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Archive for the ‘Education & Training’ Category

Upcoming NCBI Discovery Workshops at UC Davis and UC Berkeley!

NCBI Discovery Workshops, consisting of four 2.5-hour hands-on training sessions emphasizing NCBI resources such as BLAST and Nucleotide, will be presented by NCBI staff at the University of California, Davis, on September 15-16, and at the University of California, Berkeley, on September 17-18:

  • Session 1: Navigating NCBI Molecular Data Through the Integrated Entrez System. 9 am – 11:30 am, 9/15 (UC Davis) & 9/17 (UC Berkeley)
  • Session 2: NCBI Genomes, Assemblies and Annotation Products: Microbes to Human. 1 pm – 3:30 pm, 9/15 (UC Davis) & 9/17 (UC Berkeley)
  • Session 3: Advanced NCBI BLAST. 9 am – 11:30 am, 9/16 (UC Davis) & 9/18 (UC Berkeley)
  • Session 4: Gene Expression Resources at NCBI. 1 pm – 3:30 pm, 9/16 (UC Davis) & 9/18 (UC Berkeley)

​For more information or to register:

For Questions:

Free Online Course–Shaping Outcomes: Making a Difference in Libraries and Museums

Shaping Outcomes: Making a Difference in Libraries and Museums is available as a free online course that learners can start anytime and work on at their own self-navigated pace. While there are library and museum-specific examples provided in the course, the concepts of learning more about target audience needs, how to clarify desired results, developing logic models, and evaluating outcomes are applicable for most any organization’s outreach projects. Modules of the class are broken into five sections; Overview, Plan, Build, Evaluate, and Report, with a helpful Glossary to learn outcomes-based planning and evaluation (OBPE) terminology, and a Logic Model template. Shaping Outcomes was developed by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and Indiana University/Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) and previously was available as an instructor-led class.

More information specific to developing logic models in health information outreach programs is available from NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) Booklet Two: Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Projects. Additional information is available on the OERC Evaluation Guides page.

National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) Offers Free Online TOXNET Class This Fall!

The National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) is offering an online, asynchronous Moodle class called Discovering TOXNET from October 20 – November 14, 2014. Register now to discover TOXNET and other NLM environmental health databases through videos, guided tutorials, and discovery exercises! The class is taught online in thirteen independent modules. Participants work on their own time over a period of four weeks to complete the modules of interest. There is one required module; the remaining are optional. This class is offered for variable MLA Continuing Education credit. Each module will be offered for 0.5 to 2.0 credit hours, for a total of up to 12 hours. Credit will not be awarded for partial completion of a module. Total credit awarded will be based on completed modules with a minimum of 1.0 credit hours.

TOXNET is a web-based system of databases covering hazardous chemicals, environmental health, toxic releases, chemical nomenclature, poisoning, risk assessment and regulations, and occupational safety and health. The independent modules cover TOXLINE, ChemIDplus, TRI, TOXMAP, Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), IRIS, Haz-Map, LactMed, WISER, CHEMM, REMM, LiverTox, and more. 

The modules are:

  1. Introduction to TOXNET: 0.5 hour (Required)
  2. TOXLINE: 1.0 hour
  3. ChemIDplus: 2.0 hours
  4. Integrated Risk Information System & Risk Assessment: 1.0 hour
  5. Hazardous Substances Databank: 1.5 hours
  6. Toxic Release Inventory: 1.0 hour
  7. TOXMAP: 1.5 hours
  8. Household Products Database: 0.5 hour
  9. LactMed: 0.5 hour
  10. Haz-Map: 0.5 hour
  11. WISER & CHEMM: 1.0 hour
  12. REMM: 0.5 hour
  13. LiverTox: 0.5 hour

Space in the class is limited, so don’t delay registering! For questions, contact the NTC.

Save the Dates: 2015 “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” Course

Attention health science librarians in the United States who wish to initiate and/or extend bioinformatics services at your institution! The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and the NLM Training Center (NTC) will be offering “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” course in 2015. Participants who complete the class will be eligible for Medical Library Association (MLA) Continuing Education credits. The course is free, but travel costs are at the expense of the participant.

There are two parts to the course, and applicants must take both parts:

  • Part 1: “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching” is a six-week, online (asynchronous) pre-course.
  • Part 2: A five-day in-person course offered on-site at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland.

Important Dates:

  • Monday, September 29, 2014 – Watch for a detailed announcement about the course and application process in the NLM Technical Bulletin.
  • Monday, November 17, 2014 – Application deadline.
  • Monday, December 15, 2014 – Acceptance notifications e-mailed.
  • Monday, January 12, 2015 – “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching” pre-course begins.
  • Monday, March 9, 2015 – “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” five-day in-person class begins at NLM.

Mark your calendars for this training opportunity!

NLM/AAHSL Leadership Fellows Program 2014-2015 Call for Applications!

