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Archive for the ‘Education & Training’ Category

NLM to Host National Digital Stewardship Residency Symposium on April 8, 2014

On April 8, 2014, the inaugural cohort of National Digital Stewardship Residents will present a symposium entitled Emerging Trends in Digital Stewardship at the National Library of Medicine (NLM), on the NIH campus in Bethesda, MD. The symposium will consist of panel presentations on topics including preserving social media and collaborative workspaces, open government and open data, and digital strategies for public and non-profit institutions. It will also feature a demonstration of BitCurator, an environment of digital forensics tools designed to help collecting institutions manage born-digital materials, developed by the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (SILS), and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH). The symposium is free and open to the public. Pre-registration is encouraged.

The National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) is an initiative of the Library of Congress (LC) and Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), to “provide a robust, hands-on learning experience to complement graduate-level training and education.”  The inaugural cohort began their residency at Washington, DC area libraries, museums, and cultural institutions in September 2013. Ten residents are embedded in institutions around the area, each completing a project related to an aspect of digital preservation and stewardship. The NDSR program aims to “serve the American people by developing the next generation of stewards to collect, manage, preserve, and make accessible our digital assets.” NLM serves as a host institution for the National Digital Stewardship Residency, and since September has worked with its NDSR Resident Maureen Harlow to develop a thematic Web archive collection. This project builds on a pilot Web archive collection completed by NLM and featured in The Signal blog of the Library of Congress, in October 2012.

Webinars and Workshops about Outreach Evaluation!

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) offers a range of webinars and workshops upon request by network members and coordinators from the NN/LM regions. Take a look at the list and see if one of the options appeals to you. To request a workshop or webinar, contact Susan Barnes. The workshops were designed as face-to-face learning opportunities, but can be tailored to meet distance learning needs by distilling them to briefer webinars or offering them in series of one-hour webinars. If you don’t see what you’re looking for on the list, then contact Susan and let her know!

Classroom Activities and Lesson Plans for NLM Native Voices Exhibition

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Division of Specialized Information Services K-12 Workgroup has released classroom activities and lesson plans to supplement the Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness web site. For grades 6-12, these classroom activities and lesson plans familiarize students to the health and medicine of Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. The activities and lesson plans use Native Voices exhibition web site content material and other NLM online educational/science resources.

The activities and lesson plans are composed of four units. Each unit introduces a different way of exploring and learning about the Native Voices exhibition in about 1.5 to 3 hours. These units are: 1) A scavenger hunt, 2) An environmental health science lesson, 3) A social science lesson, and 4) A biology lesson. While the activities and lesson plans can be used in science classrooms, clubs, and programs, they can be used also to reinforce the history and societal developments of Native peoples in social science and history classrooms.

The Native Voices Web site allows people to experience an exhibition currently on display at NLM in Bethesda, Maryland. Both versions explore the connection between wellness, illness, and cultural life through a combination of interviews with Native people and interactive media. For additional information, contact Alla Keselman, PhD, K-12 Team Leader, National Library of Medicine.

Librarian’s Guide to NCBI Five-Day Course in April 2014

The NCBI, in partnership with the National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC), will offer the Librarian’s Guide to NCBI course on the NIH campus in April 2014. This will be the second presentation of the course; it was previously offered in the spring of 2013. After the course, lecture slides and hands-on practical exercises will be posted on the education area of the NCBI FTP site and video tutorials of the course lectures will be available on the NCBI YouTube channel. Materials from the 2013 course are currently available.

A Librarian’s Guide is an intense five-day exploration of modern molecular biology, genetic, and other biomedical data as represented at the NCBI. The course explains how and why these data are generated, their importance in modern biomedical research, and how to access them through the NCBI Web site. It is intended for medical librarians in the United States who currently are offering bioinformatics education and support services to their patrons or are planning to offer such services in the future. More information is available in the newest NCBI Insights blog post.

All applicants for A Librarian’s Guide must have successfully completed the asynchronous online Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching class, which is a six-week introduction to molecular biology and bioinformatics taught by Diane Rein, Ph.D., MLS, and offered through the NTC. The Fundamentals course is open to any medical librarian in the United States interested in an introduction to bioinformatics and NCBI resources.  A winter 2014 Fundamentals class, which runs from February 10 – March 21, 2014, is open for applications. Only people who have successfully completed the Fundamentals class may apply to A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI. The application process for eligible Fundamentals candidates will be announced in February 2014.

Continuing Education Course Materials for MLA Disaster Information Specialization Available from NLM!

MLA Disaster Information Specialization Program logoDisaster health information courses and supporting materials are now available from the Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) at the National Library of Medicine. The courses are open to anyone at no cost and are approved for Medical Library Association (MLA) continuing education credit. Completion of a series of courses may be used toward the MLA Disaster Information Specialization certificate. The application fee is $55 for MLA members and $75 for non-members. To earn the Basic certificate, students complete the following required 15 hours of courses:

An additional 12 hours of courses can be used toward the Advanced level certificate:

Course materials may be used and adapted by anyone giving presentations or classes on this content. When using or adapting materials, please give credit to the original course authors and NLM. DIMRC would like to hear about the use of these course materials and what they can offer (improve) that would make it easier to teach this material. If you are interested in being an online or classroom instructor for one or more of these courses, please send your name, title, organization, city, and state/country to Katie Chan.

Many thanks to MLA for coordinating the initial development of courses and for hosting the course materials and registration on their web site (with funding from NLM)!

