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Webinar: Storytelling 101: Evolving Your Story and the Way You Tell It

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Aligning Forces for Quality (AF4Q) National Meeting included this session that will be offered as a webinar on July 30, 2014 at 1pm Eastern.  Attendees will get an overview of the process and tips for developing and delivering a story in the most effective and powerful way possible – to support their community, their mission, and their goals.  Participants will learn from examples of consumers who have successfully applied the core storytelling elements to their work.  Featured spacers are AF4Q consumers Vazaskia Caldwell, Kathy Day, Alicia Staley, Patty Black, along with Dr. Josh Cutler.

July 30, 2014, 1pm – 2:30pm Eastern

All are welcome!  For log-in information visit the AF4Q site: http://forces4quality.org/dashboard/events/show/448

The Washington Health Alliance, a NN/LM PNR member is an Aligning Forces for Quality community: http://wahealthalliance.org

Spring Award Recipients

In addition to recently announced recipients for Medical Library Pilot Projects, and Express Outreach Awards, the NN/LM PNR congratulates other Spring 2014 award recipients in these award categories, as follows.

Two network member organizations received Health Disparities Information Outreach awards aimed at increasing awareness of health disparities and the National Library of Medicine’s resources.

Project Title: Somali Cultural Profile Health Disparities Information Project
Project Manager: Christine Wilson Owens, EthnoMed Program Supervisor, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA
Summary: Update and enhance the Somali Cultural Profile and create a new Somali Community Resources page on the Ethnomed website to keep the already widely used resource relevant to the current cultural and health experience of Somali immigrants in Seattle (and beyond), with the aim of reducing health disparities.

Project Title: Increasing Health Disparity and Resource Awareness at Tuality Healthcare utilizing Teatro Milagro (a theatre presentation) as a medium for change
Project Manager: Judith Hayes, Library Services Manager, Tuality Healthcare, Hillsboro, OR
Summary: Collaborate with Teatro Milagro in bringing a unique theater-based interactive presentation to create dialog and foster self-reflection in the areas of cultural diversity and health disparities. The goals of the project are to: Increase awareness of health disparities in Western Washington County (Tuality Healthcare’s service area); increase awareness of available resources to help address health and cultural disparity issues at Tuality Healthcare; and to improve the level of understanding between staff and clients of different cultural backgrounds.

Two network member organizations received Health Information Services awards to promote the value of health information services.

Project Title: FD CARES Community Education Outreach
Project Manager: Laura Morris, City of Tacoma, Fire Department, Tacoma, WA
Summary: To create supplemental materials to enhance current chronic illness education program for residents and staff at local Tacoma care facilities.

Project Title: Building a Healthier Community in Western Washington County through improving knowledge of health resources
Project Manager: Judith Hayes, Library Services Manager, Tuality Health Information Resource Center, Hillsboro, OR
Summary: Tuality Health Information Resource Center and the Tuality Community Education Department will increase the visibility of both departments in the community by providing reliable health information at local health fairs and community events, and working with local school health teachers and parish nurses.

Last, but not least, one Technology Improvement Award was made:

Project Title: Kalispell Regional Hospital Patient Portal Education Access
Project Manager: Heidi Sue Adams, Lead Medical Librarian, Kalispell Regional Medical Center Library, Kalispell, MT
Summary: To provide access points (in-hospital computers and mobile devices) to patients at KRH—including patient discharge instructions, educational information, health summary information, and translation services. Training will be provided to staff and patients on how to use these new services.

Please note: The above projects were proposed during Spring 2014, and funding was awarded in April. Coming soon will be our announcement of a *new* round of funding opportunities, so stay tuned!

Medical Library Pilot Project Award Recipients

The NN/LM PNR congratulates the following Spring 2014 Medical Library Pilot Project award recipients, funded up to $15,000 for projects that explore or demonstrate innovation or emerging roles of the library:

Project Title: Neighborhood Health Link: Promoting Access to Healthy Community Resources
Project Manager: Carol Cahill, Research Associate, Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA
Summary: Increase content and geographic scope of Group Health’s website “Neighborhood Health Link” which links primary care patients to health-promoting community resources in King County. Evaluate website’s utility to clinical staff/patients/community at large.

Project Title: Clinical and Translational Activities Reporting Tool (CTAR)
Project Manager: Robin Champieux, Scholarly Communication Librarian, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
Summary: To build a research activity profiling tool that will synthesize and analyze data across a disparate set of internal and external data sources (e.g. IRB, grants and contracts, PubMed) to identify research activity topics and trends, and their classification as clinical or translational. OHSU’s Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute will use CTAR to increase its ability to strategically contribute to research outcomes and human health.