The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) has announced the 2014-2015 opportunity for the leadership program jointly sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and AAHSL, with an application deadline of August 1, 2014. The NLM/AAHSL Leadership Fellows Program is focused on preparing emerging leaders for the position of library director in academic health sciences libraries. Fellows will have the opportunity to develop their knowledge and skills in a variety of learning settings, including exposure to leadership in another environment. They will be paired with mentors who are academic health sciences library directors. In addition to the individual relationship with their mentors, fellows benefit from working collaboratively with other fellows and mentors. Experienced program faculty and mentors will provide content and facilitation for the cohort. The program takes advantage of flexible scheduling and an online learning community to minimize disruption to professional and personal schedules. The sponsors will provide financial support for a small cohort of fellows and will underwrite travel and meeting expenses. Sixty-one fellows have participated in the program since its inauguration in 2002. To date, twenty-six fellows have been appointed to director positions.

The one-year program design is multi-faceted, involving three in-person leadership institutes; attendance at an Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) annual meeting; a yearlong fellow/mentor relationship; webinars and discussions on issues related to library leadership; and two weeks of site visit to the mentor’s home library. Candidates for fellow should have a strong interest in pursuing a directorship in academic health sciences libraries, as well as significant management experience. Applications are welcomed from professionals working in academic health sciences libraries, hospital libraries, or other library-related settings. Details about the program design, schedule, and application process are available in the program brochure.

NLM Mourns William G. Harless, PhD, Creator of the First Natural Language Computer Patient Simulation Model

William G. Harless, President and CEO of Interactive Drama Inc. and former National Library of Medicine employee and contractor, passed away this past May. Dr. Harless’ contributions to the NLM were many, including the creation of the first voice-activated interactive video patient simulation model in the mid-1980s. As Director of NLM’s Technological Innovations in Medical Education (TIME) Project, he received the 1986 NLM Regents Award for Scholarship or Technical Achievement and an award in the category of Best Educational Achievement at the University of Nebraska, both for the development of his model which combined voice recognition, interactive video, and computer technologies.

Bill Harless held a PhD degree in psychology and learning theory. He also had held faculty positions at five major universities and the Union for Experimenting Colleges and Universities, where accredited doctorate degrees are awarded from a multidisciplinary, experientially based curriculum. He developed the first natural language computer patient simulation model at the University of Illinois School of Medicine in Chicago in the early 1960s. Dr. Harless published over 50 articles on natural language interactive simulation as a learning strategy and was a recognized expert in the field. In 1991, he was awarded a patent for his voice-controlled video simulation model. He was awarded a second patent in 1996 for his dynamic prompting system. In 2005, a third patent was awarded on a method of distributing his model over a computer network, and in 2010 he was awarded a patent for his method for analyzing natural language text to yield a meaningful response to a free-speech inquiry.

NIH Disaster Research Response Project Workshop June 12-13 in Bethesda

Disaster Research Response Workshop: Enabling Public Health Research During Disasters will be held June 12-13, 2014, at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) campus in Bethesda, MD. There is no registration cost. This workshop will examine strategies and partnerships for methodologically and ethically sound public health and medical research during future emergencies. Discussions will include issues with obtaining informed consent, obtaining approval from Institutional Review Boards, coordinating research efforts with emergency response, and ensuring timely collection of data. The workshop is a collaboration of the NIH Disaster Research Response Project, the IOM Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events, the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The NIH Disaster Research Response Project is a pilot project led by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and supported by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), aimed at developing ready-to-go research data collection tools and a network of trained research responders. The project’s goal is to make it as easy as possible for researchers to begin collecting health and other data following a major disaster. The focus is on data collection tools and protocols, the creation of networks of health experts also trained as research responders, and integration of the effort into federal response plans for future disasters. Although initially focused on environmental health issues, the hope is this project will be a model for timely collection of data supporting a range of medical and public health research.

As part of this project, NIEHS recently held a tabletop exercise in Long Beach, CA, to test how a “research response” might work and what would be expected of researchers choosing to be trained research responders, i.e. first on the scene to begin collecting data once it is safe and reasonable to do so. The article “Tsunami exercise helps prepare research community for disaster response” describes the exercise and there is also a video. The “Disaster Lit” section of the Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health (from NLM) now includes records for research tools, such as online surveys and interview scripts, to aid researchers in quickly selecting appropriate measures.

NLM Announces Biomedical Informatics Course, in Partnership with Georgia Regents University!

The National Library of Medicine has announced that Georgia Regents University (GRU) will serve as the host organization for the NLM-sponsored biomedical informatics course. The NLM Biomedical Informatics Course, now entering its 22nd year, offers participants a week-long immersive experience in biomedical informatics taught by experts in the field. The course was previously held at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, MA, with Cathy Norton, MLS, as the MBL principal investigator. NLM plans to take the skills shaped over the past two decades at MBL to its new colleagues at GRU. The first course organized at Georgia Regents University will be held September 14-20, 2014, followed by an additional session April 12-18, 2015. The course will be held at a conference center at the Brasstown Resort in Young Harris, GA, at no cost to participants.

