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Archive for the ‘Consumer Health’ Category

Household Products Database Update

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Household Products Database (HPD) now contains over 14,000 products. The latest update includes a new product category “commercial/institutional.” Product manufacturers of the more than 300 products in this category use various descriptions, including professional grade, professional use, hospital grade, and more. Users can locate products using the new “commercial/institutional” link under “Browse by Category” on the HPD homepage or by entering the category/description terms (e.g. commercial, institutional, professional, hospital) as a Quick Search.

The Household Products Database links over 14,000 consumer brands to health effects from Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) provided by manufacturers, and allows scientists and consumers to research products based on chemical ingredients. The database is designed to help answer the following typical questions:

  • What are the chemical ingredients and their percentage in specific brands?
  • Which products contain specific chemical ingredients?
  • Who manufactures a specific brand? How do I contact this manufacturer?
  • What are the acute and chronic effects of chemical ingredients in a specific brand?
  • What other information is available about chemicals in the toxicology-related databases of the National Library of Medicine?

Information in the Household Products Database comes from a variety of publicly available sources, including brand-specific labels and Material Safety Data Sheets when available from manufacturers and manufacturers’ web sites.

September 2014 Issue of NIH News in Health is Now Available!

Illustration of a man declining a beer that’s being offered by his friend at a picnic.Check out the September issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Drinking to Excess: Recognize and Treat Alcohol Problems
    Some people enjoy an occasional glass of wine with dinner. Others might grab a beer while watching a football game. Most people drink alcohol moderately, within their limits. Others overdo it occasionally. But some people find they can’t control their drinking. How do you know when drinking is becoming a problem? And what can you do if it is?
  • Focusing on ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
    Most children get restless, rowdy, or distracted at times. That’s all part of being a kid. But some kids have such trouble paying attention, staying focused, and finishing tasks that it interferes with their schoolwork, home life, and friendships. These difficulties might be signs of a developmental disorder called attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD.
  • Genetic Sites Tied to Schizophrenia
    Researchers linked more than 100 genetic regions to schizophrenia, including 83 that were previously unrecognized. The findings may lead to new strategies for treating this serious brain disorder.
  • Featured Website: Gut Check
    This site offers easy-to-read information about screening for colorectal cancer, the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related deaths nationwide. Screening may detect growths called polyps that can be removed before they develop into cancer. It can also detect cancer early, when treatment may be most effective. Videos and other resources help you decide which screening test is right for you.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Haz-Map Update

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has updated Haz-Map with 497 new agents. It now covers 10,133 biological and chemical agents. Haz-Map is an occupational health database designed for health and safety professionals and for consumers seeking information about the health effects of exposure to chemicals and biologicals at work. Haz-Map links jobs and hazardous tasks with occupational diseases and their symptoms. More information is available from the Haz-Map Fact Sheet.

University of Maryland, Baltimore, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, Announces Release of Student Health Advocates Redefining Empowerment Curriculum

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland, Baltimore, has announced the release of the Student Health Advocates Redefining Empowerment (SHARE) Curriculum, developed as the result of a three-year Health Information Resource Grant to Reduce Health Disparities (G08LM0011079) from the National Library of Medicine. The grant aimed to empower high school students as community health advocates, improve health in Baltimore neighborhoods, and develop a replicable student health advocacy program. The entire curriculum consists of six modules. Each module can be used independently as well. The modules are:

  1. Overview of Health Disparities
  2. Quality Health Information
  3. Taking Charge of Your Health
  4. Smart Food Choices
  5. Crafting and Delivering the Message
  6. Promoting Health and Wellness in Your Community

These modules were developed after working with two cohorts of students from Vivien T. Thomas Medical Arts Academy in Baltimore. In addition to detailed lesson plans, each class has assignments and handouts and is aligned with national standards. Supplemental activities are also provided. In order to build a community around the curriculum, a blog is available to share ideas and suggestions and discuss the curriculum. For more information, please contact Project SHARE.

