Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About PSR | Contact PSR | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for the ‘Education & Training’ Category

Forum on March 7: Using Data to Improve Clinical Patient Outcomes

On March 7 the NN/LM Pacific Northwest (PNR) and MidContinental (MCR) Regions are co-sponsoring a forum that will provide an overview of current and potential uses of patient data to improve patient safety, quality of care and evidence-based practice, Using Data to Improve Clinical Patient Outcomes. The event will be live streamed, linking presenters and participants in videoconference studios located at the University of Washington in Seattle and University of Utah in Salt Lake City. Librarian participants will have the opportunity to explore how they can contribute to the use of clinical data as evidence and what skills they can develop to support health care organizations in the use of data. Online or in-person attendance options are available. Registration is free, but required. The session will be archived, and a captioned recording will be made available within a few weeks of the event.

In preparation for this forum, both Regions are offering Data Curation / Management Journal Clubs, using both the MLA’s Discussion Group Program structure along with the new PubMed Commons Journal Clubs (PCJC) structure. Look forward to their analysis of recent data curation/management articles in the Plains to Peaks and Dragonfly newsletters!

Upcoming NCBI Webinars: Sequence Read Archive (SRA) and Resources for Cancer Research

Five ways to submit next-gen sequence data to NCBI’s Sequence Read Archive (SRA)
Wed, February 17, 2016, 10:00-11:00 am PT
In this webinar you will learn how to use five different ways to submit your next gen sequence data to NCBI’s Sequence Read Archive. These include external submission services through Illumina’s BaseSpace, MOTHUR (for microbial ecology data) and the iPlant Collaborative. In addition NCBI provides the new SRA submission portal and soon will offer the ability to upload data to SRA through FTP and the Aspera command line client in the new submission portal.

NCBI resources for cancer research
Wed, March 2, 2016, 10:00-11:00 am PT
This workshop provides an overview of NCBI molecular resources for cancer researchers. In the first part of the webinar you will learn to more effectively use the Entrez text-based search system and the BLAST sequence similarity search tool to find data relevant to cancer research including sequence, variation, gene and expression information. The second part of the presentation will focus on accessing large-scale genomics datasets. You will learn how to search for, access and download DNA-seq, RNA-seq, Epigenomics and Metagenomics datasets and how to access the tools and APIs at NCBI that can be used to extract relevant subsets of that data for cancer research.

National Library of Medicine Announces MedPix®, Free Online Medical Image Database

MedPix Home Page – NLM’s Medical Image DatabaseThe National Library of Medicine has announced the launch of MedPix®, a free online medical image database originally developed by the Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Informatics at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, MD. The MedPix collection categorizes and classifies the image and patient data for each of several subsets of image database applications (e.g. radiology, pathology, ophthalmology, etc.). The content material is both high-quality and high-yield and includes both common and rare conditions. Most cases have a proven diagnosis (pathology, clinical follow-up). The teaching file cases are peer-reviewed by an Editorial Panel. The primary target audience includes resident and practicing physicians, medical students, nurses and graduate nursing students and other post-graduate trainees. The material is organized by disease category, disease location (organ system), and by patient profiles.

The foundation for MedPix was a radiology study tool that was originally developed by Dr. J.G. Smirniotopoulos in 1984. In the early 1990s, as radiology was moving from film to digital imaging, there was simultaneously a merger of the diagnostic imaging residency programs of the two premier military hospitals: Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the National Naval Medical Center. In the summer of 1999, a Web-based digital teaching file based on the radiology study tool was built at USUHS to allow the two military training programs to share teaching file cases, a training requirement. Soon, other military hospitals and several civilian institutions joined MedPix. Over the past 16 years, MedPix has amassed an impressive collection of over 53,000 images from over 13,000 cases. Continuing Medical Education (CME) and Nurse Education (CNE) were added to the MedPix system in 2001.

As a public education service, the NLM and MedPix provide the storage service, indexing, and Web server hosting. Individuals as well as institutions may participate. Contributed content may be copyrighted by the original author/contributor. No additional software is required; an Internet browser is all you need!

