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Archive for the ‘NLM Resources’ Category

The National Library of Medicine Announces 2014 Association of Health Care Journalists-NLM Fellows

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ) are pleased to announce the 2014 AHCJ-NLM Fellows. This year’s class features eight reporters and editors representing diverse media backgrounds and interests. The program, now in its sixth year, brings journalists selected by AHCJ to NLM for four days of training in use of NLM’s health information resources, such as PubMed, PubMed Health, Genetics Home Reference, TOXMAP, ClinicalTrials.gov, and MedlinePlus. The Fellows also receive briefings about health care issues, such as the adoption of electronic health records by patients and health care providers, as well as consumer health resources provided by the National Cancer Institute. New in 2014, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) will update the AHCJ-NLM Fellows about innovative health care issues, such as comparative effectiveness research.

The 2014 AHCJ-NLM Fellows are:

  • Karen Bouffard, health care writer, The Detroit News. Bouffard was a 2013 National Health Journalism Fellow with the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School of Journalism.
  • Matthew Glasser, health and medical producer, NBC Southern California. Glasser is an Emmy Award-winning journalist and was the co-creator and executive producer of NurseTV and Healthcare Heroes.
  • Sarah Karlin, senior writer, The Pink Sheet and The Pink Sheet DAILY. Karlin formerly was the FDANews’ congressional and generic drugs editor.
  • Kimberly Leonard, health reporter and producer, U.S. News & World Report. Leonard was a health reporter with the Center for Public Integrity prior to joining U.S. News & World Report.
  • Cheryl Platzman Weinstock, freelance health/science writer, who specializes in women’s health issues. Weinstock’s work frequently appears in the New York Times, Women’s Day, and the Oprah Magazine. She contributed to the New York Times’ Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of 9/11.
  • Marie Powers, staff writer, BioWorld Today. Powers was part of the BioWorld Today team, which received the Best Daily Publication award in 2013 and 2014 from the Specialized Information Publishers Association.
  • Cindy Sharp, health and medical reporter, Associated Press Television and Online Video. Sharp previously worked for MSNBC and Tribune Broadcasting.
  • J.K. Wall, health care reporter, Indianapolis Business Journal, and The Dose, a blog on health care finance. Wall worked as a business reporter at The Indianapolis Star before joining the Indianapolis Business Journal.

NN/LM Ending Support for Internet Explorer 8

Due to recent software updates on nnlm.gov, Internet Explorer 8 is no longer supported. Some read-only sections of nnlm.gov will continue to be available via IE8. However, anyone using IE8 will probably not be able to submit assignments in online courses utilizing the NN/LM Moodle framework, and may not even be able to access and log into Moodle courses. Other nnlm.gov services that require data to be posted to the server are also likely to fail. In addition, DOCLINE will not support IE8 after the end of 2014. Please visit the NN/LM System Requirements page to see a complete list of supported browsers. For best usability, NLM recommends that libraries should begin talking to their local IT departments about upgrading their browsers to at least Internet Explorer 10.

Starting January 12, 2016, Microsoft will drop support, including security updates, for older Internet Explorer browser versions. Only the most recent version of IE for a supported operating system will receive technical support and security updates. Microsoft’s Stay up-to-date with Internet Explorer blog page provides a good explanation of why IE users should upgrade to the most current version.

New Resource for Pediatric-Related Disaster and Emergency Health Information

The National Library of Medicine Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) has announced a new resource directed at the needs of children in disasters and emergencies, which present unique planning challenges for health officials, responders, and providers. Multiple U.S. Department of Health and Human Services agencies and funded organizations collaborated to develop this comprehensive online guide to serve as a central source for pediatric-related disaster and emergency health information, which brings into one place professional-level materials, documents, Web sites, and articles distinctly about children from authoritative sources; including government, private, non-profit and international organizations and agencies.

To learn about this robust new resource, the collaboration behind it, and how it can make information searching more efficient, attend the next Disaster Information Specialist Webinar on Thursday, September 11, at 1:00 – 2:00 PM PDT. Four featured presenters will address the topic Not Just Small Adults: Health Resources on Children in Disasters and Emergencies.

Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources from NLM

A new web page, Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources, is now available from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC). The resources on this page may be of value to international and local organizations and individuals providing Ebola outbreak-related services in West Africa, as well as friends and family of people in the affected region.