The National Library of Medicine Announces 2014 Association of Health Care Journalists-NLM Fellows

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ) are pleased to announce the 2014 AHCJ-NLM Fellows. This year’s class features eight reporters and editors representing diverse media backgrounds and interests. The program, now in its sixth year, brings journalists selected by AHCJ to NLM for four days of training in use of NLM’s health information resources, such as PubMed, PubMed Health, Genetics Home Reference, TOXMAP, ClinicalTrials.gov, and MedlinePlus. The Fellows also receive briefings about health care issues, such as the adoption of electronic health records by patients and health care providers, as well as consumer health resources provided by the National Cancer Institute. New in 2014, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) will update the AHCJ-NLM Fellows about innovative health care issues, such as comparative effectiveness research.

The 2014 AHCJ-NLM Fellows are:

  • Karen Bouffard, health care writer, The Detroit News. Bouffard was a 2013 National Health Journalism Fellow with the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School of Journalism.
  • Matthew Glasser, health and medical producer, NBC Southern California. Glasser is an Emmy Award-winning journalist and was the co-creator and executive producer of NurseTV and Healthcare Heroes.
  • Sarah Karlin, senior writer, The Pink Sheet and The Pink Sheet DAILY. Karlin formerly was the FDANews’ congressional and generic drugs editor.
  • Kimberly Leonard, health reporter and producer, U.S. News & World Report. Leonard was a health reporter with the Center for Public Integrity prior to joining U.S. News & World Report.
  • Cheryl Platzman Weinstock, freelance health/science writer, who specializes in women’s health issues. Weinstock’s work frequently appears in the New York Times, Women’s Day, and the Oprah Magazine. She contributed to the New York Times’ Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of 9/11.
  • Marie Powers, staff writer, BioWorld Today. Powers was part of the BioWorld Today team, which received the Best Daily Publication award in 2013 and 2014 from the Specialized Information Publishers Association.
  • Cindy Sharp, health and medical reporter, Associated Press Television and Online Video. Sharp previously worked for MSNBC and Tribune Broadcasting.
  • J.K. Wall, health care reporter, Indianapolis Business Journal, and The Dose, a blog on health care finance. Wall worked as a business reporter at The Indianapolis Star before joining the Indianapolis Business Journal.

New Resource for Pediatric-Related Disaster and Emergency Health Information

The National Library of Medicine Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) has announced a new resource directed at the needs of children in disasters and emergencies, which present unique planning challenges for health officials, responders, and providers. Multiple U.S. Department of Health and Human Services agencies and funded organizations collaborated to develop this comprehensive online guide to serve as a central source for pediatric-related disaster and emergency health information, which brings into one place professional-level materials, documents, Web sites, and articles distinctly about children from authoritative sources; including government, private, non-profit and international organizations and agencies.

To learn about this robust new resource, the collaboration behind it, and how it can make information searching more efficient, attend the next Disaster Information Specialist Webinar on Thursday, September 11, at 1:00 – 2:00 PM PDT. Four featured presenters will address the topic Not Just Small Adults: Health Resources on Children in Disasters and Emergencies.

Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources from NLM

A new web page, Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources, is now available from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC). The resources on this page may be of value to international and local organizations and individuals providing Ebola outbreak-related services in West Africa, as well as friends and family of people in the affected region.

This resource complements NLM’s activation of the the Emergency Access Initiative in support of medical efforts in West Africa. The Emergency Access Initiative is a collaborative partnership between the National Library of Medicine and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text articles from over 650 biomedical serial titles and over 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. The free access period is August 12, 2014 – September 11, 2014. The news story, NLM Launches Emergency Access Initiative, Granting Free Access to Books and Journals for Healthcare Professionals Fighting Ebola Outbreak, provides more detail on the NLM response to the Ebola outbreak.

NLM Launches Emergency Access Initiative for Healthcare Professionals Fighting Ebola Outbreak

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) has been activated to support healthcare professionals working on the Ebola public health emergency in West Africa. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from over 650 biomedical journals and over 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or supplement for libraries affected by disasters that need to continue to serve medical staff and affiliated users. It is also intended for medical personnel responding to the specified disaster. EAI is not an open access collection. It is only intended for those affected by the disaster or assisting the affected population. If you know of a library or organization involved in healthcare efforts in response to the Ebola outbreak, please let them know of this service. EAI was activated four times in the past, including following the earthquake and subsequent cholera epidemic in Haiti, flooding in Pakistan and the earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

NLM thanks the numerous participating publishers for their generous support of this initiative: American Academy of Pediatrics, American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Chemical Society, American College of Physicians, American Medical Association, American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists, ASM Press, B.C. Decker, BMJ, EBSCOHost, Elsevier, FA Davis, Mary Ann Liebert, Massachusetts Medical Society, McGraw-Hill, Merck Publishing, Oxford University Press, People’s Medical Publishing House, Springer, University of Chicago Press, Wiley and Wolters Kluwer.

