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Archive for August, 2014

NN/LM Ending Support for Internet Explorer 8

Due to recent software updates on nnlm.gov, Internet Explorer 8 is no longer supported. Some read-only sections of nnlm.gov will continue to be available via IE8. However, anyone using IE8 will probably not be able to submit assignments in online courses utilizing the NN/LM Moodle framework, and may not even be able to access and log into Moodle courses. Other nnlm.gov services that require data to be posted to the server are also likely to fail. In addition, DOCLINE will not support IE8 after the end of 2014. Please visit the NN/LM System Requirements page to see a complete list of supported browsers. For best usability, NLM recommends that libraries should begin talking to their local IT departments about upgrading their browsers to at least Internet Explorer 10.

Starting January 12, 2016, Microsoft will drop support, including security updates, for older Internet Explorer browser versions. Only the most recent version of IE for a supported operating system will receive technical support and security updates. Microsoft’s Stay up-to-date with Internet Explorer blog page provides a good explanation of why IE users should upgrade to the most current version.

New Resource for Pediatric-Related Disaster and Emergency Health Information

The National Library of Medicine Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) has announced a new resource directed at the needs of children in disasters and emergencies, which present unique planning challenges for health officials, responders, and providers. Multiple U.S. Department of Health and Human Services agencies and funded organizations collaborated to develop this comprehensive online guide to serve as a central source for pediatric-related disaster and emergency health information, which brings into one place professional-level materials, documents, Web sites, and articles distinctly about children from authoritative sources; including government, private, non-profit and international organizations and agencies.

To learn about this robust new resource, the collaboration behind it, and how it can make information searching more efficient, attend the next Disaster Information Specialist Webinar on Thursday, September 11, at 1:00 – 2:00 PM PDT. Four featured presenters will address the topic Not Just Small Adults: Health Resources on Children in Disasters and Emergencies.

NIH Seeks Input on Information Resources for Data-Related Standards Widely Used in Biomedical Science

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has issued a Request for Information (RFI) seeking comments and ideas to inform the creation of an NIH Standards Information Resource (NSIR) that would collect, organize, and make available to the public trusted, systematically organized, and curated information about data-related standards. This resource would focus on those standards that are widely used in biomedical research and related activities. The main purpose of the NSIR would be to help a variety of biomedical users such as researchers, clinicians, data curators, and informaticians, among others, identify and choose data-related standards that are best suited to their needs.

NIH seeks responses to the RFI from biomedical researchers, librarians and information scientists, bioinformaticians, publishers, and other interested individuals. All responses must be submitted electronically to BD2K_NSIR_RFI@mail.nih.gov by September 30, 2014. Please include the Notice number NOT-CA-14-053 in the subject line. Responses to this RFI Notice are voluntary. The submitted information will be reviewed by the NIH staff. Submitted information will be considered confidential.

NIH Issues Finalized Policy on Genomic Data Sharing

Genomic research advances our understanding of factors that influence health and disease, and sharing genomic data provides opportunities to accelerate that research through the power of combining large and information-rich datasets. To promote sharing of human and non-human genomic data and to provide appropriate protections for research involving human data, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued the Genomic Data Sharing (GDS) Policy on August 27, 2014. The GDS Policy takes effect for grant applications with due dates on or after January 25, 2015, for contracts submitted on or after January 25, 2015, and for intramural research projects generating genomic data on or after January 25, 2015. NIH has also issued a press release regarding the GDS Policy. A publication describing the use and impact of the NIH database for Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP) data under the Policy for Sharing of Data Obtained in NIH Supported or Conducted Genome-Wide Association Studies, from 2007 through 2013, has been published in Nature Genetics.

“Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code” Exhibit Coming to NN/LM PSR!

