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Archive for the ‘General’ Category

Classroom Activities and Lesson Plans for NLM Native Voices Exhibition

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Division of Specialized Information Services K-12 Workgroup has released classroom activities and lesson plans to supplement the Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness web site. For grades 6-12, these classroom activities and lesson plans familiarize students to the health and medicine of Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. The activities and lesson plans use Native Voices exhibition web site content material and other NLM online educational/science resources.

The activities and lesson plans are composed of four units. Each unit introduces a different way of exploring and learning about the Native Voices exhibition in about 1.5 to 3 hours. These units are: 1) A scavenger hunt, 2) An environmental health science lesson, 3) A social science lesson, and 4) A biology lesson. While the activities and lesson plans can be used in science classrooms, clubs, and programs, they can be used also to reinforce the history and societal developments of Native peoples in social science and history classrooms.

The Native Voices Web site allows people to experience an exhibition currently on display at NLM in Bethesda, Maryland. Both versions explore the connection between wellness, illness, and cultural life through a combination of interviews with Native people and interactive media. For additional information, contact Alla Keselman, PhD, K-12 Team Leader, National Library of Medicine.

Mark E. de Jong Appointed Head of NLM’s Collection Access Section

Mark E. de Jong has been selected to fill the position of Head, Collection Access Section, in the Public Services Division, Library Operations, NLM, effective February 23, 2014. Mark comes to NLM from the position of Access Services Manager, University of Maryland University College (UMUC), where he directs a staff of nine in providing document delivery and interlibrary loan services to UMUC’s students and faculty in the U.S., Europe, and Asia. Mark has been with UMUC since 2005 and his experiences include overseeing the planning, development, and implementation of the ILLiad software for interlibrary loan management, as well as the implementation of SharePoint knowledge management platform to improve library communications, collaboration, and document management. He holds the rank of associate professor (adjunct) at UMUC, where he has taught both undergraduate and graduate courses in research and information literacy. Mark has published extensively in the library field; his newest work is a chapter on service design thinking in libraries for Woodsworth & Penniman, Advances in Librarianship, (Emerald Press, forthcoming).

Mark’s previous professional experiences include access and reference positions at Thurgood Marshall Law Library, University of Maryland at Baltimore; Frostburg State University; and the University of Buffalo. Mark holds a MA in history (SUNY College at Brockport) and MLS (University at Buffalo). He holds a doctorate in management (ADB) from UMUC, where his dissertation topic is “Attributes of Effective Leadership.”

Evaluation Terminology: Free Resources

Kylie Hutchinson is a Credentialied Evaluator and consultant to non-profit organizations, specializing in the areas of program planning and evaluation. She regularly presents webinars for Community Solutions Planning & Evaluation about topics such as the vast and often jargony world of evaluation terminology. As part of Hutchison’s research, she has consulted online evaluation glossaries, such as the OECD Glossary of Key Terms in Evaluation and Results Based Management and the US Environmental Protection Agency  Program Evaluation Glossary, and counted thirty six different definitions of evaluation methods within them. What accounts for so much variation? Common reasons include the perspectives and language used by different sectors and funders such as education, government, and non-profit organizations.

A helpful tip when working with organizations on evaluation projects is to ask to see copies of documents such as annual reports, mission and vision statements, strategic planning, and promotional materials, to learn more about the language they use to communicate about themselves. This will assist you in knowing if modifications in assessment terminology language are needed, and can help guide discussions on clarifying the organization’s purpose of the evaluation.

Hutchinson identified several common themes within the plethora of evaluation methods and created color-coded clusters of them within her Evaluation Terminology Map, which uses the bubbl.us online mind mapping program. She also created a freely available Evaluation Glossary app for use on both iPhone and Android mobile devices and has a web-based version under development. For additional resources to better understand health information outreach evaluation, be sure to visit the NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) Tools and Resources for Evaluation LibGuide.

New Project Announced for Collecting Health Data for Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Populations!

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have launched the first-ever, large-scale national health survey to collect detailed health information for Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (NHPI) households; the Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander National Health Interview Survey. The information will be collected through the National Health Interview Survey, which is conducted by CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics, and is the nation’s largest in-person, household health survey. Never before has there been a study of this scale to assess the health needs of NHPIs, and this type of survey has long been called for by the NHPI community. This important effort will help improve understanding of the health concerns faced by this community and to identify areas of opportunity for the federal government to better address these concerns.

The Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders National Health Interview Survey will include a sample of approximately 4,000 households. Data collection for the survey begins in February 2014 and findings will be available in the summer of 2015. The data will help public health researchers to produce reports on a wide range of important health indicators for the Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander population. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders comprise just 0.4% of the total U.S. population, which makes it difficult to include them in sufficient numbers in most national population-based health surveys. The lack of reliable health data for this population has made it difficult to assess their health status and health care utilization. However, the available data for this population indicates that they experience significant health disparities when compared to other groups, such as lower utilization of health care services and higher rates of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity.

NLM Releases Digitized Collection of Its Publications and Productions

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has announced a new addition to its Digital Collections: over 400 NLM publications and productions dating from the 1860s to the 1990s. This new digital collection encompasses all printed monographic publications produced by NLM and its earlier incarnation as the Library of the Surgeon General’s Office. The collection also includes nearly three dozen audiovisual productions produced by the NLM during the past six decades, as well as publications of the NLM’s institutional and historical “sister,” the Army Medical Museum, which is today the National Museum of Health and Medicine. In the early 1920s, the Library of the Surgeon General’s Office was renamed the Army Medical Library, and it was housed with the Army Medical Museum until the 1950s when the institutions were physically separated as they are today.  They continue to share a common goal of collecting, preserving, and providing knowledge about the past, present, and future of biomedicine and health care.

Among the variety of materials in this collection; including books, catalogs, indexes, prospectuses, policy statements, planning documents, ephemera, and technical reports; are dozens of historical gems, including:

  • the first printed catalogs of the Army Medical Museum and the Library of the Surgeon General’s Office in 1863 and 1864, both published during the Civil War;
  • a 1963 pamphlet introducing MEDLARS, the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, which represented the birth of electronic storage and retrieval of indexed medical literature;
  • all 61 volumes of the Index-Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon-General’s Office, originally published from 1880 to 1961, representing one of the monuments of the Library’s longstanding, systematic indexing of the medical literature. The release of these digitized volumes follows on the NLM earlier this year releasing the Extensible Markup Language (XML) data from the IndexCat database, to help open this key resource in the history of medicine and science to new uses and users;
  • Dream Anatomy, the illustrated 2006 catalogue based on the National Library of Medicine’s milestone Dream Anatomy exhibition;
  • a 1994 video entitled, “NLM and the Internet,” which gives a very early look at the Internet promoting the use of Gopher files servers and Mosaic, one of the earliest web browsers first created in 1992.

Institute for Research Design in Librarianship: June 16-26 in Los Angeles

The Institute for Research Design in Librarianship is a great opportunity for an academic librarian who is interested in conducting research. Research and evaluation are not necessarily identical, although they do employ many of the same methods and are closely related. This Institute is open to academic librarians from all over the country. If your proposal is accepted, your attendance at the Institute will be paid for, as will your travel, lodging, and food expenses. Proposals are due by February 1, 2014. Details are available at the Institute’s Prepare Your Proposal web site. Applicants accepted to the program will be notified by March 1, 2014. The Institute is particularly interested in applicants who have identified a real-world research question and/or opportunity.

The William H. Hannon Library has received a three-year grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to offer a nine-day continuing education opportunity for academic and research librarians. Each year 21 librarians will receive instruction in research design and a full year of support to complete a research project at their home institutions. The summer Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) is supplemented with pre-institute learning activities and a personal learning network that provides ongoing mentoring. The institutes will be held on the campus of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.

NLM Enhances Online Resource “In His Own Words: Martin Cummings and the NLM”

The National Library of Medicine Library has announced the enhancement of In His Own Words: Martin Cummings and the NLM, a digital edition of selected speeches and articles by the man who served as its director from 1964 to 1983. During his tenure, Dr. Cummings guided NLM into the computer age and significantly broadened its mission. Originally launched in February 2012, In His Own Words now includes Dr. Cummings’ annual Congressional appropriations testimonies, along with commentary provided by Dr. Cummings through interviews with Dr. Cheryl Dee of San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science and Florida State University School of Library and Information Services. These enhancements document Dr. Cummings’s opinion that the testimonies and commentaries together offer the most valuable window into NLM’s program development from the 1960s to the 1980s. Reflecting on his testimonies, and the subsequent question and answer sessions defending them, Dr. Cummings’s commentary provides contextual insight on significant turning points in the Library’s history and the political personalities that influenced them.