Institute for Research Design in Librarianship: June 16-26 in Los Angeles

The Institute for Research Design in Librarianship is a great opportunity for an academic librarian who is interested in conducting research. Research and evaluation are not necessarily identical, although they do employ many of the same methods and are closely related. This Institute is open to academic librarians from all over the country. If your proposal is accepted, your attendance at the Institute will be paid for, as will your travel, lodging, and food expenses. Proposals are due by February 1, 2014. Details are available at the Institute’s Prepare Your Proposal web site. Applicants accepted to the program will be notified by March 1, 2014. The Institute is particularly interested in applicants who have identified a real-world research question and/or opportunity.

The William H. Hannon Library has received a three-year grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to offer a nine-day continuing education opportunity for academic and research librarians. Each year 21 librarians will receive instruction in research design and a full year of support to complete a research project at their home institutions. The summer Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) is supplemented with pre-institute learning activities and a personal learning network that provides ongoing mentoring. The institutes will be held on the campus of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.

Apply to Attend the Winter 2014 Online Class “Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching”

Health science librarians in the United States are invited to participate in the next offering of the online bioinformatics training course, Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching, sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, NLM Training Center (NTC). This rigorous course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI. Attending this course will improve your ability to initiate or extend bioinformatics services at your institution. Prior knowledge of molecular biology and genetics is not required. This course is a prerequisite for the face-to-face workshop, Librarian’s Guide to NCBI.

The major goal of this course is to provide an introduction to bioinformatics theory and practice in support of developing and implementing library-based bioinformatics products and services. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course encompasses visualizing bioinformatics end-user practice, places a strong emphasis on hands-on acquisition of NCBI search competencies, and a working molecular biology vocabulary, through self-paced hands-on exercises. This course is offered online (asynchronous) from February 10 – March 21, 2014. The course format includes video lectures, readings, a molecular vocabulary exercise, an NCBI discovery exercise, and other hands-on exercises. The instructor is Diane Rein, Ph.D., MLS, Bioinformatics and Molecular Biology Liaison from the Health Science Library, University at Buffalo.

Due to limited enrollment, interested participants are required to complete an application form. The deadline for completing the application is January 10, 2014; participants will be notified of acceptance on January 22, 2014. The course is offered at no cost to participants. Participants who complete all assignments and the course evaluation by the due dates within the course will receive fifteen hours of MLA CE credit. No partial CE credit is granted. Participants who complete the required coursework and earn full continuing education credit will be eligible to apply to attend the five-day Librarian’s Guide that will be offered in April 2014 if they so choose.

Visit the Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching webpage for more information and to apply. If you have any questions, e-mail the course organizers.

New AHRQ Tool to Assess Patient Education Materials!

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has just released a new tool to help professionals choose more understandable and actionable materials; the Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool (PEMAT). Patient educational materials, such as brochures, medical instructions, and audiovisual aids, are often complex and lack clear information about what the patient should do. AHRQ’s PEMAT and User’s Guide provides a systematic method to evaluate and compare the understandability and actionability of patient education materials. By selecting health materials that score better on the PEMAT, you can be more confident that people of varying levels of health literacy will be able to process and explain key messages, and identify what they can do based on the information presented.

Additional tools for improving health literacy are available from AHRQ’s website, including:

New NLM Traveling Exhibition “From DNA to Beer: Harnessing Nature in Medicine and Industry”

The Era of Antibiotics, painted by Robert A. Thom for Parke, Davis & Company, 1950s. Printed with Permission of American Pharmacists Association Foundation. Copyright 2009 APhA Foundation.NLM’s Exhibition Program has announced a new traveling banner exhibit, From DNA to Beer: Harnessing Nature in Medicine and Industry, now available for booking! A link to the online exhibition is also available. From DNA to Beer: Harnessing Nature in Medicine and Industry explores some of the processes, problems, and potential inherent in technologies that use microorganisms for health and commercial purposes. Over the past two centuries, scientists, in partnership with industry, have developed techniques using and modifying life forms like yeast, molds, and bacteria, to create a host of new therapies and produce better foods and beverages. The exhibition illustrates the history of this dynamic relationship among microbes, medicine, technology, and industry, which has spanned centuries.

For questions about the traveling exhibit, contact nlmtravelingexhibits@mail.nlm.nih.gov. For information on currently available and future NLM traveling exhibits, please visit the Exhibition Program website.

New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum Website Now Available!

The New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum (NECDMC) offers openly available materials that librarians can use to teach research data management (RDM) best practices to students in the sciences, health sciences, and engineering fields, at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The materials in the curriculum are openly available, with lecture notes and slide presentations that librarians teaching RDM can customize for their particular audiences. The curriculum also has a database of real life research cases that can be integrated into the curriculum to address discipline specific data management topics. The project has been led by the Lamar Soutter Library at the University of Massachusetts Medical School with funding from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, New England Region.

The Lamar Soutter Library developed the Frameworks for a Data Management Curriculum with Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 2011. Over the past year the Soutter Library has partnered with librarians from Tufts University, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Northeastern University, and the Marine Biological Laboratory and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, to fully develop the curriculum’s lecture content, readings, activities, and slide presentations.

Some libraries will be piloting the curriculum at their institutions and conducting evaluations with students of the learning modules. If you are teaching or plan to teach RDM, you are invited to pilot the NECDMC. For more information about being a pilot partner, please contact Donna Kafel.