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Archive for the ‘Funding’ Category

Congratulations to the 2015 AAHSL Leadership Scholarship awardees!

The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) Leadership Scholarships support career development opportunities for persons interested in leadership roles at all levels in academic health sciences libraries. Scholarship awards, in amounts up to $2500, may be used for participation in established educational programs or for individually designed learning opportunities. Applications are accepted and awards are made annually. Following are the four recipients of scholarships awarded in June 2015, two of whom are current NN/LM PSR Network members and one who is a former PSR Network member:

  • Frances Chu, University of Washington Health Sciences Library, to attend the 2015 Women’s Negotiation Academy.
  • Jonathan Koffel, University of Minnesota Bio-Medical Library, to attend the 2015 Harvard Leadership Institute for Academic Librarians.
  • Anneliese Taylor, University of California San Francisco Library and Center for Knowledge Management, to attend the 2015 Harvard Leadership Institute for Academic Librarians.
  • Annie Thompson, University of Southern California Wilson Dental Library and Learning Center, to attend the 2015 Harvard Leadership Institute for Academic Librarians.

Kudos to all the recipients, who were selected as part of a competitive process from the largest number of applicants in a decade!

2015 HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Projects Solicitation Released!

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has announced the solicitation of proposals for the 2015 HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Projects, from organizations and libraries to design and conduct projects that will improve access to HIV/AIDS related health information for patients, the affected community, and their caregivers. Awards are offered for up to $50,000. Quotations are due to NLM by July 20, 2015!

The solicitation for the 2015 HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Projects is posted on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site. The Federal Business Opportunities Web site will also list all notices, updates, and modifications to the Solicitation.

Projects must involve one or more of the following information access categories: information retrieval; skills development, resource development; and/or equipment acquisition. Emphasis will be placed upon the following types of organizations or arrangements for developing these programs: community-based organizations (CBOs) or patient advocacy groups currently providing HIV/AIDS-related services to the affected community; public libraries serving communities in the provision of HIV/AIDS-related information and resources; health departments or other local, municipal, or state agencies working to improve public health; faith-based organizations currently providing HIV/AIDS-related services; and/or multi-type consortia of the above-listed organizations that may be in existence or formed specifically for this project.

The NLM primary point of contact for the solicitation is Greg Benedict, Contract Specialist, and the secondary point of contact is Shari Shor, Contracting Officer.

San Francisco General Hospital Library Receives NLM Grant to Reduce Health Disparities!

Congratulations to Stephen Kiyoi, Library Director at San Francisco General Hospital, who is a Principal Investigator on a newly awarded three-year, $300,000 NLM Information Resource Grant to Reduce Health Disparities (G08) from the National Library of Medicine. The project, Patient Engagement with Personal Health Records, will support the research and development of better ways to engage safety net patients with personal health records.

Partnering on the grant are Courtney Lyles, PhD, and Urmimala Sarkar, MD, MPH, from the UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations (CVP). The CVP is an internationally recognized leader in health communication and health policy to reduce health disparities, with special expertise in the social determinants of health. The team will also partner with Yemila Alvarez, Community Outreach Manager at the San Francisco Public Library (SFPL). SFPL will help disseminate and scale project interventions across its 27 branch locations.

Funding Announcement: NLM Administrative Supplements for Informationist Services in NIH-funded Research Projects!

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other participating NIH Institutes and Centers solicit applications for administrative supplements to eligible NIH awardees with active R01 grants and, depending on each participating Institute or Center’s preferences, with active P01, P20, P30, P50, R21, R34, U01, U19, U24, UM1 and U54 grants. The purposes of this administrative supplement program are (1) to enhance collaborative, multi-disciplinary basic and clinical research by integrating an information specialist into the research team in order to improve the capture, storage, organization, management, integration, presentation and dissemination of biomedical research data; and (2) to assess and document the value and impact of the informationist’s participation.

The Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages eligible NIH awardees as described above, who are interested in integrating an informationist into their research teams for the above-stated purposes to begin to consider applying for this new FOA. Interested eligible awardees are encouraged to begin seeking collaborative arrangements with informationists at their institutions or another institution as appropriate. Informationists are information specialists, usually health sciences librarians, who have graduate training and practical experience that provides them with disciplinary background in biomedical, behavioral or biological sciences and in library and information sciences/informatics. Their cross training provides informationists with a unique perspective on the acquisition, synthesis, management and use of information in research. Informationists work as team members with research scientists and health professionals, and are sometimes called in-context or ‘embedded’ information specialists.

Applications must be submitted electronically by July 17, 2015. Approximately five administrative supplement awards are anticipated in FY 2015. Total direct costs requested for the supplement may not exceed $25,000 per year. The project period is limited to two years. The earliest funding start date is September, 2015. Previously, eleven awards were made in 2014, and eight awards were made in 2012. For questions, contact Dr. Alan VanBiervliet at NLM.

NLM Project to Improve Malaria Diagnosis Wins HHS Funding

Researchers at the National Library of Medicine are collaborating on a software tool to speed up the diagnosis of malaria. They’ve developed an automated system for detecting and counting parasites in blood films. The goal is to develop a version for smartphones so it can be used in the field. The project, Watch it, Parasite!, is an idea so promising, the US Department of Health and Human Services will provide support from the HHS Innovation Ventures Fund Program to take this early-stage idea to the next level.

The current standard method for malaria diagnosis in the field is light microscopy of blood films. About 170 million blood films are examined every year for malaria, which involves manual counting of parasites. To improve malaria diagnostics, the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, an R&D division of the National Library of Medicine, in collaboration with NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and Mahidol-Oxford University, is developing a fully-automated system for parasite detection and counting in blood films. While existing drugs make malaria a curable disease, inadequate diagnostics and emerging drug resistance are major barriers to successful mortality reduction. The development of a fast and reliable diagnostic test is therefore one of the most promising ways of fighting malaria, together with better treatment, development of new malaria vaccines, and mosquito control.

Read more about this project by visiting NLM in Focus.

New NIH BD2K Funding Opportunity!

A new Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) funding opportunity is available, Supplements to Support Interoperability of NIH Funded Biomedical Data Repositories, with an April 20 application due date. NIH is accepting administrative supplement requests to support projects that will establish or improve interoperability among NIH funded biomedical data repositories. Improved interoperability is expected to lead to increased efficiency of repositories’ operations and cost reductions, which are significant factors of the NIH’s long-term sustainability plans for the biomedical data repositories. Each supplement request should be associated to a collaborative project consisting of a biomedical data repository supported by an active NIH-funded parent grant, and one or more collaborating sites that together implement the interoperability goals of this FOA. The collaborating sites may be other biomedical data repositories, or may provide computational tools and data standards, or perform other activities that facilitate interoperability among data repositories. Supplement requests will only be accepted from active NIH-funded parent grants that primarily support biomedical data repositories with an overall annual budget above $500,000 in direct costs.

Valentina di Francesca (NHGRI) will be organizing an administrative review panel for these supplements as a group. Administrative review is expected to occur in May 2015, and completed by August 24, 2015. Awards are expected to be made in August/September 2015.

Mapping an Outreach Project: Online Training Opportunity!

Cindy Olney, PhD, Acting Assistant Director of the NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC), is presenting the online training opportunity Mapping an Outreach Project, a series of four one-hour online sessions with the potential for up to 8 CEUs, beginning February 24. This webinar series is designed for anyone who wants to garner support, financial or otherwise, for a new project or service, and will be especially useful for anyone planning to submit an outreach award proposal. You will learn how assessment and evaluation are effective tools for project planning and proposal writing. Community assessment allows you to gather compelling information about the need and viability of your project. It also helps you build relationships with potential partners. Adding evaluation methods to your program plan helps you “begin with the end in mind,” making desired results the centerpiece of your project proposal. After completing this series, participants will be able to do the following:

