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November is National Diabetes Month

turkeyThanksgiving is soon approaching, a time when many are giving thanks for food, family and health. Many favorite dishes are loaded with sugars and it is tempting to overeat. This can be a health issue for those with diabetes. Whether we have a family history or not, we shouldn’t deprive ourselves but rather, consider eating in moderation while enjoying a great feast.

The Diabetes Educator website provides a nice visual on how to divide your plate along with some healthier recipes: https://www.diabeteseducator.org/export/sites/aade/_resources/pdf/general/ThanksgivingPlateResource.pdf

The American Diabetes Association includes tips on Navigating the Thanksgiving Feast and other holiday tips:

http://www.diabetes.org/mfa-recipes/tips/2012-11/navigating-the-holiday-feast.html
http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/holiday-meal-planning/

So go ahead and enjoy the feast but remember that if you’re thankful for your health, stuff that turkey and not yourself! Read more »

2014 Medical Librarians Month – Magnet Recognition

In our last entry for 2014 Medical Librarians Month, Dana Kopp describes her role in her institution’s journey to receive Magnet Recognition.  Although this brings us to the end of our contest, we are always interested in hearing your stories! Please let me know if you would like to do a guest post for Dragonfly.

by Dana Kopp, MLS
Manager – Library Services
The Learning Center
Providence St. Patrick Hospital
Missoula, MT

My involvement with our Magnet Journey began in 2009 when I was one of three people sent to a Magnet Journey to Excellence workshop in San Diego. The Nursing Shared Governance Advisory Council and Professional Development Councils had determined that they thought our nurses were ready to begin the Journey and deserved recognition for the fantastic work they do every day. The Advisory Council had begun a gap analysis and found that they really weren’t sure where we stood because there were so many unanswered questions about each Component. The gap analysis was put on hold while we educated ourselves on the process and requirements. I was chosen to attend the workshop because I had taken the MLA Getting Magnetized course a few months earlier and had more knowledge about the Magnet Components than many others. Read more »

2014 Medical Librarians Month – Making a Difference in Swaziland

Janet Schnall’s experience as an Invited Lecturer to a newly open nursing school in Swaziland and a return trip to teach  students and faculty preparing to open a medical school is next in our stories about librarians making a difference.

By Janet Schnall, MS, AHIP
Information Management Librarian
University of Washington
Seattle, WA

Have I as a librarian changed lives? I believe YES!

Last year as University of Washington Health Sciences Library liaison to the UW School of Nursing I received an email from a former UW PhD nursing student, Gloria Nam, whom I had previously assisted with her dissertation, asking for book donations for a new nursing school opening in Swaziland.

Dr. Nam, PhD, MSN, FNP, RN was to become the Head of Department of Nursing Science and Dean of Student Affairs at Swaziland Christian University (SCU). Although I did not have nursing texts to donate, I did inform Dr. Nam about HINARI, the World Health Organization program that enables low and middle income countries to gain access to a large collection of health-related journals, eBooks and databases, such as PubMed.

Shortly after, I was asked to come for several weeks as Invited Lecturer to this newly opened nursing school in Swaziland to introduce online health information resources to the faculty and students, train them on the HINARI World Health Organization program, and assist the new librarian in establishing a health sciences library at the University. Read more »

2014 Medical Librarians Month – A Journey

Jackie Wirz’ entry in our contest for Medical Librarians Month tells the story of her journey from a PhD in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology to Biomedical Sciences Information Specialist. It all started one night in the ER when she knew that Google was not the right tool.

by Jackie Wirz
Biomedical Research Specialist
Oregon Health & Science University

Portland, OR

Sitting in the emergency room, I felt a surprising sense of calm. Going to the ER in the middle of the night was an extreme precaution – although the chemical to which I was exposed could be potentially very dangerous, I was feeling normal (well, as normal as one could feel while doing a 36 hour protein purification). No burning lungs, no severe nausea, just a sense of mild boredom while I was waiting to be seen.

I was told that it was my lucky night, as one of the attending physicians happened to be an expert in chemical exposure. He bustled into the room, firmly shaking my hand while giving me a critical once over. Having ascertained there was no immediate danger; he turned to the computer and asked me to name the chemical I was exposed to. I replied, and watched with mounting horror as he opened up Firefox, and proceeded to Google the name of the chemical. Read more »

2014 Medical Librarians Month – Meeting Jane

For our 2014 Medical Librarians Month Contest, Basia Delawska-Elliott told us her story about making a difference in a patient’s life.

by Basia Delawska-Elliott
Health Sciences Librarian
Providence St. Vincent Medical Center
Portland, OR

Meeting Jane

I was just coming back from lunch when I ran into Jane at the hospital entrance. I was so glad to see her! Jane was a cancer patient, who used to be a library regular, but she had not come into the library for quite a while and I feared the worst.

Jane first came to see us having just received a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Straight from the doctor’s office she marched into the library. I am sure that she was devastated and scared, yet she was determined to learn as much as she could and to stay in control of her treatment. I remember when she walked in to the library she had a look of determination on her face. She sat down, told me of her diagnosis and then before I could respond in any way she said “I am going to need a lot of information to beat this thing and I am hoping you can help me with that”. I immediately assured her that I would be glad to help in any way I could. Jane wasn’t the first cancer patient that came to the library seeking information, but she was definitely the most matter-of-fact about what she needed to do, and that set the tone for our relationship. Read more »

2014 Medical Librarians Month Contest Winner

We are happy to announce Kathy Fatkin as the winner of the 2014 Medical Librarians Month Contest! Kathy has won a $1500 travel scholarship to MLA 2015 in Austin, Texas. Thanks to all who entered and for telling us your story about how you have made a difference.  Additional entries will be posted over the next few days.

by Kathy J. Fatkin PhD, AHIP, RN
Medical Librarian, Researcher & Evidence-Based Practice Coordinator
Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center
Idaho Falls, ID

I am a solo librarian working at a community hospital and like other health sciences librarians I work to provide health information that will improve lives. In my position I serve on the hospital’s nursing research council (NRC) and as a group the NRC works on evidence-based nursing practice. We have performed multiple literature reviews with summaries of evidence to guide clinical nursing practice. This activity gave me practice reading and evaluating research articles. I realized I have the skills not only to find current evidence but I could add value to my library services by including summaries of evidence to save time for the clinical staff. Read more »