Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About NTC | Contact NTC | NTC Feedback |NTC Sitemap | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for the ‘Training Tips’ Category

An entertaining and helpful slide show re: presentation tips

Monday, September 7th, 2015

Here’s the direct URL to the presentation by Ian Trimble:

2015 Horizon Report – Library Edition

Friday, September 4th, 2015

If you are interested in the trends accelerating technology adoption in academic and research libraries, challenges impeding technology adoption in academic and research libraries, and important developments in technology for academic and research libraries, check out the 2015 Library edition of the Horizon Report.

The report seeks to answer questions such as: What is on the five-year horizon for academic and research libraries worldwide? Which trends and technologies will drive change? What are the challenges that we consider as solvable or difficult to overcome, and how can we strategize effective solutions? These questions and similar inquiries regarding technology adoption and transforming teaching and learning steered the collaborative research and discussions of a body of 53 experts to produce the NMC [New Media Consortium] Horizon Report: 2015 Library Edition.
Read about what the experts consider to be the long-term trends and challenges that will likely impact changes in libraries around the world for the next five years.

Running a Webinar or Online Meeting? Here’s a Checklist

Monday, April 20th, 2015

We’ve all attended good online meetings and bad online meetings. What qualities make for a good online meeting? Here is a short list of suggestions on how to run a successful online session.

  • Use a slide to let people know they’re in the right place
  • Acknowledge that people have arrived
  • Open up a “question of the day”. Nothing difficult; just something to engage and focus people while they’re waiting for the “show” to begin
  • Mute all participants. Yes, we want attendees to ask questions and make comments. No, we don’t want to hear papers rustling or conversations with co-workers who stop by to visit
  • Explain how to unmute
  • Orient participants to the interface and tools
  • To quote the Rolling Stones: “We all need someone we can lean on.” Arrange for someone to work with participants who are having trouble with audio, to read questions from the chat box, to start and stop the recording, etc.

And…in case you haven’t seen the video that depicts common online webinar frustrations as portrayed in an in-person meeting, you can watch the 4 minute video below. Very funny and too true.

Why Tell Stories

Wednesday, March 25th, 2015

Chalkboard with What's Your Story

Take a minute and think of a story that inspired you. Maybe it changed your mind about something, spurred you to action, or just made you think. Don’t you hope your classes do the same for students?

We often hear about the importance of using stories to in classes to engage students and improve understanding, but let’s take a look at a few reasons why stories work.

Stories help us connect emotionally with our students, and when we do that, our students are primed to believe us.
Stories sharpen our curiosity. If you’re reading a good story, you want to continue reading and find out what happens next. The same is true for learners. A student trying to predict the next event is more engaged in learning.
Stories give relevance and context to the lessons, which helps students identify what’s in it for them.
Stories make complex concepts easier to understand by demonstrating what learners should do.
Stories are easier to process. Since you learned to read you’ve been making sense of stories, but you’ve had to learn to process graphs and charts.

To learn more about why stories work, check out this publication from SHIFT elearning.

What We’re Reading: February Edition

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015

It’s tough to keep up with new and interesting articles, blog posts and resources, but here are a few things that have caught our attention lately.



In Case You Missed It

Wednesday, February 4th, 2015

Here are some of the most popular links we shared on Twitter in the last few months. You can follow us on Twitter (@nnlmntc) for even more tips on NLM resources, teaching or training, presentations, and more.


Wednesday, January 28th, 2015

Housekeeping details at the beginning of a class can seem a bit boring, but covering them is an important step in making your audience comfortable, especially if the training is more than an hour. So what should you include to make sure the basics are covered?

1. The Schedule: When does the training begin and end? When are the breaks? Is there a lunch break? How long is it? Knowing the schedule allows students to concentrate on the class. They’ll know when is the best time to get coffee, make a call, or attend to personal needs and may be less likely to step out of the classroom and miss an important concept.

2. Restrooms: Always include the location of the nearest restrooms, especially if participants are not familiar with the location.

3. Questions: Encourage your students to ask questions along the way. This gives you the opportunity to clear up misconceptions or fill in gaps right away, and allows the learner to move forward in the class.

For more ideas on what to include in your housekeeping details, visit the Langevin Learning blog.

Welcome to the (Virtual) Class

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

Welcome Door Mat

Are you adding virtual classes to your teaching repertoire? When starting to teach online, you might miss some of the face-to-face interaction that you’ve previously enjoyed with your students. Building rapport in the online classroom doesn’t have to be all that different than traditional instruction. Here a few things you can do to create a friendly environment online, even if you might not be able to share your warm smile with your class participants.

  • Welcome students as they enter the room, by name if possible.
  • Conduct a brief warm-up activity. The warm-up can familiarize students with the conferencing software, draw on pre-course readings, or help participants get to know each other.
  • Show enthusiasm and excitement for the class using your voice or feedback icons.

For additional tips, see this short checklist from Langevin Learning Services.

Sticky Teaching

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

How do you take advantage of the way the brain works to make what you’re teaching stick? Check out this short SlideShare from Chris Lema on The ABC’s of Sticky Teaching.

Writing for the Ear

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

Recently, I downloaded a copy of No More Spilled Ink: Writing for Instructional Design by Connie Malamed. I recommend the free resource as a great guide if you’re writing content for any kind of online learning.

One section of the guide addresses writing audio scripts, and I thought I’d share a few of Malamed’s tips here, and use them to evaluate an audio script that I recently wrote for a short tutorial.

  • Tip 1: Write like you speak. This means using short sentences, everyday words, and contractions.
  • Tip 2: Keep it brief. Consider how much your audience can process at once and avoid overloading them.
  • Tip 3: Repeat key points. Use emphasis or new wording to help the learner understand.
  • Tip 4: Notate silence. A pause give learners processing time and keeps you from rushing.

So how does my script measure up?

I think my script sounds pretty close to my natural language. I’ve used contractions, such as “let’s” and “don’t”, my sentences are relatively short and straightforward. I have incorporated a few words of jargon, so I’ll review to make sure that they make sense to my intended audience. The script is brief (about 2 minutes) because I narrowed the topic ahead of time. I was tempted to explain a much larger concept, but decided to keep it tightly focused. However, I did not use any of my time to repeat key points. As I revise, I’ll consider adding a sentence that summarizes the take-home message. Finally, notating silence. I’ve never done this before, but I think it’s a great tip because I often find myself speaking more quickly than I would with a face-to-face audience. I seem to forget to pause and breathe, so I think putting the breaks in the script will help me find a more relaxed rhythm.

Check out the full version of the guide for more great tips!