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Archive for the ‘News From NN/LM PNR’ Category

Guest post: Capturing Content for Distance Learning

Friday, June 13th, 2014

This is a guest post written by Jon Anscher on behalf of the Northwest Regional Primary Care Association.  The NWRPCA received a Technology Improvement Award from the NN/LM PNR to purchase equipment for capturing sessions at the organization’s two annual conferences.

Community Health Centers (CHCs) need a comprehensive learning environment with modularized learning components that are current, interactive, and engaging and our goal was to deliver a higher quality and broader access through online resources. In an age where technology is changing too fast for our infrastructure to keep up, it is essential that CHC workers have access to the latest information without having to attend every retreat, workshop, or training that is offered.

Add to that a challenging economy, and distance learning becomes the saving grace of a new age. Through distance learning, we can offer training and information that is instantly accessible, easy to update, and is less than half the cost to clinics that cannot afford continually sending their staff to conferences and courses to stay current. Further, distance learning has the capacity to target specific learning and identify the needs of the learners so that participants can maximize their time, learning content that is the most relevant to them.

The Challenge

The staff at Northwest Regional Primary Care Association (NWRPCA) regularly received feedback from conference participants that there was so much good content, they wished they could go to more than one session. Given this consistent need, the Education and Training Team wanted to extend the visibility and accessibility of our conferences through better capture and delivery of content. Secondarily we also wanted to deliver higher quality online learning by doing better work capturing and delivering content.

Thanks to an award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region, we were able to do just that. The resulting content captured from purchased equipment has allowed us to extend the reach of our conferences and the valuable learning that can be found there.

Learning from Our Ignorance

Yet this journey was not without challenges. As a small nonprofit, NWRPCA is constantly struggling to keep up with current trends in technology and content delivery. Maintaining the equipment and a skilled staff is no easy task. And the time and effort that goes into editing the hours of footage captured cannot be overestimated. Video editing is a time consuming process that is often not user friendly. As such, it has become apparent that there is a fine balance between quality and speed of delivery. Finding that balance is a challenge and one that we continue to address.

The biggest surprise, however, was the complexity of the capture process. Entering into this, we thought that resources were our big deficiency, but we quickly realized that equipment was a drop in the bucket compared to the time it took to develop and edit the content we captured and the skills it took to ensure we could capture and work with the content. We quickly found that building partnerships and finding ways to develop solid workflow was key.

Additionally, the number of times that captures were lost due to clipped audio, crashed software, or user error was surprising. Anyone considering capturing content from a conference should have a clear purpose for why they are doing it, a measured need, and a clear goal about how they are going to manage all that content.

Not only was the human factor big, but the size of the captured content quickly became an issue. As the size of content grew, we quickly realized we needed a strong plan for how to keep the content safe. We had anticipated a large working drive to keep the content on, but the need for redundant backup drives quickly out-paced us.

Lastly, it is very important that you understand the cost to value ratio. How much of a commitment of staff and resources is the content worth? At first, we tried to capture content at the highest quality. But we quickly discovered that space was not unlimited and had to make decisions about the level of quality that we truly needed.

Success

Overall, this project has been a big success. We engaged a broader audience and learned a lot about balancing quality and quantity. Many conference attendees were eager to gain access to the recordings for sessions they missed and sessions they wanted to share with others. Ultimately, this was our sign of success.

Express Outreach Award Recipients

Friday, June 13th, 2014

The NN/LM PNR congratulates the following Spring 2014 Express Outreach award recipients, funded up to $15,000 to improve use of quality online health information resources by priority populations and to promote awareness and use of the products and services of the NLM and the NN/LM:

Project Title: Alaska Health Education Library Project (AHELP)
Project Manager: Jayne Andreen, Alaska Division of Public Health, Juneau, AK
Summary: Increase Alaska’s prevention and health promotion capacity for evidence- and outcome-based programming and evaluation by increasing the prevention and promotion workforce’s awareness and utilization of NLM resources” through conferences and live and web-based trainings.

Project Title: Equipping Peer Language Navigators for Outreach in Anchorage, Alaska Communities
Project Manager: Polly Smith, The Anchorage Health Literacy Collaborative, Anchorage, AK
Summary: Train Peer Language Navigators to utilize NLM resources such as PubMed, Medline and Arctic health to identify relevant, credible health information to share with community members to promote health.

Project Title: Outreach Training Program on Evidence-based Management for Healthcare Administrators in Idaho
Project Manager: Ruiling Guo, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID
Summary: Provide a face-to-face training program on evidence-based management to the underserved hospital administrators in rural Idaho.

