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Feature Slides

  • PubMed ® for Trainers

    Do you train others to use PubMed? If so, join us for PubMed for Trainers, a hybrid class with 3 online sessions and 1 in-person session (eligible for 15 MLA CE credits). The class is an in-depth look at PubMed and a chance to share training ideas with your fellow participants.

    PubMed ® for Trainers

    PubMed ® for Trainers Picture
  • PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed for Librarians is made up of five one-hour segments. These five segments will be presented via Adobe Connect and recorded for archival access. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend.

    PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed® for Librarians Picture
  • Discovering TOXNET®

    Discover TOXNET and other NLM environmental health databases through videos, guided tutorials, and discovery exercises in thirteen independent modules. The independent modules cover TOXLINE, ChemIDplus, TRI, TOXMAP, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, IRIS, and more.

    Discovering TOXNET®

    Discovering TOXNET® Picture

Breaking News: Zika Virus MeSH Terms Just Added

Every few years or so an emerging, important topic necessitates MeSH changes outside of Year End Processing. It is happening this year with the addition of  Zika virus. On Monday January 25, 2016 the MeSH Section at the National Library of Medicine added 2 new MeSH Headings to the current 2016 MeSH.

mosquito

Mosquito in biting position

The 2 new MeSH Headings are:
1)      Zika Virus Infection (with an Entry Term of Zika Fever)
2)      Zika Virus

Remember that the terms won’t retrieve any citations until they are applied to MEDLINE records by indexers, but NLM WILL be doing some retrospective indexing, which highly unusual —  ONLY done in these types of situations. The Index Section will review citations indexed in the past to see if any of these citations need to be re-indexed to include the new terms.

Read the NLM Technical Bulletin article here:
https://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/jf16/jf16_zika.html

View materials about the virus: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/

MeSH Webinar Recording: 2016 MeSH Highlights

On January 20, 2016, NLM staff provided a highlights tour of the 2016 Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). A 30-minute presentation featured a MeSH tree clean-up project; a new Clinical Study publication type; changes to the trees for diet, food and nutrition; restructuring in pharmacology and toxicology; and new terms in psychology and health care. Following the presentation, Indexing, MeSH, and PubMed searching experts answered user questions.

You can find the recording here: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/disted/clinics/mesh_2016.html

MeSH Highlights

For more information about 2016 MeSH, see What’s New for 2016 MeSH and the Introduction to MeSH – 2016.

Training the Trainers at the U

Training. It’s what we do at the National Library of Medicine Training Center. Although we spend a great deal of time training librarians and others around the United States, we also realize the importance of opportunities to learn and develop by attending training ourselves.

Systematic Reviews have begun to take a prominent place in the discussion and work of many academic and health sciences librarians. For these reasons, the University of Utah has invited Joseph Nicholson, Coordinator for Systematic Reviews Services at the New York University Academy of Medicine, Health Sciences Library, to provide an in-depth session with case studies, practical exercises and expertise for Eccles Health Sciences Library, NN/LM MCR staff, and NN/LM NTC staff.

The all-day event will take place on January 25, 2016 at the Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah.

Eccles graphic

MedlinePlus Now on Facebook

The National Library of Medicine has launched MedlinePlus Facebook pages. You can find them at https://facebook.com/mplus.gov (English) and https://facebook.com/medlineplusenespanol (Spanish).

MedlinePlus on Facebook

Adults Seeking Health Information Online

More and more U.S. adults are turning to the Internet for health information. A recent graph published in MMWR by the CDC shows that during 2012-2014, 33-49% of adults reported looking up health information on the Internet during the previous 12 months. The percentage was highest among adult residents of large fringe metropolitan counties and lowest among adult residents of rural counties. Where did people go to find this information? According to the Pew Research Center, “73% of all those ages 16 and over say libraries contribute to people finding the health information they need.” There is little question that librarians of all types will continue to play a role in helping to connect users to the health information they desire.

Your Regional Medical Library is a great source of ideas and training on how to help your users locate the authoritative information they need through National Library of Medicine resources and databases. And, the National Library of Medicine Training Center provides in-person and online training to keep your knowledge and skills up-to-date. Check out the calendar of upcoming training events you might be able to take advantage of in the new year. A number of self-paced tutorials and recordings from selected training sessions, including PubMed and TOXNET, and also available. Man with laptop drinking coffee in a cafe

Show Me the MeSH Terms

Watch this short video to learn how to setup an alert to follow a single citation and get notified when MeSH terms are applied.

