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Archive for the ‘Teaching Technologies’ Category

Andra…What?

Monday, May 9th, 2016

Anyone who has done teaching or taken classes in teaching methods has likely heard the term “pedagogy.” This term is most widely used currently to mean “the art and science … of teaching,” although the original meaning was actually more specific to teaching children. As librarians, we strive to create instructional materials that are appropriate for the learning needs of our students. For this reason, andragogy may be a better alternative and approach, especially for adult and online learners.

Andragogy as a methodology has its roots as far back as 1833 with a German teacher named Alexander Kapp, although its current usage is attributed to Malcolm Knowles, who adopted the word to describe the differences in the ways individuals – especially adults – learn.

Pedagogy and andragogy are very different teaching models. For example, pedagogy is considered a content model, whereas andragogy is a process model. The process model aims to provide the skills and resources needed to acquire information, rather than simply presenting information. Andragogy encourages the teacher as facilitator, where the emphasis in on enabling the student to learn. For adult learners and online students, andragogy may provide a more suitable teaching model. And, with the increasing tendency toward online classes, students are increasingly self-directed.

This table illustrates key differences between pedagogical and andragogical design.

Pedagogy vs Andragogy
It should be noted that these two methods are not mutually exclusive. It is always up to the the teacher or facilitator to determine the best approach for his or her students.

For more information, please see the full article, “Keeping Up With … Andragogy”

Try the new Q&A Feature in Google Slides for Engagement

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Have you tried Google Slides? I don’t use it on a regular basis, but I just learned about a new feature called Q & A. Q&A is designed to let audience members ask questions during a presentation (anonymously, if they prefer).

What’s so novel about that you ask? Students use their smartphone or other smart device to submit questions to the instructor at any point. OK, but what else can Q & A do? As questions are submitted via a shared URL, students “like” questions that they what to know the answer to. The instructor sees, in real-time, which questions are most important to the audience.

What are some ways to use the Q & A feature in Google Slides?

  • Can be used for in-person and online sessions
  • Fosters inclusion for remote participants
  • Students can ask questions when they come to mind
  • Gauge knowledge; Who knows what in the “room”?
  • Use instead of traditional chat box as a way to moderate chat
  • Meets users where they are, their smart-devices
  • Audience size doesn’t inhibit participation

Here’s a short video by Richard Byrne on how to use the tool. 

February 17 is Digital Learning Day #DLD

Wednesday, February 17th, 2016

The National Training Center (NTC) is all about training and learning. We use a variety of methods to provide training related to National Library of Medicine products and services. And, we strive to provide leadership to the NN/LM related to e-learning delivery methods and instructional best practices for adult learners. Today we celebrate Digital Learning Day #DLD! This event, now in its fifth year, is sponsored by the Alliance for Excellent Education, and offers educators (and students) an opportunity to reflect and tell the story about how digital tools are empowering learning in classrooms, schools, homes, and communities.

Based on feedback from our own evaluations, we have a sense that these online training courses and webinars have been beneficial to you in your work. One of the ways to celebrate #DLD is to tell the story of how you have benefited from digital learning environments. While much of the focus of #DLD is around K-12 schools and learning, we know that increasing numbers of adult learners are taking advantage of digital learning opportunities through webinars, twitter chats, Google hangouts, MOOCs, and more.

To participate in a Digital Learning Day activity, learn more, or tell your own story visit the Edutopia or Digital Learning Day website. Or, join in on some of the conversation via Twitter, using #DLD or #DigitalLearningDay. Digital Learning Day 2016

5 Learning Tech Trends to Watch in the Next 5 Years

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

LittleTWTBecause we’re all about training, we try to keep up with what professionals in the areas of learning, training, and technologies are saying. This week,in the Learning Technologies Blog from ATD (Association for Talent Development), Karl M. Kapp identified “a list of five trends learning professionals should consider when mapping out strategies for the next five of years.”

According to Kapp, “When mapping out learning strategies for your organization, you need to carefully consider the elements of technology, learning science, and societal influences to ensure that you have a strategy that is on target, scalable, and meets the needs of your learners to help them achieve organizational goals and objectives.” Here’s a brief look at the top five he identifies:

  1. Microlearning: delivering content to learners in small, specific bursts over time or just when needed.
  2. Gamification: the goal is engagement of learners, not just trying to make things “fun.”
  3. Social Learning: critical for exchanging ideas and getting questions answered from people you’ve never met.
  4. Adaptive Learning: instruction that adapts and changes based on individual learner inputs and actions.
  5. Immersive Learning: different facets of the same concept which make learning more immersive.

