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Feature Slides

  • PubMed ® for Trainers

    Do you train others to use PubMed? If so, join us for PubMed for Trainers, a hybrid class with 3 online sessions and 1 in-person session (eligible for 15 MLA CE credits). The class is an in-depth look at PubMed and a chance to share training ideas with your fellow participants.

    PubMed ® for Trainers

    PubMed ® for Trainers Picture
  • Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    The "Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching" course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI.

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics Picture
  • TOXNET® and Beyond

    This course is designed to convey the basics of searching the NLM's TOXNET®, a Web-based system of databases in the areas of toxicology, environmental health, and related fields.

    TOXNET® and Beyond

    TOXNET® and Beyond Picture
  • Teaching with Technology

    Learn how to take advantage of online tools to offer distance education classes and enhance face to face classes! Join us for this "asynchronous" (on your own time) class. The class is taught over 5 weeks and is eligible for 8 MLA CE credits.

    Teaching with Technology

    Teaching with Technology Picture
  • PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed for Librarians is made up of five one-hour segments. These five segments will be presented via Adobe Connect and recorded for archival access. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend.

    PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed® for Librarians Picture

Save the Dates: 2015 “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” Course

“This course was a great idea and very well executed! I learned a lot and am much more confident going back to my institution and teaching these resources as well as starting an information service. It’ll take time to become proficient but this was a great start!”
“The singularly most useful and interesting class I’ve taken in years.”
               — Comments from recent class participants

Attention health science librarians in the United States who wish to initiate and/or extend bioinformatics services at your institution! The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and the NLM Training Center (NTC) will be offering “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” course in 2015. Participants who complete the class will be eligible for Medical Library Association (MLA) Continuing Education credits. The course is free, but travel costs are at the expense of the participant.

There are two parts to the course, and applicants must take both parts:

  • Part 1: “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching” is a six-week, online (asynchronous) pre-course.
  • Part 2: A five-day in-person course offered on-site at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland.

Important Dates:
Monday, September 29, 2014 – Watch for a detailed announcement about the course and application process here in the NLM Technical Bulletin.
Monday, November 17, 2014 – Application deadline
Monday, December 15, 2014 – Acceptance notifications e-mailed
Monday, January 12, 2015 – “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching” pre-course begins
Monday, March 9, 2015 – “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” five-day in-person class begins at NLM

Mark your calendars for this training opportunity.

Questions?  E-mail ntc@utah.edu.

In Case You Missed It

Not on Twitter? Here are a few of the most popular links we’ve shared in the last few months:

If you’d like to follow us, you can find us @nnlmntc.

How far back do citations go in TOXLINE?

Training Materials for PubMed, MeSH, My NCBI, and LinkOut

Do you teach others about PubMed? Did you know that the National Library of Medicine has a resource page of PubMed instructional materials? The next time you’re building a class or helping a user, instead of reinventing the wheel (or the tutorial), check to see if one already exists. The resources on this page include pamphlets, handouts, slides, and videos and can be reused and adapted for your own training.

Screen capture table of MeSH materials on linked PubMed Instructional materials page

Have an idea for a different topic or format? You can contact NLM (see the link on the above website) or the NTC.

NLM Apps for iOS and Android

Do you have an iPhone, iPad or Android device? The National Library of Medicine has developed a number of free apps for some of their databases.

nlm apps

Visit your nearest iOS or Android download site to find these apps.

Assessment on the Fly

With just an hour of classroom time (or less!) how can you fit in assessment? How can you tell if your students have gained the skill you’ve taught or understand a critical concept?

Rubric showing ratings of 5 to 1 with eyeglasses in upper left corner

TeachThought had a recent blog post detailing several assessment strategies, and I thought I’d share a few here.

1. Ticket out the door: Have students write the answer to a question, an a-ha moment or lingering question on a scrap of paper or sticky note and collect them on the way out the door to a break or to leave. This is a quick way to see what stood out to the class and one we’ve used here at the NTC.

2. Ask students to reflect: Before class ends, have students jot down what they learned or how they will apply it in the future.

3. Misconception check: Describe a common misconception about the concept you’re teaching, or show an example of something done incorrectly. Ask students to identify and correct the problem.

4. Peer instruction: Ask a question and have students pair-up and explain the correct answer and why to their partner. Walk around and listen to their responses to assess whether the concept needs to be revisited.

To see the rest of the list of simple assessments you can try, see the blog on TeachThought.

5 Reasons We Forget Presentations

Carmen Simon is an executive coach at Rexi Media, a company that teaches presentation skills to professionals. I heard her speak several years ago at the Presentation Summit; an annual conference devoted to better PowerPoint presentations.

In a presentation posted on SlideShare.net, Simon identified 5 reasons why we forget the content of a presentation. See the reasons below and you can also view all of the accompanying PowerPoint slides.

Reason #1: We don’t pay attention to content in the first place.
Reason #2: Some information is too similar to other information.
Reason #3: Content is not processed deeply enough.
Reason #4: Too many presentations are factual and non-participatory.
Reason #5: The list of items presented is too long.

Poll: How do you offer training?

Tell us how you offer training or teach classes with this short poll.

Create your free online surveys with SurveyMonkey , the world’s leading questionnaire tool.

Fight or Flight?

What type of presenter are you? Does your heart start to beat fast? Does your mouth get dry? If so, you are not alone. These are common effects from the fight or flight response that developed in humans to protect us from danger. Being familiar with the signs of fear can help you prepare for it. Let us know how you feel about presenting. After you take the survey, you can review the SlideShare presentation below for a few tips on how to keep fear from taking over. If you decide to try the suggestion on slide 45, take a picture and send it to the NTC.
 

View the presentation below for some tips on taming stage fright. from Jerson James

Displaying Author Information

Here’s a quick tip how to have author affiliation information in PubMed open or closed by default when signed in to your My NCBI account.