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Archive for the ‘News From NN/LM PNR’ Category

Resources on Depression from the NIH

Tuesday, August 12th, 2014

The recent death of Oscar-winning actor and comedian Robin Williams from an apparent suicide has brought attention to the plight of many who suffer from depression, an estimated 1 in 10 adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Depression can be debilitating to those who suffer as well as their friends and family. It can also adversely affect outcomes of chronic and other health conditions, and it can lead to unhealthy behaviors. Although many people with depression do not seek treatment or are not helped by the treatment they receive, the majority can improve with treatment.

The National Library of Medicine’s consumer health resource, MedlinePlus, offers a variety of resources about depression, including educational videos and tutorials, materials in other languages (and the entire site in Spanish), links to symptoms and treatment options, patient handouts, and ways to connect with organizations and support groups. NIHSeniorHealth.gov also provides consumer-based information specific to seniors, as depression is a common problem among older adults. SeniorHealth.gov has the option to increase text size and change the contrast, to make it easier to read. The NIH National Institute on Aging has added depression resources, including causes and prevention, and toll-free numbers to call for help.

The NIH National Institute of Mental Health is the primary organization for research about depression. Check their website for information on clinical trials, health topics, funding opportunities and current research priorities. The also publish booklets, fact sheets and brochure; and host monthly Twitter chats.

 

Science Boot Camp West 2014

Wednesday, August 6th, 2014

sbcLOGO
Science Boot Camp for Librarians – West 2014 was held in beautiful, sunny and warm Seattle at the University of Washington July 9 – 11.  This event was made possible, in part, by an NN/LM PNR Symposium Award.  This was the second annual “western” version of Science Boot Camp for Librarians, based on the original Science Boot Camp held each summer in Massachusetts.  This conference is an opportunity for academic librarians to hear about three different fields of science and research processes from the researchers themselves, which helps librarians to better facilitate the research of faculty and students. This year we took a different approach to developing our boot camp curriculum and decided to find speakers under the umbrella of a common theme: disasters.  We had six academic researchers discuss their disaster-related work.

On Wednesday the 9th University of Washington professors Brian Atwater and David Montgomery spoke on Geology and Geomorphology.  Dr. Atwater briefly highlighted some of his research on historic Cascadia quakes and then invited two guest lecturers visiting from Pakistan, Ghazala Naeem, architect and natural-hazards specialist from Islamabad, and Din Mohammad Kakar, earthquake geologist from University of Balochistan, to address their current work.  Dr. Montgomery then explained the field of geomorphology to the audience and discussed the recent landslide disaster that occurred in Oso, Washington. Day one came to an end at the UW Club where campers mingled and dined while listening to guest speaker, Seattle Times science reporter Sandi Doughton discuss her recent book, Full-Rip 9.0: The Next Big Earthquake in the Pacific Northwest.  Doughton’s talk was a nice way to close the day as she relied on the work of both of the day’s earlier speakers to write her book, an exposé of the Pacific Northwest’s  history of “megaquakes” and what it will mean for us to have ” a big one” in the future.

Thursday, Day 2, kicked off with Jan Newton, Senior Principal Oceanographer, Applied Physics Lab at UW, speaking about ocean acidification.  She was followed by Robert Pavia, from the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs at UW, who discussed data collection and analysis during a disaster, looking specifically at the Deep Water Horizon oil spill. Thursday afternoon campers had a choice of attending a four-hour workshop on either Disaster Informatics or Data Librarianship.  The warm and sunny Seattle summer weather held up for an evening BBQ and boat ride around Lake Union and Lake Washington.

Boot Camp concluded with two health sciences speakers, Randy Beaton, emeritus from the Schools of Nursing and Public Health and David Townes, faculty in the Department of Emergency Medicine.  Dr. Beaton addressed issues related to mental health in disaster situations, including how to better study first responders.  Dr. Townes Day 3 discussing how policy, politics and emergency medicine come together when responding to global disasters, examining the current war in Syria in particular.

To get a broader perspective on the event, from some of the attendees themselves, a round up of the tweets from Science Boot Camp West 2014 are available on Storify and pictures on instagram.  Videos of the presentations are available on the conference’s LibGuide: http://guides.lib.washington.edu/2014SBCW_videos.

