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Archive for the ‘Mobile Devices’ Category

MyMedList Now Available from the NLM Gallery of Mobile Apps and Sites!

MyMedListMyMedList (MML) has been released as a free Apple iOS app on the NLM Gallery of Mobile Apps and Sites. MML, developed by the National Library of Medicine, is designed to maintain a record of an individual’s current and past medications, which is easily accessible and adequately protected. MyMedList allows users to electronically manage their medication list(s), and control access to their personal information. The medication list can be printed out to share, mailed to a relative, serve as a reminder to the individual for taking medications, or be shown as reference information in doctors’ offices or hospitals. The app is based on standards; MML follows the HL7 standard for CDA/CCD and uses RxNorm data for prescription medications.

Edit: MyMedList is no longer being actively maintained and was removed from the iTunes. (1/13/14 LT)

NLM Launches “People Locator” for the 2012 Philippine Floods

In response to the recent torrential rains in the Phillipines, which have submerged Manila and surrounding areas, the National Library of Medicine has launched the web site, People Locator for the 2012 Philippine Floods. The Lister Hill Center, an R&D division of the National Library of Medicine, developed People Locator, a web site to post photos and name, age, etc. for missing (or found) people by hospital staff, relief workers, or family members. It can be searched by the public and by relief workers who are assisting with family reunification efforts. The site is designed to receive information through the Web, an iPhone/iPodTouch/iPad app, and from other sites such as Google Person Finder. The underlying app is ReUnite, which is available at no cost. Missing persons’ photos and identifying information can be added through any of these channels.

Google Crisis Response has also activated Google Person Finder for the floods in the Philippines, in English and Filipino. The English-language Google home page is also available. NLM’s People Locator and the Google Person Finder share information, so that missing persons are then listed in both places. Additional information about the US government response to the flooding is available from the USAID home page for the Philippines and the US Embassy in Manila. The embassy is closed until at least August 9.

PubMed for Handhelds App Available!

PubMed for Handhelds (PubMed4Hh) app is now available for free in the iTunes store.

This is an alternative to saving the PubMed for Handhelds web site as a mobile site. Remember to check out the NLM Gallery of Mobile Apps and Sites to see what’s newly listed!

Mobile Guide to NLM Mobile Apps and Sites!

NLM Mobile Apps and SitesThe National Library of Medicine (NLM) has released a new mobile website that is intended to serve as the authoritative guide to NLM mobile resources. This website will improve your ability to find and use NLM mobile apps and sites. This HTML 5 mobile website is available in web browsers on many mobile devices. Information on all NLM mobile resources will be available through this website. To explore the website, visit http://www.nlm.nih.gov/mobile-app/ on a mobile device such as an iPhone, iPad, Android smart phone, Blackberry, or Microsoft phone. The entry for each resource will include a brief description, descriptive tag(s), image, and a link to install the app or launch the web site. Additional information is available in the NLM Technical Bulletin. NLM welcomes your feedback about this new service. You can either Contact NLM with feedback, or use the “Contact Us” link in the footer of the app.

Introducing WISER for iOS 3.0, with Native Support for the iPad

Screenshot of WISER Identify ChemicalWISER for iOS 3.0, a universal app for Apple iOS devices, is now available. WISER is a system designed to assist first responders in hazardous material incidents. WISER provides a wide range of information on hazardous substances, including substance identification support, physical characteristics, human health information, and containment and suppression advice. This new release adds native support for the iPad, in addition to support for the iPhone and iPod touch. New and updated features include:

Search WISER’s full set of known substances on the iPad: WISER’s full database of chemical, biological, and radiological substances is now available on the iPad. This includes trusted information for over 440 substances from NLM’s Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB).

Employ WISER’s popular Help Identify Chemical capability on the iPad: WISER for iOS touch includes a fully featured implementation of Help Identify Chemical, allowing a user to identify a chemical using physical properties, signs/symptoms, categorization, NFPA placards, and transportation containers. Users can save a help identify search for later recall and freely search the result list using any supported identifier.

