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Feature Slides

  • PubMed ® for Trainers

    Do you train others to use PubMed? If so, join us for PubMed for Trainers, a hybrid class with 3 online sessions and 1 in-person session (eligible for 15 MLA CE credits). The class is an in-depth look at PubMed and a chance to share training ideas with your fellow participants.

    PubMed ® for Trainers

    PubMed ® for Trainers Picture
  • Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    The "Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching" course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI.

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics Picture
  • TOXNET® and Beyond

    This course is designed to convey the basics of searching the NLM's TOXNET®, a Web-based system of databases in the areas of toxicology, environmental health, and related fields.

    TOXNET® and Beyond

    TOXNET® and Beyond Picture
  • Teaching with Technology

    Learn how to take advantage of online tools to offer distance education classes and enhance face to face classes! Join us for this "asynchronous" (on your own time) class. The class is taught over 5 weeks and is eligible for 8 MLA CE credits.

    Teaching with Technology

    Teaching with Technology Picture
  • PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed for Librarians is made up of five one-hour segments. These five segments will be presented via Adobe Connect and recorded for archival access. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend.

    PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed® for Librarians Picture

Fight or Flight?

What type of presenter are you? Does your heart start to beat fast? Does your mouth get dry? If so, you are not alone. These are common effects from the fight or flight response that developed in humans to protect us from danger. Being familiar with the signs of fear can help you prepare for it. Let us know how you feel about presenting. After you take the survey, you can review the SlideShare presentation below for a few tips on how to keep fear from taking over. If you decide to try the suggestion on slide 45, take a picture and send it to the NTC.
 

View the presentation below for some tips on taming stage fright. from Jerson James

Displaying Author Information

Here’s a quick tip how to have author affiliation information in PubMed open or closed by default when signed in to your My NCBI account.

 

TOXMAP: How to Search for a Chemical

Watch the video to learn how to search the new TOXMAP interface for a chemical.

Teaching the Google Generation

A few months ago, TeachThought had a blog post entitled 10 Ways Teacher Planning Should Adjust to the Google Generation. While their posts are often geared toward K-12 educators, it can be helpful to think about the students soon coming to your schools or hospitals — or those who are already there.

TeachThought suggests that you make the work Google-proof, that is, it should be something in which a few searches and clicks can’t locate a single answer. Instead, think of questions that require the synthesis of multiple sources, ideas, or media. Secondly, they recommend using questions that have no real answers. These first two recommendations go hand-in-hand. Using a complex case or scenario can spark engagement and interest, give a context to the lesson, and provide an opportunity to teach about databases and search skills. You can use a real reference question or work with a clinician to develop a few realistic scenarios appropriate for the audience.

Their fourth point is to focus on learning strategies rather than specific content that may be fluid. We all know with changing interface designs, new databases, and advances in technology students and faculty will have to adjust to changes over the course of their time as clinicians or researchers. By resisting the urge to “cover” everything and focusing on how to wade through the information deluge, they’ll take with them skills for their entire careers.

 

TOXMAP Interface Updated: Watch the Video

PubMed: E-mail Alerts for Articles from your Favorite Journals

Watch this short video to learn how to setup alerts from journals of your choice in PubMed.

MLA 2014: NLM Theater Presentations

Now Showing

If you were unable to attend MLA in Chicago this year or if you missed some of the presentations at the National Library of Medicine booth, you can view the presentations online.

Follow the link to a list of all the videos: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/mj14/mj14_mla_theater_presentations.html

Sharing a PubMed Collection

Your My NCBI account not only allows you to create a collection of citations, but you can share them too. Students may want to do this while working on a project together or maybe you’ve been asked to do a literature search and you want an easy way to share the results.

Watch a 2 minute video from the National Library of Medicine on how to share a collection or follow the link: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/viewlet/myncbi/sharing_collections.html

Top Teaching and Learning Tools: Part 2

Last week I shared with you a list of Top 100 Tools for Learning from the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies and how we at the NTC take advantage of the top 5 tools. This week, I’ll continue to share some of the technologies on the list and ideas for how you might use them in your own teaching and learning. Of course, we welcome your feedback and ideas for additional ways to take advantage of what the technologies offer.

phone with generic app icons

6. Evernote: Evernote is a tool I use daily in my work environment, but not one that the NTC “officially” uses. I keep short-term and long-term to do lists (I love the checkboxes), a list of books to read, and a standard packing list in Evernote. I use it to take and organize notes at meetings and conferences. One feature I really like is that I can take a picture with my tablet or phone and embed the picture in my Evernote note. This is especially useful if you just took a bunch of notes on a whiteboard and want to capture them for later. Your notes synch across your devices, so you always have them available.

