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Archive for the ‘Consumer Health’ Category

NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine Spring 2016 Issue Available Online!

cover of medlineplus magazine april 2016 issueThe Spring 2016 issue of NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine features topics including women and heart disease, health disparities, robotic innovations, drug-induced hearing loss, rare diseases, and fibromyalgia. The cover features Ta’Rhonda Jones, star of Fox TV’s Empire, who shares her message about cardiovascular disease among women. She describes her experience with a heart condition and her involvement in the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women movement and Red Dress Collection.

The issue also features an article about NIH’s efforts in improving minority health and reducing health disparities. Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, MD, Director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, explains the major health challenges facing minorities in the U.S. today. Dr. Pérez-Stable discusses establishing a robust research program in the health care setting where disparities may be reduced, improving cross-cultural communication between patients and health professionals, and promoting diversity in clinical research by including all minorities in both therapeutic trials and observational studies.

NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine is the free, trusted consumer guide to the vast array of authoritative online health and medical information in MedlinePlus. Published four times a year, the magazine showcases the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) latest medical research and healthcare information. NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine is freely available as a print subscription, e-mail alerts, and online.

Earth Day 2016 & NLM Environmental Health Resources

The health of the natural environment and human health are intrinsically linked, which is highlighted on April 22, Earth Day. The Division of Specialized Information Services (SIS) at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) offers a variety of resources to help Americans of all ages and backgrounds learn about the importance of environmental health:

  • Environmental Health for Children: Kids in grades 1-5 can learn about toxic substances in the home through the interactive ToxMystery. Middle schoolers can explore toxic substances in everyday environments through Tox Town, and they can learn about air pollution, chemicals, climate change, and water pollution through the Environmental Health Student Portal. Read about additional NLM resources for teachers and students that can be used for Earth Day Education.
  • Environmental Health for Indigenous Communities: Native American communities can find links to environmental health resources on American Indian Health. Information on the impacts of climate change on Arctic communities can be found at Arctic Health.
  • Environmental Hazards in Daily Life: Use the TOXNET collection of databases to explore the impact of toxic substances on your health. Check Haz-Map to learn about environmental hazards in the work environment, use LactMed to identify substances which nursing mothers should avoid, and use Household Products Database to learn about the health effects of common household chemicals.

Explore the Environmental Health and Toxicology homepage on the NLM website for more valuable environmental health resources.

Funding Opportunity: Understanding and Promoting Health Literacy Research Project Grants

HHS/National Institutes of Health (NIH) is offering a grant opportunity for Understanding and Promoting Health Literacy (R01) (PAR-13-130). The goal of this program announcement is to encourage methodological, intervention and dissemination research for understanding and promoting health literacy. The closing date for applications is May 7, 2016. Applicants are encouraged to address health literacy as it pertains to health care, prevention, healthy living, chronic disease management, community health, cultural competence, and health disparities. Research questions can focus on consumers, patients, providers, health care teams, educators, communities and organizations or systems. Application budgets are not limited, but need to reflect the actual needs of the proposed project. The total project period may not exceed five years.

National Environmental Education Week: April 17-23

The National Environmental Education Act of 1990 established the National Environmental Education and Training Foundation (NEEF) as an independent non-profit organization complementary to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), extending its ability to foster environmental education for all ages and in all segments of the American public. NEEF’s 12th annual National Environmental Education Week (EE Week), Greening STEM: Rooted in Math, is scheduled for April 17-23, 2016 (Earth Day is April 22). It encourages and celebrates environmental learning through events and projects across the country. You can also register an event.

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP) provides resources related to toxicology, environmental health, and chemistry, most notably, TOXNET, an integrated database system of hazardous chemicals, toxic releases and environmental health. The Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), a component of TOXNET, has comprehensive, peer-reviewed toxicology data for more than 5,000 chemicals. TOXMAP uses United States maps to explore data from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) and Superfund programs. The Haz-Map database contains information on the health effects of exposure to chemical and biological agents used in industry, on the job and at home.

Tox Town is a guide to toxic chemicals and environmental health issues in everyday locations. It is available in English and Spanish. The Household Products Database gives information on the potential health effects of chemicals contained in common products used inside and around the home. ToxMystery, available in English and Spanish, helps children ages 7 to 10 learn about toxic substances in the home. Tox Tutor and ToxLearn are written at the introductory college level and offer a basic introduction to toxicology.

2015 Special Edition Issue of NIH MedlinePlus Salud the Magazine

cover of magazine with former U.S. surgeon general Dr. Richard CarmonaThe 2015 Special Edition issue of NIH MedlinePlus Salud features timely information on osteoarthritis and how it impacts the Hispanic community. The cover features former U.S. surgeon general, Dr. Richard Carmona, who suffers from osteoarthritis. The issue provides insight into this degenerative joint disease and tips on managing joint pain, including maintaining a healthy diet and exercise.

