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Archive for the ‘Education & Training’ Category

NTC Webinar: Teaching Topics on February 19

Join members of the National Library of Medicine Training Center for three quick online presentations related to teaching topics. Jessi Van Der Volgen will discuss tips and tools for creating video tutorials. Cheryl Rowan will talk about including audience culture and diversity in your training sessions and Rebecca Brown will demonstrate how to integrate Zaption into your online training to add interactive opportunities to videos. Register now for this one-hour session on Friday, February 19, at 10:00 AM PST!

MeSH Webinar: “2016 MeSH Highlights” on January 20

On January 20, join NLM staff for a highlights tour of the 2016 Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). A 30-minute presentation will feature a MeSH tree clean-up project; a new Clinical Study publication type; changes to the trees for diet, food and nutrition; restructuring in pharmacology and toxicology; and new terms in psychology and health care. Following the presentation, Indexing and MeSH experts will be available to answer your questions.

Webinar: 2016 MeSH Highlights
Date and time: Wednesday, January 20, 2016, at 9:00 am PST
View a recording of the presentation.

For more information about 2016 MeSH, see What’s New for 2016 MeSH and the Introduction to MeSH – 2016.

Webinar Series: Mapping an Outreach Project: Start with Information; End with a Plan

If you want to develop a project that requires stakeholder support, you need more than a solid plan. You need to build the case for both the need and potential success of your program. In February, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) will offer a four-session webinar series on how to use program evaluation tools and methods to develop a program plan that you can promote to stakeholders, such as funding or partnering organizations. Community assessment will allow you to gather compelling information about the need and viability of your project, as well as help you build relationships with potential partners. You will learn about planning tools that help you connect program activities to desired outcomes and add a strong evaluation component to your project proposal. The information in this workshop will help you organize both your project ideas and supporting data in preparation for proposal writing.

  • (Webinar 1) How people adopt new ideas. Know the factors that influence people to adopt new ideas and technology so you can choose the best strategies for your project.
  • (Webinar 2) Meeting the Community through Community Assessment. Gather community information that is most effective for planning your project.
  • (Webinar 3) Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Programs. Use a project-planning tool that allows you to logically link resources and activities to desired results.
  • (Webinar 4) Adding Evaluation to Your Plan and Next Steps: Proposal Writing. Incorporate evaluation into your project and understand how your plan can be expanded into a full proposal.

Dates and Times: This webinar series will be offered at two different times during the month of February. (Sessions will be recorded for those who with schedule conflicts.)

  • Session 1: Classes will meet Monday 2/1; Wednesday 2/3; Monday 2/8; and Wednesday 2/10. All sessions will be held from 9am-10am PST.
  • Session 2: Classes will meet Tuesday 2/16; Thursday 2/18; Tuesday 2/23; and Thursday 2/25. All sessions will be held from 1pm-2pm PST.

Registration is required. To sign up, go to the Mapping an Outreach Project webpage to select your preferred session and click on “Register” to fill out the registration form. Participants are eligible to receive 1, 2, 3, 4, or 8 hours of continuing education (CE) credit from the Medical Library Association. One hour of CE will be earned for each live or recorded webinar attended (up to 4 CEs), and an extra four CEs can be earned for a four-part homework assignment. All webinars must be viewed and homework completed and sent to the instructor by the deadline.

104 libraries selected to host traveling exhibition on Native concepts of health and illness

The American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office, on behalf of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), has announced the 104 libraries that will host Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness, a traveling exhibition to U.S. libraries. Native Voices explores the interconnectedness of wellness, illness and cultural life for Native Americans, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians. Stories drawn from both the past and present examine how health for Native People is tied to community, the land and spirit. Through interviews, Native People describe the impact of epidemics, federal legislation, the loss of land and the inhibition of culture on the health of Native individuals and communities today.