Free Online Course Offering: Clinical Trials.gov: Results Reporting, Unique Evidence, and the Role of Medical Librarians

Friday, August 1st, 2014

Interested in getting Consumer Health Information Specialization or Medical Library Association CE contact hours in the comfort of your own home, workplace, or favorite coffeehouse?  NN/LM MCR has got you covered with a 4 credit hour CE online class on ClinicalTrials.gov.  Read on for the details: (more…)

It’s Funding Season Again At NN/LM PNR

Friday, July 25th, 2014

MoneyTree Clip Art

It’s not too late for Network members in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to consider submitting a proposal for an NN/LM PNR award! We have a new suite of funding opportunities to inspire outreach in your communities or new projects within your organizations.  We’d love to see some more statements of intent to apply by the deadline of July 29th.

As you plan activities for the Fall, consider applying for the Health Disparities Information Outreach Award — for up to $5,000 to increase awareness of health disparities and the National Library of Medicine’s resources.

Or, maybe a Health Information Services Award is just the ticket, funded up to $5,000, to support projects that promote the value of health information services within an organization or for the community.

If you need support for purchase, installation, and/or upgrading of hardware and software, consider applying for a Technology Improvement Award for up to $10,000.

Or, you may want funding (up to $10,000) to plan and host an event sparking interest and participation by colleagues from around the region, via a Regional Symposium award.

For each award, proposals will be accepted until August 19, 2014. However, if you plan to submit an application, we need a brief statement of intent no later than July 29, 2014 to help our planning process. Please submit your statement of intent to apply to nnlm@uw.edu.

We also offer ongoing funding (ranging from $500 to $2,000) to support costs for professional development, library student scholarship , assessment and planning, training, and exhibit activities. These ongoing awards are available until funds are expended.

Lastly, if you need funding to carryout a project, but you are not sure there is a ‘fit’ with these currently available award categories, please drop us a line (nnlm@uw.edu) by July 29 and briefly describe your idea so we can discuss the possibilities with you.

Visualization Literacy

Monday, July 21st, 2014

This is a guest post written by Nikki Dettmar, Evaluation Librarian, Outreach Evaluation Resource Center

With an increase of technology tools available for data reporting and visualization (be sure to check out some of our Outreach Evaluation Resource Center Reporting and Visualizing tools at http://guides.nnlm.gov/oerc/tools) sometimes it’s challenging to know how to best use them to clearly communicate the intended meaning of the data. The concept of visualization literacy and a broader theme of visual literacy are often not included as part of the instructions guiding people in the steps to create their own visualization design.

A recent entry by Andrew Kirk on the blog of Seeing Data, a research project in the United Kingdom studying how people understand big data visualizations shown in the media, offers a great review of 8 Articles Discussing Visual and Visualization Literacy that are freely available and well worth a read to better understand both visual and visualization literacy. Their featured articles include resources ranging from the importance of Visual Literacy in an Age of Data to How to Be an Educated Consumer of Infographics, and Seeing Data has asked that you share additional ones with them via blog comments or their Twitter social media account @SeeingData.

PNR Rendezvous for July 23 – Salud Se Puede

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

Salud Se Puede (Good Health Is Possible): Promotoras and Health Information Needs in the Latino Community presented by Seth Doyle of the Northwest Regional Primary Care Association and Cindy Olney of the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center.

July 23, 2014 at 1 PM Pacific (noon Alaska 2 PM Mountain)

Community Health Workers (CHWs) continue to gain national recognition as valuable, if not essential, members of the healthcare workforce.  According to a 2007 CHW Workforce Study conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), there were 86,000 CHWs in the United States in 2000, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects this to be among the fastest growing occupations in the health care field.  CHWs go by many names, including outreach worker, peer health educator, and patient navigator.  In Spanish speaking communities CHWs are commonly referred to as promotores(as) de salud.  CHWs play a vital role in facilitating health care access, while addressing disparities and improving health outcomes.  Seth Doyle will provide a brief overview of the CHW model and review current examples of CHW practices and initiatives.

Building from this overview, Cindy Olney will describe a story-based method used to assess the Health Information Hispanic Outreach (HIHO) Colonias Project conducted by the University of Texas Health Science Center Library.  Promotores de sauld who worked with low-income Hispanic neighborhoods (colonias) in the Lower Rio Grande Valley were trained to use MedlinePlus en español to help residents find information about their health concerns. The stories collected throughout this project illustrated in detail how colonias residents benefitted from the promotoras’ health information outreach activities.

To attend go to http://webmeeting.nih.gov/rendezvous and login as a Guest, using your own name.  Once logged into the web meeting, a pop-up box allows you to put in your phone number and the program will call you. If this does not happen, just call the 800 number and use the participant code that appears in the Notes box on the screen.

If you are unable to tune in live, we invite you to view a recording of the webcast, posted to the Rendezvous website later.

As part of our Federal agency services regarding electronic and information technology resources being accessible to people with disabilities, closed captioning is available on this and future PNR Rendezvous webcasts.