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Archive for the ‘General’ Category

Qualitative Data Visualization

An innovative and compelling approach to creating qualitative data visualizations with illustrations is provided by Fresh Spectrum. The process begins by taking a long narrative such as a focus group transcription, and chunking it into a few paragraphs per concept with a unique illustration for each one. One option is to use your organization’s existing images or Creative Commons-licensed images for illustrating concepts. The next step for the visualization uses the images with brief captions as an online data dashboard, where visitors can click on the captioned image of interest to them to access the more detailed narrative. One example describes how to do this within a WordPress portfolio blog template, or a simpler strategy of creating HTML anchor links to each individual section within a longer text, which then leads to the longer narrative.

The NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) has more resources available from the Reporting and Visualizing tab of the OERC Tools and Resources for Evaluation Guide.

NLM Releases Rare Footage of President Franklin Roosevelt Speaking at NIH

On October 31, 1940, just days before President Franklin D. Roosevelt would be elected to an unprecedented third term as President of the United States, he traveled to Bethesda to dedicate the National Cancer Institute and the new campus of what was then the National Institute of Health (NIH), before it would eventually become known in plural form, National Institutes of Health, as multiple units were established over subsequent years. That late October afternoon, Roosevelt stood on the steps of the new main NIH building, ready to address a crowd of 3,000 people. Still relevant today, in a variety of contexts, are the subjects he discussed: the need for preparedness in light of war and for research into deadly diseases, recent improvements in public health and health care, and hope that the research conducted at NIH would lead to new cures for and even the prevention of disease.

The National Library of Medicine is making the film of Roosevelt’s speech publicly available online for the first time, nearly 74 years after the President made his speech. Sound recordings, transcripts, and photographs of this event have been publicly available for many years. Research suggests, however, that this rare film footage has not been seen publicly since its recording and may no longer exist anywhere else. The recording does not appear to have been professionally produced, since the camera is unsteady in places, a hand sweeps across the lens, and the filming starts and stops, though it isn’t known whether this is a result of the original filming or of later editing. The film is publicly available via the NLM’s Digital Collections archive of over 10,000 biomedical books and videos, and its YouTube site. Read more about this historically significant film footage on the NLM blog, Circulating Now: From the Historical Collections of the World’s Largest Biomedical Library.

American Evaluation Association’s Potent Presentation Information

The American Evaluation Association (AEA) sponsors a Potent Presentations Initiative (p2i) that has a stated purpose of helping evaluators improve their presentation skills, both within a conference setting and as part of individual practice. P2i challenges evaluators to hone in on three concepts: Their message, their design, and their delivery.

There are a wealth of handouts available as PDF files, Word documents, and Powerpoint presentations available from the p2i tools website that sometimes include AEA conference specifications in addition to many great messaging, designing and delivery principles. For an example of each principle be sure to check out the Presentation Preparation Checklist, How to Design a Research Poster, and the Delivery Glue Handout.

NN/LM OERC Announces New Webinar: “Evaluation 2.0!”

The NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) has developed the new webinar Evaluation 2.0: Trends, New Ideas, Cool Tools,” which debuted on August 21 as one of the NN/LM Greater Midwest Region’s monthly Lake Effect webinars. The new webinar presents emerging trends in evaluation practice that emphasize stakeholder interaction and social engagement. It also covers popular tools and methods that allow you to draw others into the evaluation process and raise the visibility of your program or services. A recording of the one-hour session is available for viewing.

Designing Library Data Dashboards with Tableau Software

At this month’s Library Assessment Conference held in Seattle, one panel featured assessment librarians presenting data dashboards they created using Tableau software, Tableau Unleashed: Visualizing Library Data. This presentation includes views of dashboards from University of British Columbia Library (by presenter Jeremy Buhler), UMass Amherst Libraries (by Rachel Lewellen), and Ohio State Libraries (by Sarah Murphy). All of the presenters used Tableau software to produce their dashboards.

Tableau may be the most popular software for creating dashboards right now and the company offers a free version that has a great deal of functionality. In fact, at least one presenter (Sarah Murphy) included dashboards she created using Tableau Public. However, users must be cautioned that any data entered into Tableau Public become public information. That means anyone can see and download your raw data. So, if you use it, be sure all identifying information about individuals is stripped from your files and that you are comfortable with other people downloading your raw data. The presenters also mentioned tips for dashboard design. For additional design guidance, check out the freely downloadable resource A Guide to Creating Dashboards People Love to Use by Juice Analytics.

