Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About PSR | Contact PSR | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for the ‘NLM Resources’ Category

Webinars and Workshops about Outreach Evaluation!

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) offers a range of webinars and workshops upon request by network members and coordinators from the NN/LM regions. Take a look at the list and see if one of the options appeals to you. To request a workshop or webinar, contact Susan Barnes. The workshops were designed as face-to-face learning opportunities, but can be tailored to meet distance learning needs by distilling them to briefer webinars or offering them in series of one-hour webinars. If you don’t see what you’re looking for on the list, then contact Susan and let her know!

Patient Safety Awareness Week: March 2-8, 2014!

March 2-8, 2014, is Patient Safety Awareness Week, established by the National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF), which supports “Creating a world where patients and those who care for them are free from harm.” The National Library of Medicine (NLM) supports the work to keep patients and healthcare providers free from harm by making available quality health information. Following is information from the NLM MedlinePlus Patient Safety health topic Web page that describes actions patients can take:

You can help prevent medical errors by being an active member of your health care team. Research shows that patients who are more involved with their care tend to get better results. To reduce the risk of medical errors, you can:

  • Ask questions if you have doubts or concerns. Take a relative or friend to your doctor appointment to help you ask questions and understand answers.
  • Make sure you understand what will happen if you need surgery.
  • Tell your health care provider(s) about all the medicines you take, including over-the-counter drugs and dietary supplements. Tell them if you have any allergies or bad reactions to anesthesia. Make sure you know how to take your medications correctly.
  • Get a second opinion about treatment options.
  • Keep a copy of your own health history.

Three Million Articles are Now in PMC!

PMC logoAs of February 21, 2014, PMC (formerly known as PubMed Central) became home to three million articles! PMC is a free archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature at the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s National Library of Medicine. The content has been provided in part by 1,445 full participation journals, 277 NIH Portfolio journals, and 2,477 selective deposit journals. PMC hit the one million milestone in 2007, and the two million milestone in 2010. Congratulations PMC!

New DIMRC Topic Page: Influenza Pandemic Preparedness and Response!

A new topic page is available from the NLM Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC), Influenza: Pandemic Preparedness and Response. The page focuses on flu outbreaks that exceed the predicted prevalence of seasonal flu, threaten to overwhelm medical resources, and could affect the everyday functioning of communities. The page highlights resources that health professionals and emergency planners may find useful in planning for and responding to pandemics; an important part of all-hazards planning for many institutions and government agencies. DIMRC provides topic pages on a wide range of disaster types and related topics, including a page on Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus.

Trials in PubMed Linking to Systematic Reviews

PubMed Health’s curated collection of systematic reviews now has an important new role: enabling PubMed users to go straight from a clinical trial to systematic reviews that have considered it. Visitors to records of many thousands of trials will now see a new section to the right, called a portlet. It will show links to systematic reviews in PubMed that have cited that trial. This new portlet does not replace “Related citations in PubMed”: that will follow as usual. All of PubMed Health’s 31,100 systematic reviews since 2003 are not yet included. If there is no portlet showing, it does not mean for certain that there is no systematic review that includes the trial. There are enough reviews included, though, that this portlet should become a familiar sight when using PubMed. For additional information, visit the latest issue of the NLM Technical Bulletin.

National Library of Medicine (NLM) has Updated Haz-Map with 481 New Agents

Screenshot of Haz-Map homepageHaz-Map now covers over 9170 chemical and biological agents and 241 occupational diseases! NLM has updated Haz-Map with 481 new agents, including 23 agents causing occupational asthma. Fifteen new hazardous job tasks linked to jobs and industries were also added in this update.

Haz-Map is an occupational health database designed for health and safety professionals and for consumers seeking information about the health effects of exposure to chemicals and biologicals at work. Haz-Map links jobs and hazardous tasks with occupational diseases and their symptoms. It currently covers over 5997 chemical and biological agents and 235 occupational diseases.

Newly Released Entrez Direct from NCBI!

NCBI has just released Entrez Direct, a new software suite that allows you to use the UNIX command line to directly access NCBI’s data servers, as well as parse and format data to create customized data files. The latest NCBI News story discusses Entrez Direct and gives several examples of how the programs may be used, as well as links to the suite on FTP and documentation. Entrez Direct is available as a simple FTP download and has extensive documentation on the NCBI web site.

Classroom Activities and Lesson Plans for NLM Native Voices Exhibition

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Division of Specialized Information Services K-12 Workgroup has released classroom activities and lesson plans to supplement the Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness web site. For grades 6-12, these classroom activities and lesson plans familiarize students to the health and medicine of Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. The activities and lesson plans use Native Voices exhibition web site content material and other NLM online educational/science resources.

The activities and lesson plans are composed of four units. Each unit introduces a different way of exploring and learning about the Native Voices exhibition in about 1.5 to 3 hours. These units are: 1) A scavenger hunt, 2) An environmental health science lesson, 3) A social science lesson, and 4) A biology lesson. While the activities and lesson plans can be used in science classrooms, clubs, and programs, they can be used also to reinforce the history and societal developments of Native peoples in social science and history classrooms.

