Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About NTC | Contact NTC | NTC Feedback |NTC Sitemap | Help | Bookmark and Share

Feature Slides

  • PubMed ® for Trainers

    Do you train others to use PubMed? If so, join us for PubMed for Trainers, a hybrid class with 3 online sessions and 1 in-person session (eligible for 15 MLA CE credits). The class is an in-depth look at PubMed and a chance to share training ideas with your fellow participants.

    PubMed ® for Trainers

    PubMed ® for Trainers Picture
  • Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    The "Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching" course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI.

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics Picture
  • TOXNET® and Beyond

    This course is designed to convey the basics of searching the NLM's TOXNET®, a Web-based system of databases in the areas of toxicology, environmental health, and related fields.

    TOXNET® and Beyond

    TOXNET® and Beyond Picture
  • Teaching with Technology

    Learn how to take advantage of online tools to offer distance education classes and enhance face to face classes! Join us for this "asynchronous" (on your own time) class. The class is taught over 5 weeks and is eligible for 8 MLA CE credits.

    Teaching with Technology

    Teaching with Technology Picture
  • PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed for Librarians is made up of five one-hour segments. These five segments will be presented via Adobe Connect and recorded for archival access. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend.

    PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed® for Librarians Picture

The More You Know: My NCBI and Links Display

A little something to make your life easier.

Start the Music!

Playing music during training?  If you’re never experienced this, it might seem like an odd idea.  I’ve had this experience during some of the training sessions at the Bob Pike annual conference I attended last year.  The instructors played music as people were filtering in to the classroom.  The rationale, as this article discusses, is “to alleviate their tension and create a relaxed learning atmosphere.”  I’m happy to report that it worked!

Other ideas for music in training are to use it for transitioning from one activity to another (in short bits) and to use song parodies to revisit training content.  (If you can sing the exact words to any TV opening credits from your childhood, or sing the words to a French song from the 1970′s when you don’t know any other French, you know how powerful music is as a memory aid!)

Where to find the music?  Look for royalty-free music web sites.  If you try incorporating music into your training, let us know how it worked!

 

Effective Teaching Behaviors

What are some effective teaching behaviors that we can incorporate into our classes for learners of all types?  A post from the “Tomorrow’s Professor” mailing list, sponsored by the Stanford Center for Teaching and Learning, discussed eight behaviors to consider.   The behaviors that particularly intrigued me were:

“Teach for Understanding Rather Than Exposure”:  determine the “big ideas” behind the class

“Explicit Instruction”:  Tell students what they are going to learn, the rationale for learning the material, and how new material relates to what they already learned.

Scaffolded Instruction”:  The three stages of scaffolded instruction are:  1) Students watch the teacher perform a task; 2) teacher and student do the task together; 3) student does it alone.

“Errorless Learning”: Present the material using smaller steps so that students can achieve success without errors.

You can read the full article here.

 

What if the annoyances of conference calls happened in real-life meetings.

If you have ever attended an online meeting or class, let’s say PubMed for Trainers, then this video may ring true to you. Enjoy!

PubMed Update: Change to Author Affiliations

Here’s a video update on a recent change to author affiliations in PubMed.

You can read more about the change in the NLM Technical Bulletin articles from September 2013 and December 2013.

Who’s the Boss?

Tell Technology you’re Boss! 3 Tips from blogger TalentCulture from Brazen Careerist.

While technology has helped us all take great strides, sometimes it’s good to scale back a little. Here are 3 ideas to rein in technology.

1) Make an email policy.

What do you do when you just want to check your Inbox and you see a time sensitive email? TalentCulture suggests: Everyone has 24 hours to reply to all non-emergency emails; build in a time buffer, just to be on the safe side

2) Be Here Now.

Try having a device-free meeting (other than the presentation computer) so people can be more engaged and less distracted. I worked for an organization that held an annual planning meeting. I remember more than once not being able to use a computer during the day-long meeting.

3) Say Goodbye.

TalentCulture says: “When you’re away from the office, leave the office behind.” We know that sometimes that isn’t possible, but having a designated place to work and a place to leave work behind (even at home) is important. It’s good to unplug from work.