An early holiday gift from the National Library of Medicine!

SIS app Bohr Thru You may know that the National Library of Medicine (NLM) has a number of resources related to environmental health and toxicology, including the suite of databases which are included as a part of TOXNET. NLM also has a number of resources on these topics which are specifically designed for the K-12 audience and the teachers and parents who work with these students. NLM’s Division of Specialized Information Services (SIS) is pleased to announce the launch of three interactive, educational iOS apps for middle and high school students studying biology, chemistry and environmental health.

These FREE, readily accessible resources assist students with grasping concepts such as DNA base pairing, the Bohr model of the atom and environmental conservation. Two of the iOS apps, Bohr Thru and Base Chase, were developed in collaboration with a high school educator and are easily usable within the biology/chemistry classroom setting. The third game, Run4Green, is a fun and informative learning tool that reinforces concepts relating to environmental conservation and can be used as an engagement extension activity.

Each of the three iOS games is iPhone, iPad and iPod touch compatible, and can be freely downloaded (with no in-game purchases) by visiting the iTunes App Store. Bohr Thru is a Candy Crush style game which requires players to collect and organize protons, neutrons, and electrons in order to form the Bohr Model of the first 18 elements in the Periodic Table. Base Chase allows players to grab bases of DNA in order to complete unique DNA stands for a variety of animals. This game compliments the GeneEd website. Run4Green is especially designed for grades 5-8 and reinforces environmental topics such as greenhouse gas reduction, renewable energies, and green product purchases.

How to Handle the 3rd Degree

I recently attended an all-day workshop presented by Pinnacle Performance Company. They work with high-profile presenters (and me) to perfect their presentation techniques. Here are three tips for handling audience questions:

1) Make certain you’re ready to answer. Avoid verbal viruses (ex. um), especially when beginning an answer. If you need time to think or get your thoughts in order, repeating the question can buy valuable time.

2) Don’t tackle questions for which you don’t have an answer. There’s nothing wrong with admitting you don’t know something, as long as you pledge to research the answer and provide a timetable for providing it.

3) Use your audience, a.k.a. crowd sourcing. Soliciting other opinions and feedback is a great way to facilitate discussion and take the heat off you for a bit. This is obviously not something you can do for every question, and you have to know when to take the focus back, but it can really pay off.

Face2Face: Using Social Media in Libraries

social media iconsFor some time now, libraries and librarians of all types and stripes have been utilizing a variety of social media platforms for a variety of purposes. This past week I had the opportunity to attend the Library Marketing and Communications Conference, where David Lee King was a keynote speaker on the topic: “Face2Face: Social Media for Customer Connections.”

Here are a few of my takeaways from that presentation, which I hope may also give you some things to consider as you develop and implement social media within your own library.

  • Think of the library’s website as the “digital branch” of the library.
  • Just because they’re all there doesn’t mean we should be there. (That is, don’t be compelled to have a presence on a particular social media platform just because everyone else seems to be using it.)
  • Listen – and respond – to what is being said on social media: who is saying it, what they are saying, and where they are saying it. If comments are directed specifically to you (or your library), listen carefully first. If your “critics” are speaking, silence may be the best response. And, don’t forget to say thank you when appropriate.
  • Communication in an online environment should use a conversational writing style – think “business casual.” Aim to sound friendly but professional at the same time. “Type like you talk.” And, use images and/or video whenever possible.
  • Think of social media as a community. Just start talking in the online environment: ask questions, listen, and respond.
  • Consider Twitter for: “What is happening now?” and Facebook for “What just happened?” That is, a different focus for different platforms.
  • Above all – have a plan! Set goals and a strategy and measure your success!

If you’re interested in more on this topic, David Lee King has also published a book on this topic.

Photo credit: www.graphicdesignsinspiration.com

2016 MeSH: This is what the future looks like

The default year in the MeSH Browser (the browser versus the database many of us use each day) remains 2015 MeSH for now, but there is an alternate link that provides access to 2016 MeSH.

Access to two years of MeSH vocabulary is always available in the MeSH Browser, the current year and an alternate year. Sometime in November or December, the default year will change to 2016 MeSH and the alternate link to the 2015 MeSH.

More updates and download information about 2016 MeSH are forthcoming. Subscribe to the NLM Technical Bulletin here.

2016 MeSH Browser