Project Title: RELM: Research and Evidence Literacy in Medicine CME Game for Physicians
Project Manager: Ann Gleason, Associate Director for Resources and Systems, UW Health Sciences Library, Seattle, WA
Summary: In phase 3 of a multi-part project, create a game that teaches physicians how to practice evidence-based medicine, especially geared towards physicians practicing in rural areas who have not been taught EBM and have not used electronic library resources in the last decade.

Library Student Scholarship Awards

The NN/LM PNR is pleased to announce the Library Student Scholarship Awards for students interested in attending an upcoming health science libraries meeting. The award covers expenses for students to attend meetings sponsored by state or regional health science library associations in the Pacific Northwest Region. Upcoming eligible meetings include the Oregon Health Science Libraries Association (OHSLA), the Washington Medical Librarians Association (WMLA), or the “Quint” meeting involving five chapters of the Medical Library Association.

Applying is easy but the deadlines for OHSLA and WMLA are coming up very soon, so please spread the word to library students you know!

TOXNET Gets A Facelift

The National Library of Medicine’s TOXNET (TOXicology Data NETwork) resource – http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov - is a group of databases covering chemicals and drugs, diseases and the environment, environmental health, occupational safety and health, poisoning, risk assessment and regulations, and toxicology.  Recently the TOXNET interface was updated and features:

  • Improved appearance
  • Intuitive interactive capabilities
  • Improved multi-database search
  • Easy selection of item to save in “My List”
  • More accessible menus and pull-downs
  • Type-ahead Browse
  • Hover-over Help

Read more »

Guest post: Capturing Content for Distance Learning

This is a guest post written by Jon Anscher on behalf of the Northwest Regional Primary Care Association.  The NWRPCA received a Technology Improvement Award from the NN/LM PNR to purchase equipment for capturing sessions at the organization’s two annual conferences.

Community Health Centers (CHCs) need a comprehensive learning environment with modularized learning components that are current, interactive, and engaging and our goal was to deliver a higher quality and broader access through online resources. In an age where technology is changing too fast for our infrastructure to keep up, it is essential that CHC workers have access to the latest information without having to attend every retreat, workshop, or training that is offered.

Add to that a challenging economy, and distance learning becomes the saving grace of a new age. Through distance learning, we can offer training and information that is instantly accessible, easy to update, and is less than half the cost to clinics that cannot afford continually sending their staff to conferences and courses to stay current. Further, distance learning has the capacity to target specific learning and identify the needs of the learners so that participants can maximize their time, learning content that is the most relevant to them.

The Challenge

The staff at Northwest Regional Primary Care Association (NWRPCA) regularly received feedback from conference participants that there was so much good content, they wished they could go to more than one session. Given this consistent need, the Education and Training Team wanted to extend the visibility and accessibility of our conferences through better capture and delivery of content. Secondarily we also wanted to deliver higher quality online learning by doing better work capturing and delivering content.

Thanks to an award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region, we were able to do just that. The resulting content captured from purchased equipment has allowed us to extend the reach of our conferences and the valuable learning that can be found there.

Learning from Our Ignorance

Yet this journey was not without challenges. As a small nonprofit, NWRPCA is constantly struggling to keep up with current trends in technology and content delivery. Maintaining the equipment and a skilled staff is no easy task. And the time and effort that goes into editing the hours of footage captured cannot be overestimated. Video editing is a time consuming process that is often not user friendly. As such, it has become apparent that there is a fine balance between quality and speed of delivery. Finding that balance is a challenge and one that we continue to address.

The biggest surprise, however, was the complexity of the capture process. Entering into this, we thought that resources were our big deficiency, but we quickly realized that equipment was a drop in the bucket compared to the time it took to develop and edit the content we captured and the skills it took to ensure we could capture and work with the content. We quickly found that building partnerships and finding ways to develop solid workflow was key.

Additionally, the number of times that captures were lost due to clipped audio, crashed software, or user error was surprising. Anyone considering capturing content from a conference should have a clear purpose for why they are doing it, a measured need, and a clear goal about how they are going to manage all that content.

Not only was the human factor big, but the size of the captured content quickly became an issue. As the size of content grew, we quickly realized we needed a strong plan for how to keep the content safe. We had anticipated a large working drive to keep the content on, but the need for redundant backup drives quickly out-paced us.

Lastly, it is very important that you understand the cost to value ratio. How much of a commitment of staff and resources is the content worth? At first, we tried to capture content at the highest quality. But we quickly discovered that space was not unlimited and had to make decisions about the level of quality that we truly needed.

Success

Overall, this project has been a big success. We engaged a broader audience and learned a lot about balancing quality and quantity. Many conference attendees were eager to gain access to the recordings for sessions they missed and sessions they wanted to share with others. Ultimately, this was our sign of success.