Martin Marc Cummings, MD (1920–2011), was a medical educator, physician, scientific administrator and medical librarian. Highly respected in all of these disciplines, he made significant contributions to medical informatics and librarianship. As a whole, In His Own Words represents the NLM’s ongoing commitment to collecting materials related to its institutional history and programmatic impact—as part of the NLM Archives—as well as to digitizing these collections and making them widely available for the benefit of researchers, educators, and students.

ACRL Announces New Publication in the Active Guides Series!

ACRL has announced the publication of Designing Training, by Melanie Hawks, the fifth entry in the ACRL Active Guides series. It is available for purchase in print through the ALA Online Store and Amazon.com; and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252. Focusing on the needs of the adult learner, Designing Training will help librarians and library staff plan training sessions for takeaway value, learner engagement, and learning transfer. Hawks provides examples and exercises that demonstrate how to design highly effective learning events from the ground up. The practical activities provided throughout this title will lead the reader through the process of developing well-designed training that sets up both the trainer and the learners to succeed. Designing Training is a practical guide that will serve as an essential go-to resource for those responsible for training as either an on-going job assignment or an occasional project.

The ACRL Active Guides series address professional and workplace issues. Additional titles in the series include Life-Work Balance, Influencing without Authority, Conversations that Work: Conducting Performance Assessments, and Pay it Forward: Mentoring New Information Professionals.

New Edition of Planning and Evaluating Health Information Outreach Projects Booklet Series Available Online!

The second edition (2013) of the popular Planning and Evaluating Health Information Outreach Projects booklet series presents step-by-step planning and evaluation methods. Along with providing information about evaluation, each booklet includes a case study and worksheets to assist with outreach planning. The booklets are designed to supplement Measuring the Difference: Guide to Planning and Evaluating Health Information Outreach, and to support evaluation workshops. The three updated booklets are now available online in HTML (screen reader optimized) and PDF formats:

Getting Started with Community-Based Outreach (Booklet 1)
What’s new? More emphasis and background on the value of health information outreach, including its relationship to the Healthy People 2020 Health Communication and Health Information Technology topic area.

Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Projects (Booklet 2)
What’s new? Focus on uses of the logic model planning tool beyond project planning, such as providing approaches to writing proposals and reports.

Collecting and Analyzing Evaluation Data (Booklet 3)
What’s new? Step-by-step guide to collecting, analyzing, and assessing the validity (or trustworthiness) of quantitative and qualitative data, using questionnaires and interviews as examples.

Copies of the booklets are available from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Outreach Evaluation Resource Center. To receive free copies send an email request to: nnlm@uw.edu.

Sara Tybaert Appointed as New Head of NLM’s MEDLARS Management Section!

Sara Tybaert begins her new position as Head of MEDLARS Management Section (MMS) in NLM’s Bibliographic Services Division (BSD) on October 6, 2013. Sara has been with MMS since 1990, filling many roles. Since 2011, Sara has been the Head of the Bibliographic Data Management Unit within MMS. In this position she has overseen the daily MEDLINE data verification process for the nightly exports of MEDLINE data to PubMed and to MEDLINE licensees. Her work includes oversight of the various systems used in the data quality control work performed within MMS. She also supports the ongoing development and testing of data input and maintenance systems for MEDLINE. And perhaps most importantly, Sara has been the project manager for the annual Year End Processing (YEP) efforts within BSD.

Sara has provided support and oversight for several key projects within MMS during her tenure at NLM. She serves as the MMS representative to the Shared Serials Group. Sara also currently serves as the MMS representative to the NLM COGNOS Team Leads group, and participates on the MEDLINE Processing Working Group and NLM DTD Group. She has participated on the MMS PubMed team with NCBI, including system testing and support for MEDLINE/PubMed customer service. In addition, she has often represented NLM at the NLM Exhibit Booth at the MLA annual meeting. Over the years, one of Sara’s greatest accomplishments was serving as the COR/COTR for the NLM Bioethics Contract with the Kennedy Institute of Ethics. Under her guidance, NLM was eventually able to reduce and eventually discontinue this contract, providing significant savings to NLM and Library Operations.