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Registration Available for NTC Online Class “Discovering TOXNET” March 7 – April 6

Sign up now for the Spring session of Discovering Toxnet, a four-week online Moodle class conducted by the National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) March 7 through April 6. The course provides an introduction to TOXNET and other NLM environmental health databases through videos, guided tutorials, and discovery exercises. The purpose of this class is to enhance familiarity with reliable environmental health and toxicology information from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources. Skills and knowledge acquired from this course will enable attendees to access, utilize and refer others to online environmental and toxicology information.

Zika Virus Content Syndication

The National Library of Medicine Disaster Information Management Research Center has been updating the Zika Virus Health Information Resources incident topic page as new guidance documents and resources are published. Starting today, you can embed the National Library of Medicine Zika Virus page on your Web site by creating a free account on the HHS Content Syndication Storefront. Once you have an account, search for the NLM Zika page to access the code used to embed the webpage on your Web site. Each time we update our Web page, your page will also be updated.

NLM Receives Generous Gift from The DeBakey Medical Foundation

Donald A.B. Lindberg, National Library of Medicine Director from 1984 to 2015, and Michael DeBakey, celebrating DeBakey’s 90th birthday in the rotunda of the NLM Building, October 7, 1998.The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has received a generous gift from The DeBakey Medical Foundation to support development, expansion, and enhanced public access to the NLM’s collection of Michael E. DeBakey archives and associated collections, and to develop related programs in the history of medicine. Initial activities will include digitizing the bulk of the DeBakey archives and making them more readily available for study and analysis, as well as the establishment of Michael E. DeBakey Fellowships in the History of Medicine and a related lecture series.

Michael E. DeBakey, MD (1908–2008), was a legendary American surgeon, educator, and medical statesman. During a career spanning 85 years, his work transformed cardiovascular surgery, helped to develop the Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH), raised medical education standards, and informed national health care policy. He pioneered many operative procedures, including aneurysm repair, coronary bypass, endarterectomy, which routinely save thousands of lives each year. He performed the first successful implantation of a left ventricular assist device and some of the first heart transplants. His inventions included the roller pump (a key component of heart-lung machines), as a medical student, as well as artificial hearts and ventricular assist pumps. Among innumerable other contributions, Dr. DeBakey was a visionary supporter of the NLM, playing a pivotal role in its transformation from the Armed Forces Medical Library in the 1950s, in the establishment of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine in the 1960s, in launching NLM’s outreach initiatives in the 1990s, and in promoting the digitization of its indexes to pre-1960s journal articles. A video profile of Dr. DeBakey is available on the NLM Web site.

The NLM’s collection of Michael E. DeBakey archives dates from the early 1900s to 2009. Containing correspondence, administrative records, diaries, transcripts, publications, speeches, conference and awards material, subject files, photographs, and audiovisual media, the collection reflects the vast expanse of Dr. DeBakey’s life, achievements, and interests as a world-renowned medical statesman, innovator, and champion of humanitarianism and lifelong learning. NLM has already digitized selected items from the DeBakey archives for the Michael E. DeBakey Profiles in Science site. Materials in the DeBakey archives have rich connections to the archives of other individuals and organizations, including NLM’s own archives, as well as to many published works in the NLM collection.

Details of the expanded access to the Michael. E. DeBakey archives held by the Library, as well as the Michael E. DeBakey Fellowships in the History of Medicine and an associated annual Michael. E. DeBakey Lecture in the History of Medicine, will be announced later this year.

NLM Catalog Display Change: Journal Display Removed

At the end of December 2010, NLM launched a redesigned NLM Catalog with a new display format called Journal, available for journals cited in Entrez databases. In December 2015, NLM removed Journal as a display option. Statistics have shown that the Journal display option was seldom used. All of the elements previously in the Journal display are available in the Full display.

Forum on March 7: Using Data to Improve Clinical Patient Outcomes

On March 7 the NN/LM Pacific Northwest (PNR) and MidContinental (MCR) Regions are co-sponsoring a forum that will provide an overview of current and potential uses of patient data to improve patient safety, quality of care and evidence-based practice, Using Data to Improve Clinical Patient Outcomes. The event will be live streamed, linking presenters and participants in videoconference studios located at the University of Washington in Seattle and University of Utah in Salt Lake City. Librarian participants will have the opportunity to explore how they can contribute to the use of clinical data as evidence and what skills they can develop to support health care organizations in the use of data. Online or in-person attendance options are available. Registration is free, but required. The session will be archived, and a captioned recording will be made available within a few weeks of the event.

In preparation for this forum, both Regions are offering Data Curation / Management Journal Clubs, using both the MLA’s Discussion Group Program structure along with the new PubMed Commons Journal Clubs (PCJC) structure. Look forward to their analysis of recent data curation/management articles in the Plains to Peaks and Dragonfly newsletters!

