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Archive for the ‘Consumer Health’ Category

NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine Fall 2015 Issue Available Online!

Cover of NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine Fall 2015 IssueThe Fall 2015 issue of NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine features topics including migraine headaches, planning for a healthy school year, understanding and managing head lice, delirium research, and the NIH precision medicine imitative. The cover features Cindy McCain, the wife of U.S. Senator John McCain. She discusses how she has dealt with the problems of migraines, and how she is working to raise public awareness and understanding of migraines and increase support for research.

The issue also features a health information literacy project teaching high school students to use and promote MedlinePlus. Developed by the South Carolina Area Health Education Consortium (AHEC) and the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), students learned to use the health information resources of the NLM to create health literacy comic books, and gained valuable experience accessing these tools to continually improve their health literacy and answer other health-related questions they or their parents will have in the future.

NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine is the free, trusted consumer guide to the vast array of authoritative online health and medical information in MedlinePlus. Published four times a year, the magazine showcases the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) latest medical research and healthcare information. NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine is freely available as a print subscription, e-mail alerts, and online.

Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD) Feedback Requested

The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health, in partnership with the National Library of Medicine, is inviting public comment on the Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD). Launched in June 2013, DSLD now provides all the information from the labels of 50,000 dietary supplement products marketed in the United States. ODS is particularly interested in comments about features to add and functionality improvements that would make the DSLD a more useful tool to users. A federal stakeholder panel for the DSLD will consider all comments received. ODS welcomes input from academic researchers, government agencies, the dietary supplement industry, and other interested parties, including consumers.

ODS would like would like to receive ideas and suggestions for how the DSLD might evolve. What features might be added, improved, or enhanced—for example, in capabilities related to search, sorting, organization, and downloading of information that would make it a more valuable tool for users? All comments should be sent to ODS@nih.gov, and must be received by 11:59 p.m. eastern time, November 27, 2015. The full announcement is available in the Federal Register notice: Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on the Dietary Supplement Label Database.

NIH Observes National Native American Heritage Month in November

November is National Native American Heritage Month (NNAHM), a time to recognize the accomplishments of this country’s first inhabitants. As the early inhabitants of this land, the native peoples of North America have their own tribal orientations, language origins, and cultural histories. Today, many healing techniques that are practiced have been adopted from traditions that originate from various Native American tribes. This year’s NNAHM theme, Tribal Diversity: Weaving Together Our Traditions, highlights spirituality as an inseparable element of healing in medicine. Healing the physical parts of a patient is not enough; one must acknowledge the importance of emotional wellness, as influenced by Native American rituals and traditions.

This month is dedicated to building new avenues of opportunity for Native Americans by making critical investments to improve health, to strengthen tribal communities, and to promote educational opportunities at the NIH. Maintaining an inclusive biomedical research workforce with a diversity of talent is critical to the NIH mission of fostering new discoveries and promoting the highest level of scientific integrity to improve the nation’s health. NNAHM allows the opportunity for every individual to learn more about the distinctive backgrounds and heritages of Native Americans. You can show support during National Native American Heritage Month by actively engaging with the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion’s (EDI’s) social media campaign, including the month-long NIH Twitter campaign. More information is located on the Strategist for the Native American Portfolio website.

New NLM Traveling Exhibition Now Available for Booking!

The Exhibition Program at the National Library of Medicine has announced booking availability for its newest traveling exhibition, For All the People: A Century of Citizen Action in Health Care Reform. When requesting booking, please provide 3 to 4 booking dates which are of interest. NLM will make every effort to find the best fit for your institution on the exhibition itinerary. The online exhibition incorporates education resources, including a K-12 lesson plan that investigates the exhibition content; a higher education module; an online activity, and a robust selection of resources including K-12 suggested readings. In addition, the Web feature, “Related Resources at NLM,” includes a selection of published articles on health care access, policy, and disparities, available through PubMed Central, which provides free access to over 3.1 million full-text biomedical and life science journal articles.

Health care reform has been a contentious political issue in the United States for more than one hundred years. From the beginning of the 20th century to today, citizens have made their voices heard in the debates. For All the People tells the lesser-known story of how movements of ordinary people helped shape the changing American health care system. The six-banner traveling exhibition highlights images from over one hundred years of citizen action for health care reform.

Bring Gaming to Your Science Classroom

Screentshot of Bohr ThruThe use of gaming in the classroom provides a new medium for teachers to introduce or reinforce key concepts in the curriculum. How to incorporate this new medium seems to have taken online webinars for teachers by storm. Yet are there enough online games that both engage students and provide a real opportunity to learn? Over the summer, the NLM had the opportunity to work with a high school teacher to create two pilot iOS game apps. This was their first attempt to map a gaming app to curriculum objectives taught in high school science. Both games include attractive game design and interactive gameplay, and offer teachers the opportunity to “pause” the game at various times for “teachable moments.” Your students will love taking a break from whiteboards and lectures to try their hand at these fun yet educational games. In addition to these two games, a third game created for the K-12 community involves the reinforcement of concepts that relate to greenhouse gas reduction, the use of renewable energies, and the value of green product purchases.

Bohr Thru: A trip Through the First 18 Elements
In this game, students become familiar with the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons necessary to build each of the first 18 elements. With the help of “Atom,” the game’s main character, students learn fun and interesting facts about the chemical elements. To reinforce content during game play, students can earn “power-ups” when they successfully add electrons to complete Bohr Models for an element.