According to a 2011 CDC research study, approximately 3 million Hispanics in the U.S. reported arthritic conditions but they have consistently had the highest gaps in – and least access to – health care, compared to non-Hispanic/Latino population groups. The demographic changes that are anticipated over the next two decades increase the importance of addressing health disparities within this community. One of the goals of NIH MedlinePlus Salud is to increase the health literacy among the fast-growing Hispanic population across the U.S. Its purpose is to present the best in reliable, up-to-date health information and bring the latest breakthroughs from NIH-supported research, featuring people from all walks of life talking about how they’ve handled their health challenges. It is a free bilingual publication, with articles in both English and Spanish.

Print subscriptions are available at no charge for those who prefer to read a physical magazine. Additionally, visit MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español, for more free, reliable, up-to-date health information.

April 2016 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Illustration of a woman in her apartment watering her plants outside her windowCheck out the April issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Plants: Partners in Health?
    Is there anything more delicious and nutritious than vine-ripened tomatoes, just-harvested peaches and corn, or fresh herbs and spices? Growing your own edible plants—whether in a backyard garden or a few pots on your windowsill—can be fun, rewarding, and healthful. If you share your garden’s bounty with friends and neighbors, you might even expand your social connections and spread the health around.
  • Block the Buzzing, Bites, and Bumps
    Summer can be a bummer if outdoor fun is interrupted by the irritating buzz of mosquitoes. Their bites not only create itchy red bumps on your skin; they also carry the risk of disease. NIH-funded scientists are working to find better ways to diagnose, treat, and prevent mosquito-borne illnesses. And we can all take simple steps to avoid getting bit by those blood-sucking insects.
  • Testosterone Therapy Tested in Older Men
    As men age, they often produce less testosterone than they did in their youth. Testosterone is a chemical signal that contributes to male characteristics, such as a deep voice, facial hair, and muscle growth. Men with low levels of testosterone may have symptoms such as fatigue, decreased sexual desire, and difficulty walking.
  • Sidestep Sports Injuries
    Many people seem to be listening to their doctor’s advice to get active to improve their health. Playing sports can be a fun way to start moving. But a downside of getting in the game can be injuries.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

National Public Health Week: April 4-10, 2016

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) salutes National Public Health Week, from April 4-10, 2016, an initiative of the American Public Health Association. NLM is working with PHPartners: Partners in Information Access for the Public Health Workforce to promote their mission of helping the public health workforce find and use information effectively to improve and protect the public’s health.

The Outreach and Special Populations Branch of NLM provides a variety of reliable information resources to help improve public health information access, including:

For other health information resources directed towards specific populations, visit the NLM Outreach and Special Populations Branch homepage.

ICMJE Proposal for Sharing Clinical Trial Data: Submit Your Feedback by April 18!

The Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) is seeking feedback on proposed requirements for sharing clinical trial data from any interested stakeholder, including clinical trial participants, librarians, patients, editors, and researchers. Read the editorial published in Annals of Internal Medicine, “Sharing Clinical Trial Data: A Proposal from the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors” and submit your comments by April 18! You can also check out previously posted comments. Submitted comments will be posted within one business day.

March 2016 Issue of NIH News in Health Now Available!

Illustration of a worried man standing apart from a circle of friends.Check out the March issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Understanding Anxiety Disorders: When Panic, Fear, and Worries Overwhelm
    Many of us worry from time to time. We fret over finances, feel anxious about job interviews, or get nervous about social gatherings. These feelings can be normal or even helpful. They may give us a boost of energy or help us focus. But for people with anxiety disorders, they can be overwhelming.
  • The Benefits of Walking
    Thinking about adding more physical activity to your day? Walking can be a great way to get more active.
  • Featured Website: Mind Your Risks
    Many people with high blood pressure know they could be at risk for stroke and heart attack. New studies also link high blood pressure—especially in midlife (ages 45 to 65)—to an increased risk for dementia in later years. Don’t take unnecessary risks. Learn how to keep blood pressure under control.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Additionally, you can get trusted, up-to-date health information from NIH News in Health added directly to your site via NIH content syndication. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Apply by March 27 for the 2016 Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) University Challenge!

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program is excited to continue the TRI University Challenge. This is an opportunity for the academic community to find innovative ways to use TRI data to promote more informed decision-making and action on the part of communities, manufacturers, and government. The TRI Program publishes data on the disposal or other releases of over 650 toxic chemicals from thousands of U.S. industrial and federal facilities. It provides information about how facilities manage those toxic chemicals through recycling, energy recovery, and treatment. This year, the top priorities will be proposals that promote broader use of TRI data by academics and other external users and those that use TRI to measure program effectiveness.

Students and professors are encouraged to submit innovative project proposals that increase the knowledge, use, and understanding of TRI data and other related information. Institutions whose project proposals are selected will serve as 2016 TRI University Challenge partners. Partners will receive direct, non-monetary support from EPA TRI staff experts, and, depending on the outcome of their project, may receive national recognition for their project as well as speaking opportunities at conferences and events including the 2016 TRI National Training Conference.

The EPA will be accepting 2016 TRI University Challenge applications through March 27. Award applications must be submitted electronically by the deadline to be considered. Applicants will be contacted regarding their application status by June 1. An informational webinar session will be held Wednesday, February 24, from 9:00-10:00 AM PST. Contact Caitlin Briere, the TRI University Challenge lead, with any questions about participating.