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FAQ

What is a blog?

A blog (web+log) is a type of online journal or newsletter. Blogs are structured in reverse chronological order, so the most recently published stories appear at the top of the web page.

Blogs have several advantages over traditional web pages as tools for communicating news. Blogging software (we use WordPress) makes it easy to update blog pages right from the web with only a minimum of technical skill required. The blog format also allows readers to publicly comment on stories they find interesting, thus contributing to the blog’s overall value. Finally, blogs give readers the option to use RSS technology to subscribe to a blog in much the same way as they would subscribe to a print magazine or a listserv.

For more about blogs, see:

http://sns.mlanet.org/blog/blog_about.php

What is RSS?

RSS (really simple syndication) makes blog content portable. Are you tired of checking your favorite blogs one by one, to see if there are updates? RSS is the tool for you. This video by Common Craft, Inc. gives a quick and entertaining introduction to RSS.

To get started with RSS, you will need to sign up for an account to an RSS Reader. Google Reader and Bloglines are two free, popular, web-based RSS Readers. Once you have established an account, look for the orange RSS symbol or simply a link to “RSS” on your favorite web pages. Click on that symbol or link. You will be guided through the process of subscribing for that page’s RSS feed.

For more about RSS, see:

http://sns.mlanet.org/blog/blog_rss.php

How did Dragonfly get its name?

In Native American folklore, the dragonfly is the messenger. Our Dragonfly carries information to network members and friends in the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

Our logo was painted by Chholing Taha, a librarian who was on the NN/LM PNR staff.

She describes the dragonfly logo as follows:

“The Native use of the beautiful dragonfly can be found in a variety of Tribal art forms across the country. The ovoid design was selected to honor the coastal people. Look to the east, there live the people of the corn who cultivated the land and where the sun rises each morning. To the west live the people of the sea who sustained themselves with gifts of the ocean and where the sun rests each evening. The circle holding these traditions symbolizes the oneness of all peoples and the dragonfly carries the message of peace and inspiration from the spirit realms.”