Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About PSR | Contact PSR | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for the ‘News & Reports’ Category

NLM Releases Rare Footage of President Franklin Roosevelt Speaking at NIH

On October 31, 1940, just days before President Franklin D. Roosevelt would be elected to an unprecedented third term as President of the United States, he traveled to Bethesda to dedicate the National Cancer Institute and the new campus of what was then the National Institute of Health (NIH), before it would eventually become known in plural form, National Institutes of Health, as multiple units were established over subsequent years. That late October afternoon, Roosevelt stood on the steps of the new main NIH building, ready to address a crowd of 3,000 people. Still relevant today, in a variety of contexts, are the subjects he discussed: the need for preparedness in light of war and for research into deadly diseases, recent improvements in public health and health care, and hope that the research conducted at NIH would lead to new cures for and even the prevention of disease.

The National Library of Medicine is making the film of Roosevelt’s speech publicly available online for the first time, nearly 74 years after the President made his speech. Sound recordings, transcripts, and photographs of this event have been publicly available for many years. Research suggests, however, that this rare film footage has not been seen publicly since its recording and may no longer exist anywhere else. The recording does not appear to have been professionally produced, since the camera is unsteady in places, a hand sweeps across the lens, and the filming starts and stops, though it isn’t known whether this is a result of the original filming or of later editing. The film is publicly available via the NLM’s Digital Collections archive of over 10,000 biomedical books and videos, and its YouTube site. Read more about this historically significant film footage on the NLM blog, Circulating Now: From the Historical Collections of the World’s Largest Biomedical Library.

Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Data Book: A Report to the Communities

Cover of Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Data BookA comprehensive health and lifestyle analysis of people from a range of Hispanic/Latino origins shows that this segment of the U.S. population is diverse, not only in ancestry, culture, and economic status; but also in the prevalence of several diseases, risk factors, and lifestyle habits. These health data are derived from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), a landmark study that enrolled about 16,415 Hispanic/Latino adults living in San Diego, Chicago, Miami, and the Bronx, N.Y., who self-identified with Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, or South American origins. These new findings have been compiled and published as the Hispanic Community Health Study Data Book: A Report to the Communities.

The numerous findings described by the HCHS/SOL researchers confirmed some existing knowledge while also uncovering some new health trends. Among the items highlighting Hispanic diversity:

  • The percentage of people who reported having asthma ranged from 7.4 (among those of Mexican ancestry) to 35.8 (among those of Puerto Rican ancestry).
  • The percentage of individuals with hypertension ranged from 20.3 (South American) to 32.2 (Cuban).
  • The percentage of people eating five or more servings of fruits/vegetables daily ranged from 19.2 (Puerto Rican origin) to 55.0 (Cuban origin). Also, men reported consuming more fruit and vegetables than women.
  • Women reported a much lower consumption of sodium than men among all Hispanic groups represented in the study.

The full report, in English and Spanish, is available on the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute website.

USC Center for the Digital Future Releases 11th Digital Future Project Report!

On June 13, The University of Southern California (USC) Annenberg Center for the Digital Future released the 11th Digital Future Project Report, the longest continuing study of its kind, which includes findings on more than 180 issues that explore the views and behavior of Internet users and non-users. The 2013 report features new questions about negative online attention (bullying, harassment, and unwanted sexual attention), the impact of mobile devices, and a closer examination of the “Millennial Rift;” the vast differences between how Millennials (age 18-34) and non-Millennials use online sites and services. A press release with highlights from the report is available, and the complete report is available for downloading.

Tracking the news on Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV)

The earlier, commonly used term “novel coronavirus” or “NCoV” is being superseded by the newly designated term “Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV).” The Coronavirus Study Group, International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, announced the new terminology, which is being adopted by the World Health Organization (WHO) and other groups. When searching for information on this virus, it may be useful to use both the old and new terms, as well as other terms that have been used to describe the virus; including human betacoronavirus 2c EMC, human betacoronavirus 2c England-Qatar, human betacoronavirus 2C Jordan-N3, or betacoronavirus England 1. One caveat is that searching PubMed with the term “coronavirus” will retrieve many citations related to the 2002-03 SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) outbreak, since the SARS virus and MERS-CoV are both coronaviruses. Following are key resources for tracking MERS-CoV news:

National Strategy for Suicide Prevention

Cover image of National Strategy for Suicide Prevention report On September 10, 2012, the Action Alliance, along with the U.S. Surgeon General, Dr. Regina Benjamin, released the revised National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (NSSP). The revised strategy emphasizes the role every American can play in protecting their friends, family members, and colleagues from suicide. It also provides guidance for schools, businesses, health systems, clinicians, and many other sectors that takes into account nearly a decade of research and other advancements in the field since the last strategy was published.

The NSSP features 13 goals and 60 objectives, with the themes that suicide prevention should:

  • Foster positive public dialogue; counter shame, prejudice, and silence; and build public support for suicide prevention;
  • Address the needs of vulnerable groups, be tailored to the cultural and situational contexts in which they are offered, and seek to eliminate disparities;
  • Be coordinated and integrated with existing efforts addressing health and behavioral health, and ensure continuity of care;
  • Promote changes in systems, policies, and environments that will support and facilitate the prevention of suicide and related problems;
  • Bring together public health and behavioral health;
  • Promote efforts to reduce access to lethal means among individuals with identified suicide risks;
  • Apply the most up-to-date knowledge base for suicide prevention.