Upcoming NCBI Webinars: Sequence Read Archive (SRA) and Resources for Cancer Research

Five ways to submit next-gen sequence data to NCBI’s Sequence Read Archive (SRA)
Wed, February 17, 2016, 10:00-11:00 am PT
In this webinar you will learn how to use five different ways to submit your next gen sequence data to NCBI’s Sequence Read Archive. These include external submission services through Illumina’s BaseSpace, MOTHUR (for microbial ecology data) and the iPlant Collaborative. In addition NCBI provides the new SRA submission portal and soon will offer the ability to upload data to SRA through FTP and the Aspera command line client in the new submission portal.

NCBI resources for cancer research
Wed, March 2, 2016, 10:00-11:00 am PT
This workshop provides an overview of NCBI molecular resources for cancer researchers. In the first part of the webinar you will learn to more effectively use the Entrez text-based search system and the BLAST sequence similarity search tool to find data relevant to cancer research including sequence, variation, gene and expression information. The second part of the presentation will focus on accessing large-scale genomics datasets. You will learn how to search for, access and download DNA-seq, RNA-seq, Epigenomics and Metagenomics datasets and how to access the tools and APIs at NCBI that can be used to extract relevant subsets of that data for cancer research.

Rural Funding Opportunity: USDA Distance Learning & Telemedicine Grants

The United States Department of Agriculture’s Rural Utilities Service is soliciting applications for its Distance Learning and Telemedicine Grant Program, which helps rural communities use the unique capabilities of telecommunications to connect to each other and to the world, overcoming the effects of remoteness and low population density. For example, this program can link teachers and medical service providers in one area to students and patients in another. Eligible applicants include most entities that provide education or health care through telecommunications, including: most State and local governmental entities, Federally-recognized Tribes, non-profits, for-profit businesses, and consortia of eligible entities. The application deadline is March 14, 2016. For more information, visit the USDA website.

Insular Areas Funding Opportunity: OIA Technical Assistance Program

The Office of Insular Affairs (OIA) is requesting funding proposals for its Technical Assistance Program (TAP) (Funding Opportunity Number: TAP-2016), which provides grant funding for short-term projects intended to meet the immediate needs of Guam, American Samoa, the US Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Freely Associated States of the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau; and any non-profit institutions/organizations whose missions directly benefit the seven insular areas. Funding priorities include, but are not limited to, projects that foster the development of the insular areas in the following categories: Accountability, financial management, economic development, education, energy, management control initiatives, disaster assistance, natural and cultural resources, climate change, capacity building, health initiatives, and outdoor youth initiatives. The application deadline is March 1, 2016. For more information, visit Grants.gov.

National Library of Medicine Announces MedPix®, Free Online Medical Image Database

MedPix Home Page – NLM’s Medical Image DatabaseThe National Library of Medicine has announced the launch of MedPix®, a free online medical image database originally developed by the Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Informatics at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, MD. The MedPix collection categorizes and classifies the image and patient data for each of several subsets of image database applications (e.g. radiology, pathology, ophthalmology, etc.). The content material is both high-quality and high-yield and includes both common and rare conditions. Most cases have a proven diagnosis (pathology, clinical follow-up). The teaching file cases are peer-reviewed by an Editorial Panel. The primary target audience includes resident and practicing physicians, medical students, nurses and graduate nursing students and other post-graduate trainees. The material is organized by disease category, disease location (organ system), and by patient profiles.

The foundation for MedPix was a radiology study tool that was originally developed by Dr. J.G. Smirniotopoulos in 1984. In the early 1990s, as radiology was moving from film to digital imaging, there was simultaneously a merger of the diagnostic imaging residency programs of the two premier military hospitals: Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the National Naval Medical Center. In the summer of 1999, a Web-based digital teaching file based on the radiology study tool was built at USUHS to allow the two military training programs to share teaching file cases, a training requirement. Soon, other military hospitals and several civilian institutions joined MedPix. Over the past 16 years, MedPix has amassed an impressive collection of over 53,000 images from over 13,000 cases. Continuing Medical Education (CME) and Nurse Education (CNE) were added to the MedPix system in 2001.

As a public education service, the NLM and MedPix provide the storage service, indexing, and Web server hosting. Individuals as well as institutions may participate. Contributed content may be copyrighted by the original author/contributor. No additional software is required; an Internet browser is all you need!

NIH Content Syndication in Action!

Screencapture of the NIH News in Health diabetes content displayed on the Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library website.Over the last few months, we have announced the new content syndication feature for both NIHSeniorHealth and NIH News in Health. The HHS Syndication Storefront allows you to syndicate (import) content from many HHS websites directly into your own website or application, free of charge. Digital Gov’s recent article, Does Content Syndication Work?, provides some examples of NIH News in Health’s content syndication in action on a public library and a resource center’s website! Using HHS web content saves you time and money; you don’t need to write your own health content or worry about updating web pages. Browse and choose from topics in the catalog and then simply add the related code to your web page. The end result: HHS content will populate on your web page with your website’s existing look and feel!

To learn more about implementing this feature on your website, visit Free Web Content from NIH and the HHS Syndication Storefront.