7. Dropbox: Dropbox is a file storage tool that synchs across platforms and can be great for collaborating. When we travel for classes, I keep a copy of class materials in Dropbox just in case I have trouble accessing any of the other 3 locations where I have them stored. You can share files and folders without having to email them back and forth.

8. WordPress: You’re seeing our version of WordPress right now! We use WordPress as our webpage, the home page of which functions as a blog. While the content of the home page changes regularly, we keep semi-static pages as well. Do you use a blog in your own teaching or work? We’ve worked with one librarian who created a blog for a group of pediatric residents and posted any of their presentations from Grand Rounds so they would have them all in one place and could also use commenting features to ask questions. She also posted reference questions and resources to the blog as well.

9. Facebook: Are you following us on Facebook? We post our blog content on Facebook, as well as advertise new classes, post photos from our in-person classes and occasionally post a survey. Do you use Facebook in a teaching or learning capacity? We’ve heard of libraries and librarians that answer basic and reference questions on Facebook, but let us know how you use it!

10. Google+/Hangouts: The NTC doesn’t have Google+ account, but I’ve used the hangout feature for a larger group meeting (7 or 8 people), and it seemed to work well. It allows you to take advantage of webcams and you can share screen as well. Have you used hangouts?

11. Moodle: Moodle is the NTC’s course management system, so if you’ve ever taken a class with us, you’ve used Moodle. Moodle is a pretty versatile platform – we can create quizzes, have a discussion forum, share videos and tutorials, and many other types of content. It’s free, and open-source which gives it a little extra appeal. You can try out Moodle’s demo site as well.

Share with us on Facebook or Twitter how you use these tools!

 

NLM Seeks Input on the Future of the NN/LM

Responses Due by June 26!

The National Library of Medicine has issued Request for Information (RFI) NIHLM2014157, to seek input from a wide variety of current and potential user communities, including health sciences and public libraries, health professionals, public health workers, community organizations, the general public, and other interested individuals and entities, for recommendations on how the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) can maximize its effectiveness and efficiency in providing all U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information and improving the public’s access to health information.

All responses must be submitted via email to Justin Fraser and Uyen Phuong by 12:00 PM PDT June 26. Please include the Notice number in the subject line. Comments can include but are not limited to the following guiding questions:

Priorities, Strategies, Partnerships

  1. What priorities should the Network address? Provide recommendations.
  2. What strategies should be used to reach varied populations, including minorities and the underserved? (NLM is interested in hearing about strategies and practices that have proven successful in the past and that might point the way to future strategies and practices.)
  3. What are the most effective ways to partner with libraries, health, information, community organizations to reach health professionals, public health professionals, and the general public?

Outreach, Programs Training, Resource Sharing

  1. What new outreach roles and/or untapped outreach opportunities should be considered? What are barriers and opportunities in these new roles?
  2. Which Network programs should receive less emphasis or be considered for elimination? Why?
  3. What are the most effective strategies to support health sciences librarians in their knowledge and ability to support NLM products and services?
  4. What role should resource sharing (Interlibrary Loan) play in supporting the Network’s mission to promote access to biomedical and or health information?

Membership, Network Structure, Service Coordination

  1. What should be the responsibilities of Network membership? What should be the benefits?
  2. What type of Network advisory structure is needed?
  3. Will the geographical configuration of the Network meet future needs? What services of the Network could be coordinated nationally? What services are best coordinated at a local or regional level?

Response to this RFI is voluntary. Responders are free to address any or all of the categories listed above. NLM will use the information submitted in response to this RFI for planning purposes and is not obligated to comment or respond to any responder’s submission. However, responses to the RFI may be reflected in future solicitations. The information provided will be analyzed and may appear in reports. No proprietary, classified, confidential, or sensitive information should be included in responses.

Follow this link to submit your responses: Request for Information (RFI) NIHLM2014157,