With eye-catching models, interactive displays and engaging elements, the Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code exhibition is going on tour after having completed a 14-month engagement at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. On Sept. 1, 2014, the contemporary, high-impact exhibition, a collaboration between the museum and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health, starts engagements at museums and science centers throughout North America.

genome_exhibit

The exhibit opened a decade after the completion of the Human Genome Project and 60 years after the discovery of the double-helical structure of DNA by Drs. James Watson and Francis Crick. Dr. Watson toured the exhibition in July, one of its estimated 3 million visitors since the opening. Museum designers and education programming experts took almost two years to conceptualize and build the 4,400 square-foot exhibition. By illustrating and explaining genomics, the exhibition offers visitors a new perspective from which to view oneself, as an individual, a member of a family, a representative of a species, and part of the diversity of life on Earth.

The initial stops for the traveling exhibition are

  • Reuben H. Fleet Science Center, San Diego, Sept. 24, 2014 – Jan. 4, 2015
  • The Tech Museum of Innovation, San Jose, California, Jan. 22 – April 27, 2015
  • St. Louis Science Center, May 15 – Sept. 10, 2015
  • Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland, Oct. 2, 2015 – Jan. 3, 2016
  • Discovery World, Milwaukee, Winter 2016
  • Exploration Place, Wichita, Kansas, Sept. 30, 2016 – Jan. 1, 2017
  • Peoria (Illinois) Riverfront Museum, Jan. 28 – May 29, 2017
  • Science North, Sudbury, Ontario, Sept. 30, 2017 – Jan. 1, 2018

The exhibition is accompanied by a website with educational resources that can be used to teach students about DNA, and educational videos for learners of all ages. Videos of many of the public educational programs, including lectures, symposia, discussion panels and informal gatherings, held in conjunction with the exhibition, are also available.

Designing Library Data Dashboards with Tableau Software

At this month’s Library Assessment Conference held in Seattle, one panel featured assessment librarians presenting data dashboards they created using Tableau software, Tableau Unleashed: Visualizing Library Data. This presentation includes views of dashboards from University of British Columbia Library (by presenter Jeremy Buhler), UMass Amherst Libraries (by Rachel Lewellen), and Ohio State Libraries (by Sarah Murphy). All of the presenters used Tableau software to produce their dashboards.

Tableau may be the most popular software for creating dashboards right now and the company offers a free version that has a great deal of functionality. In fact, at least one presenter (Sarah Murphy) included dashboards she created using Tableau Public. However, users must be cautioned that any data entered into Tableau Public become public information. That means anyone can see and download your raw data. So, if you use it, be sure all identifying information about individuals is stripped from your files and that you are comfortable with other people downloading your raw data. The presenters also mentioned tips for dashboard design. For additional design guidance, check out the freely downloadable resource A Guide to Creating Dashboards People Love to Use by Juice Analytics.

Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources from NLM

A new web page, Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources, is now available from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC). The resources on this page may be of value to international and local organizations and individuals providing Ebola outbreak-related services in West Africa, as well as friends and family of people in the affected region.

This resource complements NLM’s activation of the the Emergency Access Initiative in support of medical efforts in West Africa. The Emergency Access Initiative is a collaborative partnership between the National Library of Medicine and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text articles from over 650 biomedical serial titles and over 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. The free access period is August 12, 2014 – September 11, 2014. The news story, NLM Launches Emergency Access Initiative, Granting Free Access to Books and Journals for Healthcare Professionals Fighting Ebola Outbreak, provides more detail on the NLM response to the Ebola outbreak.

NLM Launches “Pictures of Nursing: The Zwerdling Postcard Collection”

Nurses from the George A. Brewster Nurse Training School pose for a group portrait, Jacksonville, FL, 1908The National Library of Medicine has launched a special display in the History of Medicine Division Reading Room and an online adaptation of Pictures of Nursing: The Zwerdling Postcard Collection. The NLM History of Medicine Division acquired an archive of 2,588 postcards from American nurse and collector Michael Zwerdling, RN. This unique archive consists of postcards with images of nurses and the nursing profession from around the world, produced between 1893 and 2011 with many examples coming from the “Golden Age” of postcards—roughly 1907 to 1920. Pictures of Nursing provides a way to understand the types of images that are represented in the full collection. The exhibit presents a selection of these historic postcards, spanning a century of nursing imagery. Nurses and nursing have been the frequent subjects of postcards. These images are informed by cultural values; ideas about women, men, and work; and by attitudes toward class, race, and national differences. By documenting the relationship of nursing to significant forces in 20th-century life, such as war and disease, these postcards reveal how nursing was seen during those times.