Use WISER’s protective distance mapping feature on your iPad: Using a live map, visualize protective distance data for a given substance directly on your iPad. Track both your current position and the location of a plotted protective distance area. Note that WISER must have permission to use location services to track your current location. The accuracy of this capability is affected by the capabilities of your device (note that not all iOS devices include a GPS).

WISER for iOS is available for free and can be installed through the iTunes App Store. In addition, WISER is available as a standalone website and mobile website, a downloadable programs for Windows, and as downloadable apps for iOS, Android, Windows Mobile, BlackBerry, and Palm OS.

Several additional updates are expected in the near future:

  • Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management (CHEMM) integration.
  • Updates to WISER’s Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG) content to the newly released 2012 edition.
  • WISER for Android 3.0, which adds Help Identify Chemical and protective distance mapping to this popular platform.

NLM Drug Information Portal Now Available for Mobile Devices!

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Drug Information Portal is now available for mobile devices. This mobile optimized web site covers over 32,000 drugs and provides descriptions, drug names, pharmaceutical categories, and structural diagrams. Each record also features information links to 19 other resources; including NLM PubMed, NLM LactMed, and Drugs@FDA. The mobile version of a resource is used when available. Smart phones accessing the main Drug Portal site will be taken to the mobile site.

The Drug Information Portal is a free Web resource from the NLM that provides an informative, user-friendly gateway to current drug information for over 32,000 drugs. Links to sources span the breadth of the NLM, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and other government agencies. Current information regarding consumer health, clinical trials, AIDS–related drug information, MeSH pharmacological actions, PubMed biomedical literature, and physical properties and structure, is easily retrieved by searching on a drug name. A varied selection of focused topics in medicine and drug–related information is also available from displayed subject headings.

National Library of Medicine Releases Free iPad App, “Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness”

The splash page for the NLM Native Voices app shows the exhibition logo and four of the featured interview subjects.To give those who can’t travel to Bethesda, Maryland to see it in person a lively virtual experience, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) announces a new, free iPad app that captures the contents of its popular exhibition, Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness, currently on display. NLM is the world’s largest medical library and a component of the National Institutes of Health.

The app lets users explore video interviews with tribal elders, healers and other prominent people who practice traditional medicine, Western medicine or a combination of both. From their unique experiences and perspectives, they weave a tapestry of stories of the vibrant and diverse cultures of and medicine ways practiced by Alaska Natives, Native Americans and Native Hawaiians. Other video clips provide an exhibition overview and highlights of the 4,400-mile journey of a totem pole specially crafted for the exhibition, from Washington state to the NIH campus in Bethesda.

The NLM Native Voices app works on all iPads with iOS4.2 and higher. The free app is available for download from the Apple iTunes store.

Seven iPad Keyboard Tricks

Dan Miller, editor of Macworld.com, recently posted a video illustrating seven keyboard tricks that are helpful for every iPad user. A complete transcript and video link are featured in this MacWorld.com article. The seven tips are summarized below. Tips 1 and 3-6 also work on the iPhone.

  1. Tap-and-hold for special characters. Tapping and holding on any vowel key and several consonants results in a pop-up to select variations on those characters, including accents and circumflexes. This is particularly useful for typing in languages other than English. Similarly, tapping and holding on several keys on the numeric keyboard accesses other special characters. For example, tap-and-hold on the dollar sign to see a variety of currency symbols.
  2. Swipe up on some keys to insert special characters. For example, swipe up on the dollar sign to get the cents symbol.
  3. Double-tap on the space bar at the end of a sentence to automatically insert a period and a space. Then begin the next sentence.
  4. In Safari, to get to a site that has a top-level domain other than .com, tap-and-hold on the .COM key to see a pop-up to select .ORG, .EDU, and other domains.
  5. Similarly, in Mail, to add a top-level domain at the end of an email address, tap-and-hold on the period; then select the top-level domain desired.
  6. To insert a number or punctuation mark after typing a string of letters, open the numeric keyboard and slide your finger to the number desired. Then release the finger to return to the alpha keyboard.
  7. Lastly, there’s the feature to split the keyboard and undock it. Tap-and-hold on the keyboard button in the lower right, and select “Undock.” Then slide the keyboard up and down to different positions on the screen. By tapping and holding the keyboard button and selecting “Split,” the keyboard will split in two. This is very handy when holding the iPad with two hands and typing with the thumbs.

