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Rendezvous: It Ain’t Me: Clinician Bias

Research shows that just talking about clinician bias in the treatment of patients decreases it (1,2,3).  Join us for a one-hour session to learn more:

Free RML Rendezvous webcast, Wednesday, June 16, 2010, at 1:00 p.m. Pacific Time. Connect at: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/rendezvous to view the live presentation.

It Ain’t Me! Promoting Awareness of the Impact of Clinician Bias and Stereotyping on Health Disparities, by Jim Anderson, PA-C, ATC, Harborview Medical Center Neurological Surgery and Clinical Faculty, MEDEX NW, University of Washington School of Medicine

We look forward to seeing you at the webcast! For more information and to test your computer connection, please visit How do I connect to the Rendezvous?

  1. Burgess D, van Ryn M, Crowley‐Matoka M, Malat J. (2006). Understanding the provider contribution to race/ethnicity disparities in pain treatment: insights from dual process models of stereotyping. Pain Med,7(2):119‐134.
  2. Kunda Z, Spencer S. (2003) When do stereotypes come to mind and when do they color judgment? A goal‐based theoretical framework for stereotype activation and application. Psychol Bull. Jul;129(4):522‐544.
  3. Rudman L, Ashmore R, Gary M. (2001) “Unlearning” automatic biases: the malleability of implicit prejudice and stereotypes. J Pers Soc Psychol. Nov, 81(5):856‐868.

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