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Archive for the ‘Announcements’ Category

ARL 2016-2017 Leadership Fellows Announced

The Association of Research Libraries has selected 28 individuals to participate in the 2016–2017 Leadership Fellows program. This executive leadership program facilitates the development of future senior-level leaders in large research libraries and archives. In response to a continued need to develop future leaders of ARL member institutions, this program is designed to build on self-assessment and reflection and to explore a personal/professional area of interest in the context of a group setting. During the course of the program, each fellow will construct a learning plan; engage in a customized, immersive experience to shadow a library director; participate in three week-long institutes hosted by sponsoring ARL institutions; participate in online synchronous sessions; and attend semiannual Association Meetings.

The program begins in January 2016 and runs through April 2017. The 2016–2017 Leadership Fellows applicant pool was highly competitive. The new fellows represent a broad array of backgrounds, experiences, and institutions. Congratulations to NN/LM PSR Network member Cynthia Henderson, Associate Dean, Health Sciences Libraries at the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles, who was among those selected for the new cohort!

Apply by December 7 to attend the Winter 2016 NLM online class “Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching”

Health science librarians are invited to participate in a rigorous online bioinformatics training course, Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching, sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, NLM Training Center (NTC). The course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI. Attending this course will improve your ability to initiate or extend bioinformatics services at your institution. Prior knowledge of molecular biology and genetics is not required. The major goal of this course is to provide an introduction to bioinformatics theory and practice in support of developing and implementing library-based bioinformatics products and services. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services.

This course is offered online (asynchronously) from January 11 – February 19, 2016. The format includes video lectures, readings, a molecular vocabulary exercise, an NCBI discovery exercise, and other hands-on exercises. The instructor is Diane Rein, Ph.D., MLS, Bioinformatics and Molecular Biology Liaison from the Health Science Library, University at Buffalo. The course is a prerequisite for the face-to-face workshop, Librarian’s Guide to NCBI. Participants who complete the required coursework and earn full continuing education credit will be eligible to apply to attend the 5-day Librarian’s Guide in the future.

Due to limited enrollment, interested participants are required to complete an application form. The deadline for completing the application is December 7, 2015; participants will be notified of acceptance on December 21, 2015. The course is offered at no cost to participants. Participants who complete all assignments and the course evaluation by the due dates will receive 25 hours of MLA CE credit. No partial CE credit is granted. For questions, contact the course organizers.

NIH Observes National Native American Heritage Month in November

November is National Native American Heritage Month (NNAHM), a time to recognize the accomplishments of this country’s first inhabitants. As the early inhabitants of this land, the native peoples of North America have their own tribal orientations, language origins, and cultural histories. Today, many healing techniques that are practiced have been adopted from traditions that originate from various Native American tribes. This year’s NNAHM theme, Tribal Diversity: Weaving Together Our Traditions, highlights spirituality as an inseparable element of healing in medicine. Healing the physical parts of a patient is not enough; one must acknowledge the importance of emotional wellness, as influenced by Native American rituals and traditions.

This month is dedicated to building new avenues of opportunity for Native Americans by making critical investments to improve health, to strengthen tribal communities, and to promote educational opportunities at the NIH. Maintaining an inclusive biomedical research workforce with a diversity of talent is critical to the NIH mission of fostering new discoveries and promoting the highest level of scientific integrity to improve the nation’s health. NNAHM allows the opportunity for every individual to learn more about the distinctive backgrounds and heritages of Native Americans. You can show support during National Native American Heritage Month by actively engaging with the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion’s (EDI’s) social media campaign, including the month-long NIH Twitter campaign. More information is located on the Strategist for the Native American Portfolio website.

New NLM Traveling Exhibition Now Available for Booking!

The Exhibition Program at the National Library of Medicine has announced booking availability for its newest traveling exhibition, For All the People: A Century of Citizen Action in Health Care Reform. When requesting booking, please provide 3 to 4 booking dates which are of interest. NLM will make every effort to find the best fit for your institution on the exhibition itinerary. The online exhibition incorporates education resources, including a K-12 lesson plan that investigates the exhibition content; a higher education module; an online activity, and a robust selection of resources including K-12 suggested readings. In addition, the Web feature, “Related Resources at NLM,” includes a selection of published articles on health care access, policy, and disparities, available through PubMed Central, which provides free access to over 3.1 million full-text biomedical and life science journal articles.

Health care reform has been a contentious political issue in the United States for more than one hundred years. From the beginning of the 20th century to today, citizens have made their voices heard in the debates. For All the People tells the lesser-known story of how movements of ordinary people helped shape the changing American health care system. The six-banner traveling exhibition highlights images from over one hundred years of citizen action for health care reform.

The Medical Library Assistance Act Celebrates Its 50th Anniversary!

A recent post in the National Library of Medicine’s Circulating Now blog highlights the fifty years since the Medical Library Assistance Act was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson in October, 1965, establishing the Regional Medical Library Program, now known as the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. The first RML to be selected was the Countway Library of Medicine at Harvard Medical School; the second, the library of the New York Academy of Medicine; and the third, the library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. In all, eleven RMLs were initially established. The number of regions was later reduced to seven due to federal budget cuts, and then expanded to its current configuration of eight regions.

