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PNR Rendezvous – June 18 Developing Data Services: a tale from two Oregon universities

Developing Data Services: a tale from two Oregon universities presented by Amanda L. Whitmire, Ph.D.,
Assistant Professor and Data Management Specialist at Oregon State University and Melissa Haendel, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Lead Ontologist at Oregon Health & Science University

June 18, 2014 at 1 PM Pacific (noon Alaska 2 PM Mountain)

While the generation or collection of large, complex research datasets is becoming easier and less expensive all the time, researchers often lack the knowledge and skills that are necessary to properly manage them. Having these skills is paramount in ensuring data quality, integrity, discoverability, integration, reproducibility, and reuse over time. Librarians have been preserving, managing and disseminating information for thousands of years. As scholarly research is increasingly carried out digitally, and products of research have expanded from primarily text-based manuscripts to include datasets, metadata, maps, software code etc., it is a natural expansion of scope for libraries to be involved in the stewardship of these materials as well. This kind of evolution requires that libraries bring in faculty with new skills and collaborate more intimately with researchers during the research data lifecycle, and this is exactly what is happening in academic libraries across the country.

In this webinar, two researchers-turned-data-specialists, both based in academic libraries, will share their experiences and perspectives on the development of research data services at their respective institutions. Each will share their perspective on the important role that libraries can play in helping researchers manage, preserve, and share their data.

To attend go to http://webmeeting.nih.gov/rendezvous and login as a Guest, using your own name.  Once logged into the web meeting, a pop-up box allows you to put in your phone number and the program will call you. If this does not happen, just call the 800 number and use the participant code that appears in the Notes box on the screen.

If you are unable to tune in live, we invite you to view a recording of the webcast, posted to the Rendezvous website later.

As part of our Federal agency services regarding electronic and information technology resources being accessible to people with disabilities, closed captioning is available on this and future PNR Rendezvous webcasts.

MeSH On Demand

MeSH on Demand is a new tool announced in this month’s NLM Technical Bulletin and is available online for use: http://ii.nlm.nih.gov/Interactive/MeSHonDemand.shtml. This is one of the Natural Language Processing tools being developed in the Cognitive Science Branch of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, a division of the NLM. The on Demand tool analyzes chunks of text (up to 10000 characters) and identifies potentially related MeSH terms. From the MeSH on Demand page a user simply pastes in a piece of text, hits the “Find MeSH Terms” button, and a new page will be generated with suggested MeSH terms listed below the inputted text. According to the Technical Bulletin article, the tool will find “MeSH Headings, Publication Types, and Supplementary Concepts, but not Qualifiers (Subheadings).”

A disclaimer appears on the tool’s page that the results are generated via an automated, machine logic driven system which is meant to emulate human indexer thought. One can deduce from the disclaimer that we shouldn’t expect the underlying algorithms to understand all of the same textual nuances that a seasoned indexer would and it notes that “results will undoubtedly differ from any human-generated indexing.” This got me wondering though about how much the tool’s generated terms would differ from human-generated ones. To evaluate, I pasted in an abstract from an article on Computerized Provider Order Entry systems causing medication errors.  This was by no means meant as a methodical and thorough evaluation of MeSH on Demand.  Rather, this was simply meant to address personal curiosity and this particular article was selected using a “convenience sampling” technique (it was already open in a different tab).  This article had previously been indexed for MEDLINE with the following MeSH terms: Read more »

Free Webinar: Health Happens in Libraries: Technology Planning for eHealth

Emily Hurst from NN/LM SCR, Vanessa Mason, and McCrae Parker will present in this Health Happens in Libraries webinar from OCLC tomorrow, May 28th at 2:00pm Eastern / 11:00am Pacific.

As the intersection of digital technology and individual health management grows, patrons will turn to libraries to access digital resources and learn how to put technology to work for their health. A recent IMLS study showed that an estimated 37 percent of library computer users (28 million people) explore health and wellness issues, including learning about medical conditions, finding health care providers, and assessing health insurance options. Join the Health Happens in Libraries team to learn how public libraries can leverage their technology infrastructure to better serve the health information needs of patrons. Participants will learn best practices and resources for eHealth technology planning for libraries of all sizes. Participants will also be introduced to strategies for communicating with community partners about their technology resources, and identifying ways to build eHealth services through collaboration.

Register here: http://webjunction.org/events/webjunction/technology-planning-for-ehealth.html

National Network Of Libraries Of Medicine RFI

The National Library of Medicine has developed a Request for Information (RFI) to offer health sciences and public libraries, health professionals, public health workers, community organizations, the general public, and other interested individuals and entities the opportunity to recommend effective approaches to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (http://nnlm.gov).

NLM will use the information submitted in response to this RFI for planning purposes and is not obligated to comment or respond to any responder’s submission. However, responses to the RFI may be reflected in futures solicitations. The information provided will be analyzed and may appear in reports.

Comments will be collected until the closing date of June 26 at  3pm (ET).

 

 

Voyaging to the Future with NLM

NLM has put together a symposium entitled “Voyaging to the Future” reflecting on the past 30 years at NLM and looking towards its future.  This all day event addresses important topics such as training future leaders, providing access to literature and reaching the undeserved.  The full program is available at http://nlmvoyagingtothefuture.org/present/.  The event will be streamed live on May 14 from 8:30AM – 5:00PM EST and a captioned recording will be made available online after. Tania Bardyn, in her role as Director of NN/LM PNR, the OERC and Web-STOC will be in attendance.  Read more »

EHR usage update

We are now three years into the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare’s Meaningful Use EHR adoption incentive program. According to CMS’s website, as of March of this year, $14.8 billion in payments have been made to the over 470,000 providers and hospitals participating in the program. Those are some big numbers! But what about the people who are using the systems? Can we tell whether or not any of this is making a difference in quality of care? What about health care provider workflow or job satisfaction? Read more »