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Archive for the ‘Health Literacy/Consumer Health’ Category

Understanding the Evidence Behind the Headlines Webinar, August 12

Monday, August 10th, 2015

Please join us at the University of Washington for this webinar from the Medical Library Association: “Consumers and Evidence-Based Practice: Understanding the Evidence Behind the Headlines.”

Researchers report that older adults who slept more than 8 hours a night were 46% more likely to suffer strokes and that families who hand-wash the dishes are about 40% less likely to develop allergies. What is the evidence? This webinar will take the headlines promoting new research findings and explain the study designs behind them.

Join us at the University of Washington Health Sciences Library, Room LTL on the 3rd floor, 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM, Wednesday, August 12. If you cannot join us in person, please let me know and I can provide you with a link to the recording of the webinar.

 

New PNR Moodle Class – Health Issues in the Headlines: Learning to Read Between the Lines

Tuesday, July 21st, 2015

cooking-chocolate-674508_640Dark chocolate, red wine, and stem cells – what do these have in common?  All have been reported in the news as having health benefits.  Often the first place your patrons will hear about health issues is in the media.  This interactive, hands-on CE course will introduce participants to the environment of health reporting.  Participants will learn about how health is reported in the news as well as how to evaluate the accuracy and validity of science and health stories.  The impact of celebrity illness will also be discussed.  By the end of this course, participants will be better equipped to help their patrons look more critically at health issues that are being reported in the news media.  Actual news articles and research reports will be included for critique. (more…)

Upcoming Institute of Medicine (IOM) Roundtable on Health Literacy workshop on palliative care

Wednesday, July 1st, 2015

What: Health Literacy and Palliative Care

Where: Keck Building, Room 100, 500 5th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001 and online via free webcast

When: July 9, 2015, 8:30 AM – 5:30 PM Eastern Time  (4:30am – 1:30pm Alaska Time, 5:30am – 2:30pm Pacific Time, 6:30am – 3:30pm Mountain Time)

More Information and to register for online or in person: http://www.iom.edu/Activities/PublicHealth/HealthLiteracy/2015-JUL-09.aspx

On July 9, 2015, the Roundtable on Health Literacy will hold a workshop featuring invited presentations and discussions of the effect of low health literacy on all aspects of palliative care. In general, low health literacy is a barrier to receiving high quality health care. This is particularly important for people living with serious or chronic illnesses that require complex management regimens and have significant symptoms or treatments with significant side effects. (more…)

Celebrate Older Americans Month this month of May

Wednesday, May 13th, 2015

agingIn 1963, after a meeting between President Kennedy and the National Council of Senior Citizens, May was designated as Senior Citizens Month which eventually came to be called Older Americans Month.  Originally it was a time to acknowledge the contributions of older Americans especially those who had defended the United States.  Older Americans month is a time to pay tribute the invaluable services and contributions of past and present senior citizens to our communities.  It is also a time to be aware of the unique health issues older Americans face as well as realizing the strides that have been made.

When Older Americans month was first established, only 17 million Americans had reached their 65th birthday and almost a third lived in poverty.  Today, the average life expectancy is 78.1 years and many service and health programs have been created that focus on older Americans.  NIH Senior Health website offers health information resources on topics of importance to the aging population in an easy to understand and user friendly format.  It’s also National Physical Fitness and Sports Month. To celebrate both observances, go to the National Institute on Aging’s  Go4Life to learn how older adults can add physical activity to their daily lives by using tracking tools, tip sheets, and other motivational tools. So, Get Into the Act, this year’s Older Americans Month theme and promote the healthy lives of our older generation!

MedlinePlus Releases New Responsive Web Design

Tuesday, April 28th, 2015

Today, MedlinePlus (http://medlineplus.gov/) and MedlinePlus en español (http://medlineplus.gov/spanish) released a completely redesigned site with a fresh look and feel.

2015-04-28_13-07-51

The new version of MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español uses responsive design for ease of use on any device, whether that is a desktop monitor or mobile touchscreen.  Responsive pages automatically change their layout to fit your screen.  See our announcement page for more details.  (more…)

April is National Minority Health Month

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015

Typically most people think of minorities in regards to race or ethnicity.  However, minorities can also include sexual identity, age, geographic location, disability, gender and socioeconomics.  For many, being part of one or more of these categories often contributes to health disparities. According to Healthy People 2020, “To better understand the context of disparities, it is important to understand more about the U.S. population. ” In 2008, the U.S. population was estimated at 304 million.

  • In 2008, approximately 33 percent, or more than 100 million persons, identified themselves as belonging to a racial or ethnic minority population.
  • In 2008, 51 percent, or 154 million, were women.
  • In 2008, approximately 12 percent, or 36 million people not living in nursing homes or other residential care facilities, had a disability.
  • In 2008, an estimated 70.5 million persons lived in rural areas (23 percent of the population), while roughly 233.5 million lived in urban areas (77 percent).
  • In 2002, an estimated 4 percent of the U.S. population aged 18 to 44 years identified themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender.

Progress has been made to close the gap in health disparities but the work needs to continue to narrow the gap so that everyone has equal opportunities for better health whether it is accessing and understanding health insurance, health literacy, having preventative care available, or open communication between patients and clinicians. (more…)