The exhibition will tour the United States from February 2016 through June 2020. Selected sites from Pacific Southwest Region include:

Arizona

  • A. T. Still University of the Health Sciences, Mesa
  • Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Yuma County Library District, Yuma

California

  • Alpine Branch, San Diego County Library, Alpine
  • Humboldt State University, Arcata
  • California State University, Bakersfield
  • California State University Channel Islands, Camarillo
  • California State University, Fresno
  • University of Redlands, Redlands
  • Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation, Smith River
  • Springfield College, Tustin
  • City of Watsonville, Watsonville

Hawaii

  • University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo

Nevada

  • University of Nevada, Reno

Upcoming NCBI Webinars: Eukaryotic Genome Data Curation and NCBI Graphical Viewers

Join NCBI staff for the upcoming webinars on RefSeq and NCBI Graphical Viewers (including Sequence Viewer and Variation Viewer):

Eukaryotic Genome Data Curation at NCBI
Tuesday, January 5, 2016, 10:00-11:00 am PST
What do a fish, a plant, and a protozoan have in common? These are all example organisms for which NCBI Reference Sequence (RefSeq) staff manually examine and improve the scientific data in NCBI Assembly, Gene, Genome, and RefSeq (among other) databases. The RefSeq project spans viruses to human and in this webinar, three RefSeq biocurators will focus on aspects of data curation for eukaryotic organisms. We will discuss several aspects of manual curation including sequence analysis, functional annotation, data validation and community collaboration. We will also highlight how these curation efforts improve the programmatic approaches used by RefSeq genome annotation pipelines, which allow NCBI to handle the ever-increasing amount of data generated by researchers.

NCBI Minute: New track options for getting the most out of NCBI Graphical Viewers
Thursday, January 7, 2016, 9:00-9:15 am PST
New track options in the NCBI graphical viewers and genome browsers provide powerful features including seven different NCBI Recommended Track Sets, the ability to create, save and share custom track sets as a collection in My NCBI. You will learn how to use these new features as well see how to search and quickly find relevant tracks and to upload your own custom data. This webinar will help you get the most out of the NCBI Graphical Sequence Viewer, Variation Viewer and other NCBI graphical browsers.

Visit the NCBI Webinars and Courses webpage to view archived webinars and materials, and to learn about future webinars. Archived webinars can also be accessed on the NCBI YouTube channel.

Upcoming NCBI Webinars: Advanced Search in dbGaP and 1000 Genomes Project Data

Join NCBI staff for the upcoming webinars on dbGaP and the 1000 Genomes Project Data.

NCBI Minute: New Advanced Search in dbGaP Provides Easy Access to Relevant Data
Wednesday, December 16, 2015, 9:00-9:15 am PST
The new advanced search interface to dbGaP makes finding relevant data much easier. In this webinar you will learn how to access the new faceted search and to quickly find human subject data by study, variables, datasets, documents, and genotypes.

Accessing the 1000 Genomes Project Data at the NCBI
Thursday, December 17, 2015, 10:00-11:00 am PST
The 1000 Genomes Project data now include small-scale and structural variant calls from 2,504 individuals representing 26 human populations. In this webinar you will see how to access 1000 Genomes data through the SRA, dbVar, SNP and BioProject resources, as well as through tracks on annotated human sequences in the Graphical sequence viewer and the Variation Viewer. Most important you will learn how to display, search, and download individual and genotype level data through the dedicated 1000 Genomes Browser that allows searching by chromosomal position, gene names and other genome markers.

Visit the NCBI Webinars and Courses webpage to view archived webinars and materials, and to learn about future webinars. Archived webinars can also be accessed on the NCBI YouTube channel.

AAHSL Data Scholarships

The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) Future Leadership Committee has announced the one-time offering of several scholarships to support individuals from AAHSL member libraries interested in learning more about any aspect of the data life cycle. A total of $5000 is available for the committee to award. Scholarship awards, in amounts up to $2500, may be used for participation in established educational programs, or for individually designed learning opportunities. Candidates should be employed in a professional position in an AAHSL member library (full or associate member) and have an MLS or comparable graduate degree. The maximum award for any single scholarship will not exceed $2500. Funds must be used within 12 months of the award date.