Logic Models for Library Assessment Planning

The Engaged Librarian: Crafting an Effective Assessment Plan to Determine the Impact of a Key Strategic Library Initiative, by Sarah Murphy at The Ohio State University (OSU), was presented during the 2014 Library Assessment Conference, held earlier this month in Seattle, WA. The presentation provided an overview to the use of a logic model as part of library strategic planning. The project incorporated the theory of change methodology with logic models and used the Kellogg Foundation Logic Model as a template. They storyboarded data within a data dashboard that was both aligned with and broken down by the applicable OSU strategic vision goals. Ms. Murphy reported that the benefits of using a logic model approach included having a flexible but structured way to do library assessment planning, having a collaborative and inclusive approach, creating a project focus, being able to assess linear and iterative programs and services, and the ability to communicate program accomplishments in interesting ways. During the question and answer session they noted they are also Tableau fans and like to create data structures in their dashboard to avoid information silos.

To learn more about logic models and data dashboards, check out the freely available NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) Evaluation Guides, especially Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Projects. Also available is a recording of the one-hour presentation Data Dashboards: Monitoring Progress toward Program Outcomes, part of the NN/LM PSR Midday at the Oasis webinar series.

ALA Publishes Guide for Conducting Community Conversations

The American Library Association has announced the release of Community Conversation Workbook, a resource developed for the ALA’s Libraries Transforming Communities (LTC) initiative, which provides librarians with training and resources to enhance their roles as community leaders and change-agents. The initiative’s goal is to help librarians promote the visibility and value of their libraries within their communities. Public discussions are promoted as key community engagement strategies. The workbook provides invaluable guidance to anyone who wants to conduct discussion groups for community assessment purposes. It provides practical advice on every aspect of convening group discussions, including tips on participant recruitment, a list of discussion questions, facilitator guidelines, note-taking tools, and templates for organizing key findings.

Demonstrating value is currently of considerable interest to many libraries and organizations. Such organizations may be interested in exploring other articles and resources related to the LTC initiative, which are available on the LTC web page. Examples showing how libraries are implementing LTC activities are available from the initiative’s digital portal.

Free Online Course–Shaping Outcomes: Making a Difference in Libraries and Museums

Shaping Outcomes: Making a Difference in Libraries and Museums is available as a free online course that learners can start anytime and work on at their own self-navigated pace. While there are library and museum-specific examples provided in the course, the concepts of learning more about target audience needs, how to clarify desired results, developing logic models, and evaluating outcomes are applicable for most any organization’s outreach projects. Modules of the class are broken into five sections; Overview, Plan, Build, Evaluate, and Report, with a helpful Glossary to learn outcomes-based planning and evaluation (OBPE) terminology, and a Logic Model template. Shaping Outcomes was developed by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and Indiana University/Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) and previously was available as an instructor-led class.

More information specific to developing logic models in health information outreach programs is available from NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) Booklet Two: Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Projects. Additional information is available on the OERC Evaluation Guides page.

Visualization Literacy

With an increase of technology tools available for data reporting and visualization sometimes it’s challenging to know how to best use them to clearly communicate the intended meaning of the data. The concept of visualization literacy and a broader theme of visual literacy are often not included as part of the instructions guiding people in the steps to create their own visualization design. A recent entry by Andrew Kirk on the blog of Seeing Data, a research project in the United Kingdom studying how people understand big data visualizations shown in the media, offers a great review of 8 Articles Discussing Visual and Visualization Literacy that are freely available and well worth a read to better understand both visual and visualization literacy. Their featured articles include resources ranging from the importance of Visual Literacy in an Age of Data to How to Be an Educated Consumer of Infographics, and Seeing Data has asked that you share additional ones with them via blog comments or their Twitter social media account @SeeingData.

Low Cost Mapping Tools for Community-Based Organizations!

Community Health Maps Blog is an initiative designed to share information about free and low cost and easy-to-use applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping tools. The goal is to help community-based and other types of small organizations collect and visualize information about their communities with an eye towards using these techniques to support planning and decision-making about community health. The tools discussed on the Community Health Maps Blog can support the collection and visualization of health statistics, demographic information, community resources, and events, thereby facilitating a better understanding of community conditions.

The interactive nature of blogging helps Community Health Maps share information about hardware platforms and software applications available to communities as they consider how, or if, they might use GIS. NLM encourages the submission of blog postings by those who use such resources to carry out projects within their communities, as well as those who have identified additional applications that may be of interest for this purpose.