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Webinar: Technology Planning Tips for Small Libraries

The Association for Rural & Small Libraries (ARSL) announces…
Please join us for this free webinar, geared specifically to the needs of small libraries (and featuring one of our ARSL board members, Julie Elmore!):

Technology Planning Tips for Small Libraries
Wednesday, August 19, 11:00am-12:00pm PDT

Registration Link: https://cc.readytalk.com/r/w6a703s7m0fm&eomv
How do you maximize your technology resources? When should you replace computers? How do you manage software updates? Do you have enough bandwidth to support patron Internet use? Technology decisions can be difficult to make, but a technology plan can help you focus your efforts.

Join us for this free webinar to learn from small libraries that have used technology planning to make better decisions, be more prepared, and improve services to their communities. Even with limited time and resources, a technology plan can help your library stay up-to-date. We will share tips and tactics to help you create a plan for your library’s technology. Read more »

Save the Dates: 2015-2016 “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” course from NLM

Are you a health science librarian in the United States who offers (or wants to offer) bioinformatics services at your institution? The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and the NLM Training Center will be offering “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” course in 2015-2016. Participants who complete the class will be eligible for Medical Library Association Continuing Education credits. The course is free, but travel, lodging and related costs are at the expense of the participant.

There are two parts to the course, and applicants must take both parts:

  • Part 1: “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching” is a six-week, online (asynchronous) pre-course. Successful completion of this pre-course is required to continue to Part 2.
  • Part 2: A five-day in-person course offered on-site at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland.

Read more »

New PNR Moodle Class – Health Issues in the Headlines: Learning to Read Between the Lines

cooking-chocolate-674508_640Dark chocolate, red wine, and stem cells – what do these have in common?  All have been reported in the news as having health benefits.  Often the first place your patrons will hear about health issues is in the media.  This interactive, hands-on CE course will introduce participants to the environment of health reporting.  Participants will learn about how health is reported in the news as well as how to evaluate the accuracy and validity of science and health stories.  The impact of celebrity illness will also be discussed.  By the end of this course, participants will be better equipped to help their patrons look more critically at health issues that are being reported in the news media.  Actual news articles and research reports will be included for critique. Read more »

Upcoming WebJunction webinar for public libraries regarding advocacy tools

WebJunction is offering a free webinar August 13 from 11:00am – 12:30pm Pacific Time (10:00am -11:30am Alaska, Noon-1:30 Mountain).

This webinar will feature several library leaders who will speak about what they have done using advocacy materials to increase awareness of the library and to engage more with their communities.  The freely available resources featured include an updated Turning the Page and a new online guide that was modeled after Geek the Library.  The webinar is a great opportunity to learn more about how to start your own library advocacy campaign and become an even greater asset to your community.

To learn more about the webinar and to register got to http://www.webjunction.org/events/webjunction/because-advocacy-never-stops.html

Upcoming PNR Partners webinar

This Thursday, July 16 at 1pm Pacific Time (noon Alaska, 2pm Mountain), please join us in our new webinar series, PNR Partners.  This hour long program will be focused on those in our region who have received funding from the PNR and have developed services or programs to better serve those in their communities.  At this first session we will hear about two programs both located in Alaska.  We will hear from Jeni Rogers who will speak about The Anchorage Health Literacy Collaborative (TAHLC) which promotes health literacy to limited English proficient students at the Alaska Literacy Program (ALP) and to immigrant and refugee communities throughout Anchorage, Alaska.  In 2008, TAHLC developed a Peer Language Navigator (PLN) program around breast and cervical cancer workshops and screenings by training bilingual participants on health information to share with their community members.  In 2013 and 2014, the PLN model was expanded through two NN/LM Pacific Northwest Region express outreach awards where PLNs were trained to find reliable online health resources and to share health information with community members.  The project was highly successful: all PLNs reported increased confidence accessing health information online and reached out to over 200 individuals in the community.  As a result of this project, TAHLC continues to offer education on online health information through health literacy courses and community health outreach projects.

Linda Shepard’s project, Outreach to and Through Faith Communities, was designed to build on the experience and collaborative relationships of the Alaska Faith Community Nurse Resource Center at Providence.  The goal of the project was to provide outreach education and improve health literacy in the Anchorage community.  A cadre of volunteer Faith Community Nurses (FCNs) were recruited and trained to become community experts in accessing and utilizing National Library of Medicine (NLM) resources such as MedlinePlus, PubMed and Arctic Health.  These trained volunteers were provided with an outreach toolkit, a mobile internet classroom and ongoing technical assistance which equipped them with resources to provide community outreach presentations.  This combination of volunteer community experts and a mobile internet classroom provided community members at risk for low health literacy to have increased options and access to quality health information they could use to research and make good decisions about their health concerns. Read more »

Next week’s PNR Rendezvous: Lessons Learned from a 3D Printing Pilot in a Health Sciences Library

3D printing has done some pretty amazing things such as create bone replacements and skull implants.  However, most 3D printers in libraries do not make items quite of this caliber but it is still no less amazing.  Just think about what computers and the Internet and cell phones were like a few years ago and where they are now.  3D printing is much the same.  Just a few short years ago most people couldn’t imagine having one at their public or academic library and now many institutions offer this service in some form or other.  It’s not unusual to find a 3D printer and other tools in makerspaces and hackerspaces which offer an opportunity for people to gather and create.  Why have a 3D printer service?  Considering offering a 3D printer service?  Have you already joined the world of 3D printing?  Join us next Wednesday, July 15 at 1:00pm Pacific Time (noon Alaska 2 PM Mountain) to hear about the 3D printing pilot project undertaken by the University of Washington Health Sciences Library.  Terry Ann Jankowski, Assistant Director of User Experience and Paul Ludecke, Computer Commons Manager, describe what they did, what they learned, what they would do differently and what they hope to do in the future. Read more »