Applicants should express in a Word document of 300 words or fewer how they would use data scholarship funding to enhance their understanding of data, and how they would apply that knowledge in their work. Additionally, an itemized cost breakdown of anticipated expenses (e.g. travel, accommodations, registration, or other expenses) should be included. The Future Leadership Committee will consider a wide variety of learning opportunities, so applicants have significant latitude in their proposals. The deadline for applications is February 1, 2016. Successful applicants will be notified March 1, 2016. Please submit applications to office@aahsl.org with the subject heading AAHSL Data Scholarship. Persons awarded data scholarships are required to submit a report upon completion of the learning activity.

December Webinar Opportunities Hosted by NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region

The NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region has announced two webinar opportunities that are open to anyone wishing to attend:

Tuesday, December 8: Hospital Libraries: Challenges and Opportunities – This session will include discussion of the current state of hospital libraries and consider their future in light of the Affordable Care Act, Meaningful Use, and budget cuts. It will also consider the role the librarian plays and their effect on these changes, as well as ways the library’s resources (including the librarian) can help offset the expenses hospitals are facing. Speaker: Heather N. Holmes, MLIS, AHIP, Clinical Informationist, Summa Health System, Akron, OH.
When: December 8, 2015, 9:00-10:00am PST
Where: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/boost2/
No Registration Required
Eligible for 1 MLA CEU

Thursday, December 17: Saving time with PubMed Subject-specific Queries – Want to boost your PubMed prowess? Looking for preformulated searches on drugs, health information technology, public health and other topics? Spend an hour with NN/LM MAR Outreach Coordinator, Kate Flewelling, to save hours on your searches!
When: December 17, 2015, 9:00-10:00am PST
Where: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/nlmfocus/
No Registration Required
Eligible for 1 MLA CE

NIH Pathways to Prevention Workshop: Total Worker Health® – What’s Work Got to Do With It?

Unlike traditional workplace systems, which often address worker safety, health, and well-being separately, Total Worker Health® (TWH) builds upon the foundation of protecting workers by supporting a universal understanding of the various factors that influence safety, health, and well-being.

To better understand the benefits of an integrated approach to worker health, NIOSH, along with the NIH Office of Disease Prevention (ODP) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), is sponsoring the NIH Pathways to Prevention Workshop: Total Worker Health® – What’s Work Got to Do With It? The workshop will seek to evaluate the current state of knowledge on integrated approaches to worker safety, health, and well-being, and plot the direction for future research.

There is no fee to attend the workshop. The workshop will take place on December 9 and 10 in the Masur Auditorium on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) campus in Bethesda, Maryland. If you are unable to attend in person, the workshop will be broadcast on the NIH videocast page. Registration, although not required, is encouraged for in-person and videocast attendees. Join the conversation on Twitter with #NIHP2P.

Special NHGRI Seminar Series Begins December 3: “A Quarter Century after the Human Genome Project’s Launch: Lessons beyond the Base Pairs”

Illustrative collage of archived documents and photosOctober 1, 2015 marked the 25th anniversary of the launch of the Human Genome Project. To commemorate this anniversary in a fashion that showcases the rich history of the Human Genome Project and the field of genomics over the last quarter-century, the NHGRI History of Genomics Program is hosting a seminar series entitled “A Quarter Century after the Human Genome Project’s Launch: Lessons Beyond the Base Pairs.” The program will feature Human Genome Project participants, who will be sharing their perspectives about the Project and how it affected their careers.

The series kicks off on December 3 with a panel discussion that will include the key NHGRI leadership during the Human Genome Project including Francis Collins (NIH Director and Former NHGRI Director) as well as Elke Jordan and Mark Guyer (Former NHGRI Deputy Directors). Other speakers will follow in early 2016 including Maynard Olson, Ewan Birney, Bob Cook-Deegan, Marco Marra, and David Bentley. The lectures take place on Thursday afternoons from 2 to 3 p.m. ET in Lipsett Amphitheater in Building 10 on the main NIH campus; they will also be videorecorded and made available on the NHGRI GenomeTV channel of YouTube. All seminars are free and open to the public.

Additionally, NHGRI has published a video interview with NHGRI Director Dr. Eric Green, “The Impact of the Human Genome Project 25 years from its Launch.” Dr. Green reflects on the lasting legacy of the Human Genome Project (HGP) 25 years after its start. Among HGP’s far-reaching impacts: team science, data sharing and analysis and technology development.