New Release of WISER for iPhone/iPod Touch Now Available!

Version 2.0 for WISER for iPhone/iPod touch is now available for downloading directly from the Apple App Store. The release includes the following two new highly requested features:

  • The full implementation of WISER’s Help Identify Chemical capability is now available on the iOS platform, allowing a user to identify a chemical using physical properties of the substance, signs and symptoms of victims of exposure, categorization of the substance, hazard values from NFPA 704 placards, and identification of transportation containers. For the first time, users can now save a help identify search for later recall and freely search the result list using any supported identifier.
  • Use WISER’s protective distance mapping feature on your iPhone or iPod touch. Visualize the areas likely to be affected during the first 30 minutes after a substance is spilled or released, on a live map. The Department of Transportation’s Emergency Response Guidebook is the source of WISER’s protective distance data.

Reviews are always appreciated. If you have feedback about the latest WISER enhancements, please consider leaving a comment on the App store!

The latest release of WebWISER has been updated to include protective distance mapping, providing the ability to overlay the protective distance data for a WISER substance on an interactive map.

The following WISER developments are expected in the coming months:

  • Universal iOS (iPad) support
  • WISER for Android 2.0, which adds Help Identify Chemical and protective distance mapping to this popular platform

NLM’s 175th Anniversary: Reflections from the Director

U.S. Medicine is a publication serving healthcare professionals working in the Department of Veterans Affairs, Department of Defense and U.S. Public Health Service. It provides a mix of news, medical updates, interviews, reports on special government topics and monthly columns. In the recently published special issue, This Year in Federal Medicine – Outlook 2012, National Library of Medicine Director Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg, MD, took the opportunity to acknowledge and celebrate NLM’s 175 years of public service, and to look ahead to 2012 and beyond. He began by reviewing the enormous amount of electronic information generated through resources such as PubMed and MedlinePlus. He also acknowledged the role of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine in promoting access to health information throughout the U.S., and the support and training that NLM provides in the areas of biomedical informatics and health information technology. Dr. Lindberg also addressed the emerging opportunities to link NLM’s health information resources with electronic health records. Even though Dr. Lindberg expects budgetary challenges for NLM in 2012 and beyond, his outlook for the future remains very positive, as he envisions that NLM’s range of services will continue to expand into new areas of biomedical research and health care.

Specific themes mentioned by Dr. Lindberg in his future outlook include the continuing growth of NLM resources, such as PubMed/MEDLINE, PubMed Central, and ClinicalTrials.gov. In addition, several new NLM resources will be released in 2012, including a Genetic Testing Registry and a database of clinical significant human genetic variants. Dr. Lindberg also expects the continued development of NLM resources related to disaster preparedness, and he noted the recent deployment of these resources in events such as the Gulf Oil Spill, and the earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Dr. Lindberg also expects that NLM will continue to utilize and expand the range of social media tools, mobile applications, and mobile versions of its resources to reach new and diverse audiences with high quality health information. He mentioned the impressive array of social media currently used by NLM, including 13 Twitter feeds, notably @medlineplus and the Spanish-language version @medlineplusesp, six Facebook pages and a new YouTube channel. The full text of Dr. Lindberg’s remarks is available on the U.S. Medicine web site.