NCBI staff that present recent updates to the databases, including GenBank, Gene, and RefSeq. These papers describe the state of NCBI databases as well as future plans to improve their use, from new reference resources created to improve the usability of viral sequence data to in-house curation efforts in the Conserved Domain Database, and much more. The articles are all available from PubMed.

New Secondary Source ID (Databank) Search Value

A new PubMed search option “hasdatabanklist” has been created to retrieve citations that carry a value in the Secondary Source ID [SI] field regardless of what the specific value(s) may be. Typically, the SI field contains information about where additional data related to an article are deposited. Please see MEDLINE Databank Sources to view the list of repository values.

To limit a search to citations that may have deposited data in a repository and acknowledged that deposit in the full text of the article, search using AND hasdatabanklist; for example: randomized controlled trial [pt] AND hasdatabanklist.

National Library of Medicine Resource Update: LiverTox

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) LiverTox resource is a free website providing up-to-date, comprehensive and unbiased information about drug-induced liver injury caused by prescription and nonprescription drugs, herbals, and dietary supplements. LiverTox represents a collaborative effort by medical and scientific specialists to provide a central repository of clinical information in support of clinical and basic research on the prevention and control of drug-induced liver injury. The site also provides guidance to clinicians and healthcare providers on the diagnosis and management of this important cause of liver disease. LiverTox contains approximately 850 drug and herbal records. It is a joint effort of the Liver Disease Research Branch of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and the Division of Specialized Information Services (SIS) of NLM.

Look for these LiverTox updates in the coming months:

  • Addition of about 100 new records.
  • New histopathologic imaging (microscopic structure of diseased tissue) from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) included in drug records.
  • Section  providing public access to reference cases, initially populated with clinical cases from the Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network, a consortium of eight academic medical centers throughout the United States. This repository will allow for statistical analyses of trends in drug-induced liver disease, as well as better characterization of clinical patterns of injury.

National Library of Medicine Resource Update: Alternatives to Animal Testing Portal

The National Library of Medicine’s (NLM) Alternatives to Animal Testing (ALTBIB) portal provides access to PubMed/MEDLINE citations relevant to alternatives to the use of live vertebrates in biomedical research and testing. The ALTBIB topics and subtopics are aligned with current U.S. and international approaches. For example, information is provided on in silico, in vitro, and refined or improved animal testing methods. Strategies that incorporate validated methods and other approaches are also covered. In addition to the topic areas for PubMed searches, the ALTBIB portal includes a searchable bibliographic collection of alternatives to animal testing, including citations from published articles, books, book chapters, and technical reports published from 1980 to 2000.

The Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), part of NLM’s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET), now includes subheadings (“/alternative/ and /in vitro tests/”) in the Human and Non-Human Toxicity Excerpts fields. These subheadings allow users to locate data from in vitro and other alternative methods. For example, users can search “ALTERNATIVE IN VITRO TESTS” to locate records with this data. Coverage includes results from methods validated by the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) and the European Union Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL-ECVAM).