Meet the NTC Staff: Matt Steadman

Hello, I am Matt Steadman, I began working with NN/LM in July of 2011 and am the web software developer for NTC, and also work with the MidContinental Region. I’m responsible for the underlying code of the NTC website, the NN/LM Class Registration System, NTC’s graphics and course logos, ensuring compliance with regulations and best practices for the website, and whatever other similar tasks come up.

I received my Bachelor of Science in 2012 in Computer Engineering from the University of Utah in 2012. Throughout my education I applied my skills in various capacities, I have worked as a web developer, business analyst, data analyst, graphic artist, and as an assembler of electronics. Although until I found myself working with the NTC, I didn’t even know that Medical Librarians existed. Since then I have learned a lot about the role that Medical librarians play and am very honored to assist both my coworkers and the many librarians that we train.

My wife Emily and I are about to celebrate our 8th anniversary, and are expecting our first child in July!
Matt&Emily

Is Your Training Room Introvert Friendly?

A recent article on the Bob Pike Training Group website by Jordan Meyers discusses strategies that trainers can use to foster an environment that feels comfortable to participants.

Here are a few things that trainers can do to help ease the experience.

  • People don’t like being unprepared. If you’re planning on having a class discussion or doing small group work, consider giving an assignment that looks at the topic prior to class. Now, people will be better prepared to contribute to the discussion which will hopefully alleviate some discomfort.
  • Another approach suggested by Meyers is to progressively grow the size of the group. Start by having people work in pairs where they can get their feet wet on a (new) topic. Then grow the groups to 4 or 6 and so on…or some variation on that theme.
  • Use an ice breaker to flesh out potential online technical problems before you start the “real” group work. For example, if an exercise requires participants to unmute their phone, then have all participants unmute themselves and identify which state they were born in. This gives everyone the opportunity to test their system.

Read the article here: http://bobpikegroup.com/Resources/Articles/340

Flipping the Flipped Classroom

The flipped classroom has been all over education news for the past few years, but a recent study presents a new finding on flipping the classroom.

In the current model of a flipped classroom, students read or watch videos about a topic and then apply what they learned to solve problems or complete projects. A new study from the Stanford Graduate School of Education says that we might just have that backwards. In this study of graduate and undergraduate students, half the students first read about the neuroscience of vision, while the other half first used a simulation tool to manipulate and explore neural networks. Then, each group of students did the other task. At the end, the students took a test and researchers found at 25-percent increase in performance in those who had the opportunity for exploration first. 

Paulo Blikstein, one of the study authors, says, “”We are showing that exploration, inquiry and problem solving are not just ‘nice to have’ things in classrooms. They are powerful learning mechanisms that increase performance by every measure we have.”

What do you think? Have you ever considered starting a class with some open-ended exploration? How did it work?

Questions Anyone?

Those two words (or any variation) make me dread the seconds that follow. Sometimes someone asks a question and I’m relieved that I’m not going to be left at the front of the room feeling like I offered a hand shake and nobody shook it back; a little awkward. So, we’re there at the front of the room or online doing some synchronous training and we ask: are there any questions? Current training trends suggest that you wait 9 seconds before moving on to give students time to catch up and formulate a question. But that isn’t even the issue I’m talking about here today.

Today, I am suggesting that we don’t even want to ask “are there any questions?”. Maybe the students will tell us, within 9 seconds, that they don’t have questions. OK. Asked and answered. However, if truth be told, I want more than a yes or a no answer. I want a conversation. I want a little back and forth with the students. So, instead of asking a question that may cut off any future discussion, try one of these 5 open-ended questions posed by Rebecca Alber of edutopia.org and an instructor at UCLA’s Graduate School of Education.

  1. What do you think? This question is designed to get input from the class and is not a yes or no question. Yea!
  2. Why do you think that? This question is designed to make sure the student knows how or why they came to their answer.
  3. How do you know this? This question might elicit examples from experience.
  4. Can you tell me more? Need I say more about this question?
  5. What questions do you still have? This question is designed to loop back around to the beginning or stir up new questions about what was just discussed (hopefully, there was a discussion).