Base Chase: “A” is to “T” as “G” is to “C”
The basic goal of this game is to reinforce matching bases and the importance these pairs play in the development of a species DNA. The game uses a jumping mechanic to collect different animals found within the African Savanna. After a player has matched enough DNA the animal appears along with “DeeNA,” a whimsical DNA strand character that delivers important information concerning DNA.

Run4Green: Help to Keep our Environment Clean
In this Mario style game, our fun Earthly character tries to collect points (gold coins) in order to purchase green products to help save our environment. Along the way, the character tries to avoid products that produce greenhouse gases and identify those that can help to reduce our carbon footprint.

Bohr Thru, Base Chase, and Run4Green require iOS 7.0 or later, are compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, and are freely available for download.

Register Now for Spanish Language Webinar on Promotores de Salud E-Learning Program on October 14!

In observance of Hispanic Heritage Month, the Office of Minority Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), will host a Spanish-language webinar discussing Promoting Healthy Choices and Community Changes: An E-learning Program for Promotores de Salud on Wednesday, October 14, at 11:30 AM PDT. Registration is required to join the webinar. The e-learning program is designed to build the capacity of promotores de salud to promote better health among individuals and communities. The e-learning program is available in both Spanish and English at no cost to participants. It provides promotores de salud with basic knowledge to promote healthy choices, and strategies to motivate behavioral changes among the community members they serve. Speakers on the webinar will discuss how the e-learning program may help promotores de salud talk to community members about chronic disease management.

October 2015 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Illustration of circuits and arrows inside a man’s brain.Check out the October issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Biology of Addiction: Drugs and Alcohol Can Hijack Your Brain
    People with addiction lose control over their actions. They crave and seek out drugs, alcohol, or other substances no matter what the cost—even at the risk of damaging friendships, hurting family, or losing jobs. What is it about addiction that makes people behave in such destructive ways? And why is it so hard to quit?
  • Keep Your Mouth Healthy: Oral Care for Older Adults
    Oral health is important for people of all ages. But the simple routine you learned as a kid—brush your teeth twice a day and floss regularly—can become more of a challenge as you get older. That’s partly why nearly 1 in 5 older Americans has untreated tooth decay. Among adults ages 75 and older, about 1 in 4 has lost all natural teeth.
  • Predicting Suicide Risk
    Researchers developed an approach that may help to identify patients most likely to attempt suicide. The experimental technique still must be tested in larger groups of people to assess its effectiveness.
  • Helping Older Loved Ones from Afar
    Many of us find that we need to help care for aging parents or other loved ones who live far away. Caregiving can be difficult and time-consuming, but it can also be rewarding.
  • Featured Website: Did You Know? Cancer Videos
    A new series of short videos from NIH explains some of the statistics and trends behind different types of cancer, including colorectal, prostate, breast, and lung cancers. Learn about related topics, such as the link between excess weight and cancer risk. To choose from more than a dozen options, open the “Choose a video” drop-down menu.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Healthy People 2020 Public Comments Open October 15 – November 13

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is soliciting written comments regarding objectives proposed for inclusion in Healthy People 2020 since the last public comment period in fall 2014. Healthy People 2020 will continue to provide opportunities for public input periodically throughout the decade to ensure that Healthy People 2020 reflects current public health priorities. During the first phase of planning for Healthy People 2020, comments were received regarding the vision, mission, and implementation. Those comments helped establish the framework for Healthy People 2020. Comments from the public also helped determine the final set of Healthy People 2020 objectives. During this round of public comment, input is requested on the objectives proposed for the following topic areas: Family Planning, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health, Preparedness, and Social Determinants of Health. The public comment period will be open from October 15, 2015 through November 13, 2015.

These proposed objectives were developed by topic area workgroups, which are led by various agencies within the Federal government. They have been reviewed by the Federal Interagency Workgroup on Healthy People 2020 and are now presented for public review and comment. You are also invited to suggest additional objectives for consideration that address critical public health issues within the 42 existing topic areas of Healthy People 2020. All proposed objectives must meet the objective selection criteria. Please review these criteria prior to reviewing and commenting on objectives.

Webinar: Public Health and Public Libraries: Librarians as Health Literacy First Responders

Join OCLC for the Public Health and Public Libraries: Librarians as Health Literacy First Responders webinar on October 21, 2015, from 12:00 – 1:00 PM PDT. This webinar will explore health-related outreach, programming, training, and funding so that your library can improve the health literacy of your community. Misinformation about health abounds in today’s info-glutted environment. What is the role of public libraries in addressing issues of accurate health information? Public libraries are uniquely positioned to contribute to healthy communities by providing informed access to reliable health information. This panel presentation provides an overview of the field of public health, highlighting innovative health promotion initiatives at public libraries, and covering training and funding resources for health-related library outreach and programming. Join the conversation about building your community’s health literacy.

Presented by:

  • Lydia N. Collins, Consumer Health Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region
  • Anita Kinney, Program Analyst, United States Access Board
  • Christian Minter, Nebraska/Education Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, MidContinental Region

Women’s Health Resources Information Portal to Be Retired

On Monday, October 5, NLM will retire the Women’s Health Resources (WHR) information portal that was started in partnership with the Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH) in 2008. Anyone accessing the site after that date will be redirected from the WHR portal to the Office of Research on Women’s Health homepage. NLM appreciates the assistance of ORWH in the development of the portal and for providing outreach project funding to libraries to promote the portal and sex and gender differences in research among university faculty and students. NLM will continue our partnership by helping ORWH develop avenues for those seeking to search NLM databases such as PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov for research on women’s health.