This resource complements NLM’s activation of the the Emergency Access Initiative in support of medical efforts in West Africa. The Emergency Access Initiative is a collaborative partnership between the National Library of Medicine and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text articles from over 650 biomedical serial titles and over 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. The free access period is August 12, 2014 – September 11, 2014. The news story, NLM Launches Emergency Access Initiative, Granting Free Access to Books and Journals for Healthcare Professionals Fighting Ebola Outbreak, provides more detail on the NLM response to the Ebola outbreak.

NLM Launches “Pictures of Nursing: The Zwerdling Postcard Collection”

Nurses from the George A. Brewster Nurse Training School pose for a group portrait, Jacksonville, FL, 1908The National Library of Medicine has launched a special display in the History of Medicine Division Reading Room and an online adaptation of Pictures of Nursing: The Zwerdling Postcard Collection. The NLM History of Medicine Division acquired an archive of 2,588 postcards from American nurse and collector Michael Zwerdling, RN. This unique archive consists of postcards with images of nurses and the nursing profession from around the world, produced between 1893 and 2011 with many examples coming from the “Golden Age” of postcards—roughly 1907 to 1920. Pictures of Nursing provides a way to understand the types of images that are represented in the full collection. The exhibit presents a selection of these historic postcards, spanning a century of nursing imagery. Nurses and nursing have been the frequent subjects of postcards. These images are informed by cultural values; ideas about women, men, and work; and by attitudes toward class, race, and national differences. By documenting the relationship of nursing to significant forces in 20th-century life, such as war and disease, these postcards reveal how nursing was seen during those times.

This unique exhibition will be open to the public in the History of Medicine Division Reading Room from September 2, 2014 to August 21, 2015, and will be available online. The exhibit curator is Julia Hallam, PhD, professor of communication and media at the University of Liverpool. The online exhibition incorporates a “Digital Gallery,” which includes a selection of 585 postcards from the Zwerdling collection not shown in the special display. The Digital Gallery also includes online activities, providing viewers new avenues to explore beyond the exhibition. Education resources are also featured in the online exhibition, including a lesson plan for grades 9-10 that investigates the exhibition content; a higher education module; an online activity, and a robust selection of resources including K-12 suggested readings. In addition, the Web feature, “Related Resources at NLM,” includes a selection of published articles on contemporary nursing issues available through PubMed Central, which provides free access to over 3.1 million full-text biomedical and life science journal articles.

MeSH on Demand Update: How to Find Citations Related to Your Text

Screenshot of the MeSH on Demand results pageIn May 2014, NLM introduced MeSH on Demand, a Web-based tool that suggests MeSH terms from your text such as an abstract or grant summary up to 10,000 characters using the MTI (Medical Text Indexer) software. For more background information, see the NLM Technical Bulletin, MeSH on Demand Tool: An Easy Way to Identify Relevant MeSH Terms.

The MeSH on Demand results page is now organized into three sections:

  • Section 1: Original input text (with the length of the input text)
  • Section 2: MeSH terms with links to the MeSH Browser
  • Section 3: Top ten PubMed/MEDLINE citations related to your text

The new MeSH on Demand feature displays the PubMed ID (PMID) for the top ten related citations in PubMed that were also used in computing the MeSH term recommendations. To access this new feature, start from the MeSH on Demand homepage, add your text, such as a project summary, into the box labeled “Text to be Processed.” Then, click the “Find MeSH Terms” button. MeSH on Demand lists the top ten related citation PMIDs from PubMed/MEDLINE. Each PMID is hyperlinked to that citation in PubMed. This new feature in MeSH on Demand is a result of user feedback received from our initial MeSH on Demand release. Users are encouraged to continue to send questions, suggestions, and comments to: NLMMESH-MOD@mail.nih.gov.

SPL/DailyMed Jamboree 2014 Workshop – Practical use of DailyMed and RxNorm Drug Data

The National Library of Medicine is sponsoring a free public meeting, SPL/DailyMed Jamboree 2014 Workshop – Practical use of DailyMed and RxNorm Drug Data. Speakers from the Federal government (NLM and IHS), industry (Bayer, Wolters-Kluwer), academia, and non-profit sectors will speak on their experience with Structured Product Label (SPL) drug data as well as RxNorm. The emphasis is on practical and novel ways to use this free data, which is produced cooperatively by NLM and FDA. Topics include SPLs and clinical decision support, extracting indication and drug interaction data from SPLs using natural language processing, e-prescribing experience within the Indian Health Service, Linked Data and SPLs, the use of RxNorm by the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), and more. The proceedings will be webcast and archived.