Call for Applications for NIH Funded Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Fellowship

Precision medicine’s promise to deliver the right treatment at the right time relies on our ability to extract information from high-dimensional data sets that combine traditional clinical data in electronic health records with data generated by high- throughput technologies. To meet this challenge, new approaches for data representation, integration, analysis, visualization and sharing need to be developed collaboratively by quantitative scientists, biomedical researchers, clinicians, and bioethicists.

Fellowship applications are now being accepted for a joint Weill Cornell Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medicine, and University of Minnesota week-long Big Data Coursework for Computational Medicine (BDC4CM) funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). BDC4CM will emphasize how to navigate the interface between research and practice by offering participants in-depth lectures, case studies and hands-on training from leading researchers in academia and industry. The course will be held on July 11-14, 2016 at Weill Cornell Medicine, in New York City.

Applicants must be faculty, scientists, post-doctoral fellows and researchers with a PhD, MD, or equivalent in computer science, biomedical informatics, bioinformatics, statistics, health information technology or a related degree, or graduate students enrolled in a PhD, MD, or equivalent program in these fields. For additional information about the program and to apply, visit the CFA website. The deadline for application submission is March 15, 2016.

Michael E. DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award Nominations Due May 1!

The Friends of the National Library of Medicine seek your nominations for this year’s Michael E. DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award.

  • Nominees must be currently employed as a health sciences librarian and have worked in such a position for at least five years immediately preceding the award.
  • Nominations may be made for contributions by the librarian as demonstrated by excellence and achievement in leadership, publications, teaching, research, special projects or any combination of these.
  • Nominations must be in writing and contain at least the following elements:
    1. Official nomination form
    2. Five page description of the nominee’s achievements
    3. Current resume or curriculum vitae
    4. Any additional information (no more than 10 pages) that would assist the jury in the evaluation of the nomination and selection of the recipient.
  • Self-nominations are accepted and encouraged.
  • Nominations must be received by May 1, 2016, and can be submitted via mail, email or fax.

NTC Webinar: Teaching Topics on February 19

Join members of the National Library of Medicine Training Center for three quick online presentations related to teaching topics. Jessi Van Der Volgen will discuss tips and tools for creating video tutorials. Cheryl Rowan will talk about including audience culture and diversity in your training sessions and Rebecca Brown will demonstrate how to integrate Zaption into your online training to add interactive opportunities to videos. Register now for this one-hour session on Friday, February 19, at 10:00 AM PST!

MeSH Webinar: “2016 MeSH Highlights” on January 20

On January 20, join NLM staff for a highlights tour of the 2016 Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). A 30-minute presentation will feature a MeSH tree clean-up project; a new Clinical Study publication type; changes to the trees for diet, food and nutrition; restructuring in pharmacology and toxicology; and new terms in psychology and health care. Following the presentation, Indexing and MeSH experts will be available to answer your questions.

Webinar: 2016 MeSH Highlights
Date and time: Wednesday, January 20, 2016, at 9:00 am PST
View a recording of the presentation.

For more information about 2016 MeSH, see What’s New for 2016 MeSH and the Introduction to MeSH – 2016.

Webinar Series: Mapping an Outreach Project: Start with Information; End with a Plan

If you want to develop a project that requires stakeholder support, you need more than a solid plan. You need to build the case for both the need and potential success of your program. In February, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) will offer a four-session webinar series on how to use program evaluation tools and methods to develop a program plan that you can promote to stakeholders, such as funding or partnering organizations. Community assessment will allow you to gather compelling information about the need and viability of your project, as well as help you build relationships with potential partners. You will learn about planning tools that help you connect program activities to desired outcomes and add a strong evaluation component to your project proposal. The information in this workshop will help you organize both your project ideas and supporting data in preparation for proposal writing.

  • (Webinar 1) How people adopt new ideas. Know the factors that influence people to adopt new ideas and technology so you can choose the best strategies for your project.
  • (Webinar 2) Meeting the Community through Community Assessment. Gather community information that is most effective for planning your project.
  • (Webinar 3) Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Programs. Use a project-planning tool that allows you to logically link resources and activities to desired results.
  • (Webinar 4) Adding Evaluation to Your Plan and Next Steps: Proposal Writing. Incorporate evaluation into your project and understand how your plan can be expanded into a full proposal.