Resources on Ebola

NLM has several other resources that will be helpful for people working on Ebola:

HHS agencies, including CDC and ASPR, also provide the latest Ebola information available through social media, including Twitter@phegov, @CDCgov, @CDCEmergency and Facebook Public Health Emergency, CDC, CDC Emergency Preparedness and Response. The CDC also has a comprehensive set of resources on its Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever web page.

August 2014 Issue of NIH News in Health is Now Available!

Illustration of a woman steadying herself against a wall while a concerned passerby makes a call for help.Check out the August issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Can You Recognize a Heart Attack or Stroke? What To Do When Every Moment Counts
    How would you react to a medical emergency? When it comes to life-threatening conditions like heart attack or stroke, every minute counts. Get to know the signs and symptoms of these health threats. If you think you or someone else might be having a heart attack or stroke, get medical help right away. Acting fast could save your life or someone else’s.
  • Surviving Sepsis: Taming a Deadly Immune Response
    Many people have never heard of sepsis, or they don’t know what it is. But sepsis is one of the top 10 causes of disease-related death in the United States. The condition can arise suddenly and progress quickly, and it’s often hard to recognize.
  • Transplant Reverses Sickle Cell Disease
    A specialized bone marrow transplant successfully reversed severe sickle cell disease in adults, in some cases without the need for extensive immune-suppressing drugs. Follow-up testing will be needed to further assess this experimental therapy.
  • Mind and Body Therapy for Fibromyalgia
    Fibromyalgia is a long-lasting disorder marked by widespread pain, tenderness, fatigue, and other symptoms that can interfere with daily life. An estimated 5 million American adults have the condition. It most often affects women, although men and children also can have the disorder. Unfortunately, despite ongoing research, its causes remain unknown.
  • Featured Website: Diabetes Health Sense
    About 29 million Americans have diabetes, and many more are at risk because of excess weight, family history, or age. This site offers easy access to resources that can help you eat well, stay active, and meet your health-related goals, whether you have diabetes or are at risk for the condition.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) Offers Free Online TOXNET Class This Fall!

The National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) is offering an online, asynchronous Moodle class called Discovering TOXNET from October 20 – November 14, 2014. Register now to discover TOXNET and other NLM environmental health databases through videos, guided tutorials, and discovery exercises! The class is taught online in thirteen independent modules. Participants work on their own time over a period of four weeks to complete the modules of interest. There is one required module; the remaining are optional. This class is offered for variable MLA Continuing Education credit. Each module will be offered for 0.5 to 2.0 credit hours, for a total of up to 12 hours. Credit will not be awarded for partial completion of a module. Total credit awarded will be based on completed modules with a minimum of 1.0 credit hours.

TOXNET is a web-based system of databases covering hazardous chemicals, environmental health, toxic releases, chemical nomenclature, poisoning, risk assessment and regulations, and occupational safety and health. The independent modules cover TOXLINE, ChemIDplus, TRI, TOXMAP, Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), IRIS, Haz-Map, LactMed, WISER, CHEMM, REMM, LiverTox, and more. 

The modules are:

  1. Introduction to TOXNET: 0.5 hour (Required)
  2. TOXLINE: 1.0 hour
  3. ChemIDplus: 2.0 hours
  4. Integrated Risk Information System & Risk Assessment: 1.0 hour
  5. Hazardous Substances Databank: 1.5 hours
  6. Toxic Release Inventory: 1.0 hour
  7. TOXMAP: 1.5 hours
  8. Household Products Database: 0.5 hour
  9. LactMed: 0.5 hour
  10. Haz-Map: 0.5 hour
  11. WISER & CHEMM: 1.0 hour
  12. REMM: 0.5 hour
  13. LiverTox: 0.5 hour

Space in the class is limited, so don’t delay registering! For questions, contact the NTC.