To read the full article, go to: http://ow.ly/XWKvc

Using Padlet as an Engagement Tool – Write on my Wall

Monday, October 5th, 2015

I have posted about Padlet before, but I wanted to revisit the tool because…I like it! Here’s a video to get you started:

You can write on my wall (it’s anonymous). Here’s a Padlet I made to crowd source a question. Double click to contribute now.

Top 100 Tools for Learning 2015

Wednesday, September 30th, 2015
top-100-tools-for-learning-2015-1-638NTC staff follow a number of blogs, online forums, listservs, and Twitter feeds related to learning and instruction. Jane Hart is a well-regarded international speaker and writer on modern approaches to workplace learning. Jane is the also the Founder of the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies (C4LPT), one of the world’s most visited learning sites on the Web, where she also compiles the very popular annual Top 100 Tools for Learning list from the votes of learning professionals worldwide.  Her blog, Learning in the Social Workplace, was recently rated top of the 50 most socially shared Learning and Development blogs.

Recently, the blog published the Top 100 Tools for Learning for 2015. For the seventh year running Twitter is the Number 1 tool on the list, although this year it is very closely followed by YouTube, and, once again, the list is dominated by free online tools and services. Jane observes, “I can also see some interesting new trends in the tools that are being used for both personal learning and for creating learning content and experiences for others.”

Some “Big Movers” on the 2015 list – moved up sixteen or more places – including Skype, OneNote, SharePoint, and Kahoot. To read the full blog post, including the complete presentation of the 2015 list, visit:Top 100 Tools for Learning 2015.

2015 Horizon Report – Library Edition

Friday, September 4th, 2015

If you are interested in the trends accelerating technology adoption in academic and research libraries, challenges impeding technology adoption in academic and research libraries, and important developments in technology for academic and research libraries, check out the 2015 Library edition of the Horizon Report.

The report seeks to answer questions such as: What is on the five-year horizon for academic and research libraries worldwide? Which trends and technologies will drive change? What are the challenges that we consider as solvable or difficult to overcome, and how can we strategize effective solutions? These questions and similar inquiries regarding technology adoption and transforming teaching and learning steered the collaborative research and discussions of a body of 53 experts to produce the NMC [New Media Consortium] Horizon Report: 2015 Library Edition.
Read about what the experts consider to be the long-term trends and challenges that will likely impact changes in libraries around the world for the next five years.

Back to the past with Plickers

Monday, August 10th, 2015

I recently attended a conference called the Summer Institute of Distance Learning and Instructional Technology (SIDLIT…pronounced Side Light). In years gone by I have been a fan of using clickers in the classroom as a way to engage and assess students, but you have to have the devices and they cost money.  Enter Plickers or paper clickers. Plickers work with a free app on your iPhone or Android smart phone. Print the cards, hand them out to students and then display your question to the class. Students hold up the paper card with the letter of their answer on top. I was student #18 and I answered C in the image below. Then, the instructor walks around the class scanning the cards. This works best with a small group and goes quite fast. Real-time results are displayed to the class.

Find more information here: https://www.plickers.com/

Plickers

Paper Clickers AKA Plickers

Do you Annotate?

Monday, March 23rd, 2015

If you have videos that you’ve made and uploaded to your YouTube account, then you have access to the annotation tool. Here is a 5 minute video that demonstrates how to add annotations, speech bubbles, callouts and links to other videos from within your completed video.

Do You Padlet?

Monday, March 16th, 2015

Padlet is a cool tool that can be used for instruction. Basically, it is a blank wall and you can decide what you want to “hang” on it. You can use Padlet to: take notes, solicit feedback, as a discussion board or any other thing where you want some sort of input from others.

I made two Padlets to demonstrate different uses. Here’s a padlet that I used as a forum for people to introduce themselves: http://padlet.com/rebeccaleon/aboutme Here’s another Padlet I made based on the video in this post. If you don’t like the chaos of letting people write anywhere they want on the wall, you can make columns, as seen here: http://padlet.com/RebeccaLeon/psr Here is the 4 minute video that shows you how to make columns in Padlet:

You can find Padlet here: https://padlet.com/ It’s free!