Project Title: Environmental Health Connection for Rural Oregon Schools
Project Manager: Shelley Dougherty, Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital, Lincoln City, OR
Summary: Build on the education program by providing twelve one hour classes to four schools and two tribal education programs in northwest rural Oregon using the ToxTown curriculum

UW iSchool Directed Field Work Experience

Friday, March 14th, 2014

Guest post by Stephanie Hanson, UW iSchool Directed Field work student.

HansonI just completed a Directed Field Work assignment with the gracious staff of the NN/LM PNR at the University of Washington Health Sciences library. The UW iSchool Directed Field Work program offers MLIS students the chance to participate in experiential learning opportunities with different libraries and employers for credit towards the graduate degree.

While at the NN/LM PNR, I had the chance to attend Morning Report sessions to observe the resident learning process, work at the Health Sciences Library Information Desk, create a LibGuide, learn about the Moodle online class creation process, research NLM funding for MLA projects, and learn about outreach project funding, as well as interview librarians about their work.

I currently work in a hospital medical library and this was really a great chance to expand my knowledge of the many resources that the National Library of Medicine offers to library members and the public. I’d like to thank all the staff at the NN/LM PNR and the HSL for making me feel welcome and sharing their expertise with me.Stephanie Hanson, email: sbh22@uw.edu.

RML Rendezvous March 12 – Journal Pricing, Libraries and (Open) Access

Thursday, March 6th, 2014
Journal Pricing, Libraries and (Open) Access presented by Tim Jewell, Director of Information Resources and Scholarly Communication at the University of Washington Libraries

March 12, 2013 at 1 PM Pacific (noon Alaska 2 PM Mountain)

Twenty five years ago the Association of Research Libraries began calling attention to the “serials crisis” – an alarming upward pricing trend that has continued through the large-scale, revolutionary introduction of electronic journals in the 1990’s and subsequent development of “big deal” journal bundling practices by a small number of dominant commercial publishing companies. This presentation will provide an overview of journal pricing economics and trends, introduce the Open Access paradigm as an alternative to high journal prices and bundling, and explore current Open Access developments.

To attend go to http://webmeeting.nih.gov/rendezvous and login as a Guest, using your own name.  Once logged into the web meeting, a pop-up box allows you to put in your phone number and the program will call you. If this does not happen, just call the 800 number and use the participant code given in the Notes box on the screen.

If you are unable to tune in live, we invite you to view a recording of the webcast, posted to the Rendezvous website later.

As part of our Federal agency services regarding electronic and information technology resources being accessible to people with disabilities, closed captioning is available on this and future RML Rendezvous webcasts.

NN/LM Workshop for Washington Community Colleges

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

On Friday, March 28, 2014 the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific NW Region, will sponsor a free half-day of training (9 AM to 1 PM) about National Library of Medicine resources and databases for library staff from community colleges in Washington State. The training is designed to highlight ways to serve allied health professional, nursing, and other health sciences students and faculty.

The training will take place on the University of Washington Campus at the Health Sciences Library, and travel expenses to Seattle will be paid for selected participants. Participants will be chosen based on geographic diversity and the student populations they serve. Please fill out this short survey if you are interested:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/X5JMVLP

The training for Washington State is a pilot project and future training for other states in our region may be offered, based on the outcome. Questions? Contact Patricia Devine, 206-543-8275 or devine@uw.edu.

Turning the Page!

Thursday, February 13th, 2014

angela ruffinAngela B. Ruffin, Ph.D. has announced her retirement, effective February 28, 2014.  This is certainly a significant milestone for her.  And, it is the end of an era for all who have worked closely with Dr. Ruffin, known by most as Angela!  She has been the National Library of Medicine (NLM) administrator for contracts that University of Washington Health Sciences Library has with NLM. Several of us have worked very closely with her over the years and she has been a very important person in our work lives.

When we say goodbye to her, Angela will have given almost 14 years of distinguished service as Head, National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) Office in the Division of Library Operations, National Library of Medicine. Before that, she had 10 years of successful experience in coordinating outreach programs for the NN/LM Office. In fact, she spearheaded the first round of 30 Grateful Med outreach projects conducted by hospital libraries nationwide, including one in each state of the PNR! She went on to provide unflappable leadership and dedication to the mission of the NN/LM, a program she helped to dramatically expand in scope and focus to reflect paradigm shifts in healthcare and health information delivery, along with changing roles of the information professional.

Prior to coming to NLM in 1990, she taught at several Schools of Library and Information Science and served as media coordinator for the Durham City Schools. Angela received her B.A. from Spelman College, her M.S.L.S. from Atlanta University (now Clark-Atlanta University), and her Ed.M in educational psychology from Boston University. She then received her Ph.D. in Information and Library Science from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Please join us in congratulating Angela on her career and well-deserved retirement!