Application to the course is open to anyone, but space is limited. Preference will be given to American applicants who demonstrate, through a brief application letter, that they have the significant need for an understanding of the informatics solutions that are available to address their biomedical research, practice and education challenges and that, through their official position, they are significant “change agents” who can influence the adoption of best practices in their own environment and expand the influence of the course to others through teaching or by example. The application deadline is July 7.

The course, co-directed by James J. Cimino, MD, Chief, Laboratory for Informatics Development at the National Library of Medicine and the NIH Clinical Center, and NLM Director Donald Lindberg, MD, will guide participants through topics including biomedical informatics methods, clinical informatics, big data and imaging, genomics, consumer health informatics, mathematical modeling, and telemedicine and telehealth. The co-principal investigators from GRU are Brenda L. Seago, MLS, MA, PhD, Professor and Director of Libraries, and Kathy J. Davies, MLS, Chair, Research and Education Services, Robert B. Greenblatt, MD Library.

Terrence Sejnowski to Give the 2014 Joseph Leiter NLM/MLA Lecture, June 12, 2014

Terrence Sejnowski, PhD, will give the 2014 Joseph Leiter NLM/Medical Library Association (MLA) Lecture, “The BRAIN Initiative: Connecting the Dots,” on Thursday, June 12, 2014, at 10:00 am PDT at the National Library of Medicine. The lecture will be recorded and broadcast live on the Web. Dr. Sejnowski is a pioneer in computational neuroscience and his goal is to understand the principles that link brain to behavior. His laboratory uses both experimental and modeling techniques to study the biophysical properties of synapses and neurons and the population dynamics of large networks of neurons. New computational models and new analytical tools have been developed to understand how the brain represents the world and how new representations are formed through learning algorithms for changing the synaptic strengths of connections between neurons. By studying how the resulting computer simulations can perform operations that resemble the activities of the hippocampus, Dr. Sejnowski hopes to gain new knowledge of how the human brain is capable of learning and storing memories. This knowledge ultimately may provide medical specialists with critical clues to combating Alzheimer’s disease and other disorders that rob people of the critical ability to remember faces, names, places and events.

Dr. Sejnowski is an Investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and holds the Francis Crick Chair at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies. He is also a Professor of Biology at the University of California, San Diego, where he is co-director of the Institute for Neural Computation and co-director of the Temporal Dynamics of Learning Center. He has published over 400 scientific papers and 12 books, including The Computational Brain, with Patricia Churchland. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and the National Academy of Engineering, one of only 13 living persons to be a member of all 3 national academies. Dr. Sejnowski was instrumental in shaping the BRAIN Initiative that was announced from the White House on April 2, 2013, and serves on the Advisory Committee to the Director of NIH for the BRAIN Initiative.

NLM Launches New Exhibition-related Resources: Online Adaptation of “Pick Your Poison,” Educational Resources for “From DNA to Beer”

Advertisement for medicinal drops to relieve toothache, Lloyd Manufacturing Co., 1885The National Library of Medicine has launched an online adaptation of Pick Your Poison: Intoxicating Pleasures and Medical Prescriptions, an exhibition with education resources that features items from the National Library of Medicine’s historical collection as well as the National Museum of American History in Washington, DC.

Mind-altering drugs have been used throughout the history of America. While some remain socially acceptable, such as alcohol and nicotine, others, like heroin and cocaine, are now outlawed because of their toxic, and intoxicating, characteristics. These classifications have shifted at different times in history, and will continue to change. This exhibition explores some of the factors that have shaped the changing definition of some of our most potent drugs.

Pick Your Poison includes a “Digital Gallery,” a selection of digitized, historical texts from the History of Medicine Division’s diverse collections, providing viewers new avenues to explore beyond the exhibition. Education resources include a lesson plan for grades 10-12 that investigates the exhibition content; two higher education modules; and an online activity. In addition, the web feature “Additional Resources at NLM” includes a selection of published contemporary articles on the various substances featured in the exhibition, available through PMC, which provides free access to over 2.8 million life science journal articles.

The online adaption of From DNA to Beer: Harnessing Nature in Medicine and Industry is expanded to include education resources. From DNA to Beer explores some of the processes, problems, and potential inherent in technologies that use life such as antibiotics and human growth hormones. The education resources delve into different aspects of the exhibition content, and include a lesson plan for grades 7-9; a higher education module; and an array of eight online activities. In addition, Additional Resources at NLM includes a selection of molecular models of the various bacteria and proteins related to the exhibition narrative, which are provided by the National Center of Biotechnology Information.