The Native Voices Web site allows people to experience an exhibition currently on display at NLM in Bethesda, Maryland. Both versions explore the connection between wellness, illness, and cultural life through a combination of interviews with Native people and interactive media. For additional information, contact Alla Keselman, PhD, K-12 Team Leader, National Library of Medicine.

NLM to Promote infoSIDA & Latino Health Awareness on Valentine’s Day

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) will be promoting the infoSIDA website through a multi-platform media outreach effort culminating in a Twitter discussion on Valentine’s Day. The outreach efforts include two radio public service announcements that will air on Spanish radio stations nationwide. In addition, Fedora Braverman and Jean-Paul Rock will serve as the main NLM Spanish spokespersons, conducting interviews on infoSIDA and other Spanish-language consumer resources from NLM. Both will be featured on Bienvenidos a América (BAA), a weekly call-in radio show focused on providing immigration resources to Latinos. BAA airs weekly on Thursdays from 11am-12pm Pacific Time and is on 111 Spanish stations nationwide.

In addition to being on the air, the NLM specific segment on BAA will be streamed live on Thursday, January 30th online at bienvenidosradio.com. Finally, the online resources of infoSIDA will be shared and discussed in a Twitter “Tweet Up” on February 14, 2014, Valentine’s Day. NLM will be inviting all Latino-serving institutions, health and AIDS service organizations to participate and share resources for how to continue to keep loved ones healthy. Valentine’s Day is the holiday where we remind loved ones of how much we care about them and their well-being. This holiday serves as the perfect backdrop to raise awareness about health issues affecting our loved ones and the resources that are available to learn more about prevention and treatment. Twitter users are invited to follow or join the conversation by using the hash tag #infoSIDA2014.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 22% of the diagnoses of HIV infection among adults and adolescents in the United States and six dependent areas (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Republic of Palau, and the US Virgin Islands) from 2008 to 2011 were in Hispanics/Latinos. The rate of new HIV infections among Latino men is almost three times that of white men (39.9 vs. 15.9 per 100,000), and the rate among Latinas is more than four times that of white women (11.8 vs. 2.6 per 100,000). Statistics like these and a need to reach vulnerable populations were a driving force in NLM recognizing the need to speak directly to Latinos on the issue of HIV/AIDS, in a culturally relevant manner.


NLM Director Donald A.B. Lindberg Receives 2014 Paul Evan Peters Award!

The Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), and EDUCAUSE have announced that Donald A.B. Lindberg, Director of the National Library of Medicine, has been named the 2014 recipient of the Paul Evan Peters Award. The award recognizes notable, lasting achievements in the creation and innovative use of network-based information resources and services that advance scholarship and intellectual productivity. Named for CNI’s founding director, the award honors the memory and accomplishments of Paul Evan Peters (1947–1996), a visionary and a coalition builder in higher education and the world of scholarly communication, who led CNI from its founding in 1990. The award will be presented during the CNI membership meeting in St. Louis, MO, to be held March 31–April 1, 2014, where Dr. Lindberg will deliver the Paul Evan Peters Memorial Lecture. The talk will be recorded and made available on CNI’s YouTube and Vimeo channels after the meeting concludes.

Dr. Lindberg’s interest in the potential intersection between information technology and the biological sciences stretches back to the early days of his career. He joined the pathology faculty at the University of Missouri in 1960, where he developed the first automated lab system and an automated patient history acquisition system. He implemented an automated statewide system for interpreting electrocardiograms, as well as other medical applications for the computer. Around this time, he also began publishing articles in a field that would come to be known as medical informatics, including The Computer and Medical Care, which appeared in 1968.

Dr. Lindberg has worked as a scientist for over 50 years, becoming widely recognized as an innovator in applying computer technology to health care, medical diagnosis, artificial intelligence, and educational programs. In 1984 he was appointed director of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the world’s largest biomedical library, a post that he still holds. As NLM’s Director, Dr. Lindberg convinced the United States Congress that the Library was an essential information conduit, facilitating the decision-making process of scientists and pharmaceutical companies, and, ultimately, benefiting patients and the general public, thereby securing the organization’s robust future. He has spearheaded countless transformative programs in medical informatics, including the Unified Medical Language System, making it possible to link health information, medical terms, drug names and billing codes across different computer systems; the Visible Human Project, a digital image library of complete, anatomically detailed, three-dimensional representations of the normal male and female human bodies; the production and implementation of ClinicalTrials.gov, a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants conducted around the world; and, the establishment of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, a national resource for molecular biology information and genetic processes that control health and disease. Today, NLM has a budget of $327 million, more than 800 employees, and digital information services that are used billions of times a year by millions of scientists, health professionals, and members of the public.

Dr. Lindberg is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and has received numerous honors and awards, including the prestigious Morris F. Collen, MD, Award of Excellence of the American College of Medical Informatics, and the Surgeon General’s Medallion of the US Public Health Service. He received his medical degree from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, and an undergraduate degree from Amherst College. A four-member committee selected Dr. Lindberg for the award: the late Ann J. Wolpert, director of libraries at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; George O. Strawn, director of the Federal Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) National Coordination Office (NCO); Sally Jackson, professor of communication at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and Joan Lippincott, associate executive director of the Coalition for Networked Information.