The overview, full report, fact sheet, and public service announcement are available on the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention website.

New Discussion Paper: Attributes of a Health Literate Organization

What is a Health Literate Organization?

In January 2012, participants in a workgroup of the Institutes of Medicine (IOM) Roundtable on Health Literacy published a discussion paper titled “Attributes of a Health Literate Organization.”

This paper describes ten attributes of a health literate organization, with examples for each attribute.  Health literate organizations will make it “easier for people to navigate, understand, and use information and services to take care of their health.”

The authors underscore the importance of addressing health literacy at an organizational level, along with guidelines for various types of health care organizations. The paper concludes with a list of highly relevant resources that will be useful to anyone interested in this topic.

To see the detailed list of attributes and examples, please visit www.iom.edu/healthlit10attributes.  A PDF of the discussion paper can be downloaded here.

2010 Census Shows Asians are Fastest-Growing Race Group

The U.S. Census Bureau has just released a 2010 Census brief, The Asian Population: 2010, showing that the Asian population grew faster than any other racial or ethnic group over the last decade, to more than 17 million, more than four times the rate of growth for the U.S. population as a whole. The report noted the population surge for those identifying as Asian, either alone or in combination with one or more other races, of 45.6% from 2000 to 2010, while those who identified as Asian alone grew by 43.3%. The total U.S. population increased by 9.7% from 2000 to 2010. The Asian alone-or-in-combination population grew by at least 30% in all states except Hawaii, which had an 11% increase. Other highlights of the report showed that the states with the highest proportions of the Asian alone-or-in-combination population were in the West and the Northeast. The Asian alone-or-in-combination population represented 57% of the total population in Hawaii. California had the next highest proportion at 15%. For U.S. cities, New York had the largest Asian alone-or-in-combination population with 1.1 million, followed by Los Angeles with 484,000 and San Jose at 327,000. Three other cities — San Francisco, San Diego, and Honolulu — had Asian alone-or-in-combination populations of more than 200,000 people. The ranking was identical for the Asian alone population. The places with a total population of 100,000 or more with the greatest proportion of the Asian alone-or-in-combination population were Honolulu at 68%, and nine California cities; including Daly City (58%), Fremont (55%), Sunnyvale (44%), Irvine (43%), Santa Clara (41%), Garden Grove (39%), Torrance (38%), San Francisco (36%) and San Jose (35%). The rising Asian population was due mainly to immigration arrivals from throughout the Asian Pacific region and Indian subcontinent. Additional information is available from the U.S. Census news release.

Midday at the Oasis Update!

Midday at the Oasis is held monthly on the third Wednesday of the month at 1 pm Pacific Time. The sessions are recorded and captioned for accessibility. The previous sessions are listed on our Archive page.

The next Midday will be on February 15th. The speaker is Caitlin Sticco, an NLM 2nd year Associate Fellow, who will cover the development of a prototype tool for partially automating gene indexing called the Gene Indexing Assistant.

To attend Midday, please register at http://www.tinyurl.com/psrclasses/! or here.

Future Midday topics will cover Evidenced-based Practice, e-Science and PubMed Health.  To suggest a topic, send an email to Kay Deeney, Educational Services Coordinator at kdeeney@library.ucla.edu.

 

IOM Report – Adverse Effects of Vaccines: Evidence and Causality

The Institute of Medicine of the National Academies has released a new report, Adverse Effects of Vaccines: Evidence and Causality. This IOM report has received a lot of press through a Reuters article by Julie Steenhuysen. The IOM reviewed a list of adverse events associated with eight vaccines to evaluate the scientific evidence about the event-vaccine relationship. They found that side effects or “adverse effects” associated with some vaccines were generally very rare or minor, and some adverse events following a vaccine may be due to coincidence and are not caused by the vaccine. As Steenhuysen put it, “vaccines [are] largely safe”.

Adverse Effects of Vaccines: Evidence and Causality“, is available for free, along with all National Academies Press PDF books and reports.

NLM and NN/LM National Cooperative Medical Journals Print Retention Program

Publishers have been shifting their journal publishing model from print to electronic journals over the past decade. The online availability of full-text articles proved very attractive to library patrons as medical students, clinicians, and researchers could get immediate access to their preferred titles from their desktops. Since 2000, medical libraries throughout the United States have increasingly shifted their journal subscriptions from the traditional print to the electronic journal version to meet user expectations of immediate access to material 24 hours a day.

While the shift to electronic journals has eased the pressure on the limited physical space in libraries, libraries increasingly have come under pressure to give up physical space to other areas of their parent organizations. As a result, libraries have had to discard the print holdings of some, many or all of their journal titles – limiting them to the years/volumes available online.

Some publishers have been working on converting the earlier print issues to electronic format through various means, but not all titles, and not all volumes. Libraries with a current subscription to the electronic version generally still have to purchase these backfiles of scanned print volumes – regardless of their previous print subscription. Furthermore, future access to backfiles at some publisher sites cannot be guaranteed.

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) and the National Library of Medicine (NLM) are working to ensure the preservation and continued access to the historical literature through a new national cooperative medical journals print retention program. For the entire article about the national cooperative medical journals print retention program, please visit the NLM Technical Bulletin.