  • How people adopt new ideas. Know the factors that influence people to adopt new ideas and technology so you can choose the best strategies for your project. (Part 1)
  • Meeting the Community through Community Assessment. Gather community information that is most effective for planning your project. (Part 2)
  • Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Programs. Use a project-planning tool that allows you to logically link resources and activities to desired results. (Part 3)
  • Adding Evaluation to Your Plan and Next Steps: Proposal Writing. Incorporate evaluation into your project and understand how your plan can be expanded into a full proposal. (Part 4)

The webinars will be held February 24, February 26, March 3, and March 5, all from 10-11 a.m. PST. They will be recorded for those unable to attend the live sessions. One MLA CEU will be awarded per live or recorded webinar attended (1-4 CEUs). Up to four extra CEUs can be earned for a four-part homework assignment. All webinars must be viewed and homework completed and sent to the instructor by Thursday, March 12. Registration is available for any or all of the sessions.

Grant Announcement for the National Resource Center for HIV/AIDS Prevention Among Adolescents

The HHS Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) has issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) with the purpose of funding an organization that will support the maintenance, operation, and re-launch of a national HIV/AIDS resource center. The Resource Center will promote practical strategies to assist in the implementation of evidence-based and evidence-informed interventions and best practices targeted to adolescent youth, in particular adolescents at high risk and African American and Hispanic/Latino adolescents. Funding for this project comes from the HHS Secretary’s Minority AIDS Initiative (MAI). OAH anticipates funding one grantee with an annual budget of up to $350,000 per year for a three-year project period. Applications are due by Friday, April 10, 2015.

Public Access Compliance Monitor

The Public Access Compliance Monitor (PACM or “compliance monitor”) is a service from the National Library of Medicine that helps users at NIH-funded institutions locate and track the compliance of funded papers with the NIH Public Access Policy at an institutional level. Whether you are looking for a quick snapshot of your institution’s compliance rate or want to take an active role in helping your investigators comply with the policy, PACM can help you get the information you need.

To gain access to the compliance monitor, users must first be assigned a compliance reports role (“PACR”) role by an administrator at their institution who is authorized to assign roles in the NIH eRA Commons grants administration system. Users with a PACR role will then have access to the compliance reports for their institution.

PACM provides users with a list of all PubMed citations associated with an institution’s NIH funding and classifies the articles according to compliance status (i.e., Compliant, Non-Compliant, In Process). The compliance monitor also provides detailed information about each article including:

  • a full citation including the PMID (PubMed ID) and link to the PubMed record
  • associated grants and principal investigators
  • NIHMSID (NIH Manuscript Submission Reference Number), where available
  • PMCID (PubMed Central ID), where available
  • key names and dates in the NIHMS, where available
  • article compliance status
  • method A status
  • journal publisher

Compliance reports can be downloaded from these lists and the data filtered based on an institution’s needs.

For more information on the PACR role, the compliance monitor, and the available reports, see the User Guide. Additonally, an overview video of PACM from The NIH Public Access Policy for Librarians Webinar and a four-minute Look at the NIH Public Access Policy Compliance Monitor are available.

NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Funding Announcements!

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) launched two more funding opportunities to support NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Initiative Research Education for developing educational resources for information professionals.

  1. RFA-LM-15-001:

    This funding announcement seeks applications for the development of a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) that covers a comprehensive set of topics related to the management of biomedical Big Data. The primary audience for this course is librarians and information specialists, who could use these materials as the basis of training and services to graduate students, faculty, research staff and administrators at their organizations. However, the resource should also be usable by any of these audiences for self-instruction. The application due date is March 17, 2015.

  2. RFA-LM-15-002:

    This funding announcement seeks applications for the development of curriculum modules that can be used by librarians and other information specialists to prepare researchers, graduate students and research staff to be full participants in the global community that maintains and accesses digitally-stored biomedical Big Data. The application due date is March 17, 2015.