When: September 18, 9:30 AM to 4:15 PM (ET)
Where: Lister Hill Auditorium, National Library of Medicine, 8600 Rockville Pike, NIH Building 38A, 1st Floor, Bethesda, Maryland 20894

Visit the SPL/DailyMed Jamboree 2014 Workshop webpage to register for the in-person meeting and to view the agenda and speakers. The link to the webcast will be added when available.

NLM Launches Emergency Access Initiative for Healthcare Professionals Fighting Ebola Outbreak

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) has been activated to support healthcare professionals working on the Ebola public health emergency in West Africa. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from over 650 biomedical journals and over 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or supplement for libraries affected by disasters that need to continue to serve medical staff and affiliated users. It is also intended for medical personnel responding to the specified disaster. EAI is not an open access collection. It is only intended for those affected by the disaster or assisting the affected population. If you know of a library or organization involved in healthcare efforts in response to the Ebola outbreak, please let them know of this service. EAI was activated four times in the past, including following the earthquake and subsequent cholera epidemic in Haiti, flooding in Pakistan and the earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

NLM thanks the numerous participating publishers for their generous support of this initiative: American Academy of Pediatrics, American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Chemical Society, American College of Physicians, American Medical Association, American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists, ASM Press, B.C. Decker, BMJ, EBSCOHost, Elsevier, FA Davis, Mary Ann Liebert, Massachusetts Medical Society, McGraw-Hill, Merck Publishing, Oxford University Press, People’s Medical Publishing House, Springer, University of Chicago Press, Wiley and Wolters Kluwer.

Resources on Ebola

NLM has several other resources that will be helpful for people working on Ebola:

HHS agencies, including CDC and ASPR, also provide the latest Ebola information available through social media, including Twitter@phegov, @CDCgov, @CDCEmergency and Facebook Public Health Emergency, CDC, CDC Emergency Preparedness and Response. The CDC also has a comprehensive set of resources on its Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever web page.

PubMed Commons Update

@PubMedCommonsPubMed Commons set the stage for commenting on any publication in PubMed, the world’s largest searchable database of biomedical literature. New infrastructure and design enhancements have been implemented to improve the user experience and support the PubMed Commons community, and they are now live on PubMed and PubMed Commons. At center stage is new artwork that has been adopted for the PubMed Commons blog, Twitter account, and homepage, to present a clear, unified identity across platforms. The homepage has also been streamlined to consolidate information about joining and using PubMed Commons in a single page to help users get started. A synopsis of the most recent blog post is now available at the top of the homepage to help users stay up-to-date on PubMed Commons.

For several months, comment rating has given members the chance to weigh in on what comments they find useful. Visitors to PubMed can see these ratings alongside comments. Ratings are a key element in calculating the comment and commenter scores that determine the appearance of comments in the “Selected comments” stream on the homepage. Some new site modifications will highlight contributions to PubMed Commons. On the homepage, “Top comments now” will feature the top three recent comments. On PubMed records, “Selected comments” (from the homepage stream) prompt the appearance of an icon above abstracts, directing readers to comments below. And now the most recent tweet about a PubMed Commons comment appears on the homepage for PubMed searches. Check it out!

Exciting New Features Added to ChemIDplus!

3D model of DigoxinChemIDplus is a dictionary of over 400,000 chemicals (names, synonyms, and structures). It includes links to NLM and other databases and resources, including ones to over 100 federal, state and international agencies. ChemIDplus Lite is designed for simple searching on name or registry number. ChemIDplus Advanced helps users draw their own structures and perform similarity and substructure searches. ChemIDplus records are updated daily. The following new features are now available:

  • A new “3D” button on search results pages provides calculated three dimensional structure models for over 300,000 chemicals and 645,000 variations. Users can adjust the rotation speed, the image type (ball and stick, space fill, wireframe), and 3D angle of viewing; dragging the image changes its orientation. Right clicking on the structure box provides other control options such as color, style, measurements, and computation. The open source JSMol program is used for viewing these models. Another feature offers 3D when viewed with Red/Cyan, Red/Green or Red/Blue glasses, allowing for unique visualization of a molecule with depth perception.
  • The ChemIDplus structure box now uses quick-loading Marvin for JavaScript (free; requires IE9 or above). The Marvin Applet version is also available in a pull-down for legacy browsers.
  • ChemIDplus is now IPhone IOS and Android OS friendly. Buttons collapse to neatly fit the phone screen, and the structures can be displayed.