This unique exhibition will be open to the public in the History of Medicine Division Reading Room from September 2, 2014 to August 21, 2015, and will be available online. The exhibit curator is Julia Hallam, PhD, professor of communication and media at the University of Liverpool. The online exhibition incorporates a “Digital Gallery,” which includes a selection of 585 postcards from the Zwerdling collection not shown in the special display. The Digital Gallery also includes online activities, providing viewers new avenues to explore beyond the exhibition. Education resources are also featured in the online exhibition, including a lesson plan for grades 9-10 that investigates the exhibition content; a higher education module; an online activity, and a robust selection of resources including K-12 suggested readings. In addition, the Web feature, “Related Resources at NLM,” includes a selection of published articles on contemporary nursing issues available through PubMed Central, which provides free access to over 3.1 million full-text biomedical and life science journal articles.

MeSH on Demand Update: How to Find Citations Related to Your Text

Screenshot of the MeSH on Demand results pageIn May 2014, NLM introduced MeSH on Demand, a Web-based tool that suggests MeSH terms from your text such as an abstract or grant summary up to 10,000 characters using the MTI (Medical Text Indexer) software. For more background information, see the NLM Technical Bulletin, MeSH on Demand Tool: An Easy Way to Identify Relevant MeSH Terms.

The MeSH on Demand results page is now organized into three sections:

  • Section 1: Original input text (with the length of the input text)
  • Section 2: MeSH terms with links to the MeSH Browser
  • Section 3: Top ten PubMed/MEDLINE citations related to your text

The new MeSH on Demand feature displays the PubMed ID (PMID) for the top ten related citations in PubMed that were also used in computing the MeSH term recommendations. To access this new feature, start from the MeSH on Demand homepage, add your text, such as a project summary, into the box labeled “Text to be Processed.” Then, click the “Find MeSH Terms” button. MeSH on Demand lists the top ten related citation PMIDs from PubMed/MEDLINE. Each PMID is hyperlinked to that citation in PubMed. This new feature in MeSH on Demand is a result of user feedback received from our initial MeSH on Demand release. Users are encouraged to continue to send questions, suggestions, and comments to: NLMMESH-MOD@mail.nih.gov.

Logic Models for Library Assessment Planning

The Engaged Librarian: Crafting an Effective Assessment Plan to Determine the Impact of a Key Strategic Library Initiative, by Sarah Murphy at The Ohio State University (OSU), was presented during the 2014 Library Assessment Conference, held earlier this month in Seattle, WA. The presentation provided an overview to the use of a logic model as part of library strategic planning. The project incorporated the theory of change methodology with logic models and used the Kellogg Foundation Logic Model as a template. They storyboarded data within a data dashboard that was both aligned with and broken down by the applicable OSU strategic vision goals. Ms. Murphy reported that the benefits of using a logic model approach included having a flexible but structured way to do library assessment planning, having a collaborative and inclusive approach, creating a project focus, being able to assess linear and iterative programs and services, and the ability to communicate program accomplishments in interesting ways. During the question and answer session they noted they are also Tableau fans and like to create data structures in their dashboard to avoid information silos.

To learn more about logic models and data dashboards, check out the freely available NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) Evaluation Guides, especially Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Projects. Also available is a recording of the one-hour presentation Data Dashboards: Monitoring Progress toward Program Outcomes, part of the NN/LM PSR Midday at the Oasis webinar series.