NLM Recruiting for 2016-17 Associate Fellowship Program!

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is accepting applications for its 2016-17 Associate Fellowship program, a one-year training program designed for recent library science graduates and early-career librarians. All U.S. and Canadian citizens who will have earned a MLS or equivalent degree in library/information science from an ALA-accredited school by August 2016 are eligible to apply. Priority is given to U.S. citizens. Applications and additional information are available on the NLM web site. The application deadline is February 12, 2016. Up to five candidates will be selected for the program.

The program is a one-year residency program (with an optional second year) for recent library science graduates interested in a career in health sciences librarianship. The program combines curriculum and project work and is located at the National Library of Medicine on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.

The Associate Fellowship provides knowledge and skills in project work ranging from:

  • Data analysis of programs and services such as extramural grants, indexed journal articles, controlled vocabularies, datasets, and customer inquiries.
  • Creation of online tutorials and educational awareness videos.
  • Social media outreach.
  • And more, including legislative tracking, web site enhancement, disaster information outreach studies, and review of next generation discovery interfaces.

The Associate Fellowship financial support includes:

  • Annual stipend of $52,668.
  • Additional funding to support purchase of group health insurance.
  • Up to $1,500 in relocation support.
  • Funding to support attendance at local and national conferences.

MeSH Browser Now Includes Link to 2016 MeSH

The default year in NLM’s MeSH Browser is currently 2015 MeSH, with an alternate link that now provides access to 2016 MeSH. Access to two years of MeSH vocabulary is always available in the MeSH Browser, the current year and an alternate year. Sometime in November or December, the default year will change to 2016 MeSH and the alternate link to the 2015 MeSH. Details on updates and download information for 2016 MeSH are forthcoming.

Applications Now Being Accepted for the Fourth CDC E-Learning Institute Fellowship

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in partnership with the Public Health Foundation (PHF), invites distance learning professionals who are responsible for developing online training products to apply to participate in the E-Learning Institute (ELI) Fellowship. The ELI Fellowship empowers education and training professionals from state and local health departments and public health organizations with the knowledge, skills, tools, and resources to create quality e-learning products. Applications will be accepted through November 13, and selected applicants will be notified by December 14. Space is limited.

This program will be conducted from February 8 to June 10, 2016. Participants will need to allocate approximately two hours per week during working hours for program activities. Participants may need to commit more time to complete the final project. Participants will also travel twice to Atlanta, GA, for the orientation and final showcase event. Fellows participate at no cost. Professionals from state, local, territorial, tribal, and international health departments responsible for developing online training products should apply. University and hospital learning professionals who are involved in public health are also encouraged to apply.

NLM Informatics Lecture Series on November 4: Use of Clinical Big Data to Inform Precision Medicine

The next session of the National Library of Medicine Informatics Lecture Series will be held on November 4, at 11:00am-12:00pm PST, with the feature presentation Use of Clinical Big Data to Inform Precision Medicine. The speaker will be Joshua Denny, MD, Associate Professor in the Departments of Biomedical Informatics and Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. This talk will be broadcast live and archived.

At Vanderbilt, Dr. Denny and his team have linked phenotypic information from de-identified electronic health records (EHRs) to a DNA repository of nearly 200,000 samples, creating a ‘virtual’ cohort. This approach allows study of genomic basis of disease and drug response using real-world clinical data. Finding the right information in the EHR can be challenging, but the combination of billing data, laboratory data, medication exposures, and natural language processing has enabled efficient study of genomic and pharmacogenomic phenotypes. The Vanderbilt research team has put many of these discovered pharmacogenomic characteristics into practice through clinical decision support. The EHR also enables the inverse experiment – starting with a genotype and discovering all the phenotypes with which it is associated – a phenome-wide association study (PheWAS). Dr. Denny’s research team has used PheWAS to replicate more than 300 genotype-phenotype associations, characterize pleiotropy, and discover new associations. They have also used PheWAS to identify characteristics within disease subtypes.

Dr. Denny is part of the NIH-supported Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network, Pharmacogenomics Research Network (PGRN), and Implementing Genomics in Practice (IGNITE) networks. He is a past recipient of the American Medical Informatics Association New Investigator Award, Homer Warner Award, and Vanderbilt Chancellor’s Award for Research. Dr. Denny remains active in clinical care and in teaching students. He is also a member of the National Library of Medicine Biomedical Library and Informatics Review Committee.

New Videos Available on the NCBI YouTube Channel

Two new three-minute videos on the NCBI YouTube channel will provide information about how to view track sets in all of the NCBI genome browsers and Sequence Viewer displays and how to store and share custom sets of tracks in track collections. NCBI Recommended Tracks presents track sets, which allow you to instantly tailor your display to a specific need, while My NCBI Track Collections: Introduction shows how to store and share tracks in custom sets called track collections. To learn more about track sets and collections, visit the FAQ on the Sequence Viewer page. Subscribe to the NCBI YouTube channel to receive alerts about new videos ranging from quick tips to full webinar presentations.