Dates and Times: This webinar series will be offered at two different times during the month of February. (Sessions will be recorded for those who with schedule conflicts.)

  • Session 1: Classes will meet Monday 2/1; Wednesday 2/3; Monday 2/8; and Wednesday 2/10. All sessions will be held from 9am-10am PST.
  • Session 2: Classes will meet Tuesday 2/16; Thursday 2/18; Tuesday 2/23; and Thursday 2/25. All sessions will be held from 1pm-2pm PST.

Registration is required. To sign up, go to the Mapping an Outreach Project webpage to select your preferred session and click on “Register” to fill out the registration form. Participants are eligible to receive 1, 2, 3, 4, or 8 hours of continuing education (CE) credit from the Medical Library Association. One hour of CE will be earned for each live or recorded webinar attended (up to 4 CEs), and an extra four CEs can be earned for a four-part homework assignment. All webinars must be viewed and homework completed and sent to the instructor by the deadline.

104 libraries selected to host traveling exhibition on Native concepts of health and illness

The American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office, on behalf of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), has announced the 104 libraries that will host Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness, a traveling exhibition to U.S. libraries. Native Voices explores the interconnectedness of wellness, illness and cultural life for Native Americans, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians. Stories drawn from both the past and present examine how health for Native People is tied to community, the land and spirit. Through interviews, Native People describe the impact of epidemics, federal legislation, the loss of land and the inhibition of culture on the health of Native individuals and communities today.

The exhibition will tour the United States from February 2016 through June 2020. Selected sites from Pacific Southwest Region include:

Arizona

  • A. T. Still University of the Health Sciences, Mesa
  • Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Yuma County Library District, Yuma

California

  • Alpine Branch, San Diego County Library, Alpine
  • Humboldt State University, Arcata
  • California State University, Bakersfield
  • California State University Channel Islands, Camarillo
  • California State University, Fresno
  • University of Redlands, Redlands
  • Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation, Smith River
  • Springfield College, Tustin
  • City of Watsonville, Watsonville

Hawaii

  • University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo

Nevada

  • University of Nevada, Reno

Upcoming NCBI Webinars: Eukaryotic Genome Data Curation and NCBI Graphical Viewers

Join NCBI staff for the upcoming webinars on RefSeq and NCBI Graphical Viewers (including Sequence Viewer and Variation Viewer):

Eukaryotic Genome Data Curation at NCBI
Tuesday, January 5, 2016, 10:00-11:00 am PST
What do a fish, a plant, and a protozoan have in common? These are all example organisms for which NCBI Reference Sequence (RefSeq) staff manually examine and improve the scientific data in NCBI Assembly, Gene, Genome, and RefSeq (among other) databases. The RefSeq project spans viruses to human and in this webinar, three RefSeq biocurators will focus on aspects of data curation for eukaryotic organisms. We will discuss several aspects of manual curation including sequence analysis, functional annotation, data validation and community collaboration. We will also highlight how these curation efforts improve the programmatic approaches used by RefSeq genome annotation pipelines, which allow NCBI to handle the ever-increasing amount of data generated by researchers.

NCBI Minute: New track options for getting the most out of NCBI Graphical Viewers
Thursday, January 7, 2016, 9:00-9:15 am PST
New track options in the NCBI graphical viewers and genome browsers provide powerful features including seven different NCBI Recommended Track Sets, the ability to create, save and share custom track sets as a collection in My NCBI. You will learn how to use these new features as well see how to search and quickly find relevant tracks and to upload your own custom data. This webinar will help you get the most out of the NCBI Graphical Sequence Viewer, Variation Viewer and other NCBI graphical browsers.

Visit the NCBI Webinars and Courses webpage to view archived webinars and materials, and to learn about future webinars. Archived webinars can also be accessed on the NCBI YouTube channel.