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Archive for the ‘PowerPoint’ Category

Survey Results: Which Slide Do You Prefer?

Friday, September 13th, 2013

On August 29th I asked you which one of two PowerPoint slide designs you preferred. Below are the results as of September 12th.  You can click on the image to make it larger. White text on a blue background won by a very slim margin.

surveyresults

Which Slide Do you Prefer?

Thursday, August 29th, 2013

Which slide do you prefer? Click on the image to make it larger.

sidbysidecomparison

Both Sides

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

I’ve been on both sides of the equation. I have wanted to use the fast-forward button to skip to a certain part of a presentation and I imagine that some people have wanted to use the fast-forward button on me. What am I talking about? Keep reading!

In a recent post by Tony Burns on the Speaking about Presenting blog [www.speakingaboutpresenting.com], Tony asks the question: “Does your audience want to fast forward you?” Do people want you to skip to the good stuff, the meat of the information and leave out the rest?

Here are 3 suggestions so people don’t want to press the fast-forward button on your presentation:

  1. Don’t give too much background in the beginning.
  2. Not everything is rocket science. Don’t spend a lot of time on the easy stuff.
  3. People know the problem. They want solutions. Try to give them what they want.

Read the full post at: www.speakingaboutpresenting.com/content/audience-fast-forward/

I’ve Got a Question…20 of them

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

The University of Minnesota’s Center for Teaching and Learning has created a page dedicated to using games in the classroom. Below is one example that can be used in-person or online as an ice breaker or a review.

http://www1.umn.edu/ohr/teachlearn/tutorials/powerpoint/games/index.html#twenty

Heard on the Digital Street

Monday, December 17th, 2012

I recently attended a free webinar by PowerPoint makeover guru Rick Altman. Here are some of the notes I took:

  • Put the needs of your audience first.
  • Don’t include these slides:
      •  About us
      • Mission Statement
  • Slides should compliment/enhance the message.
  • Share your ideas; don’t explain your slides.
  • Remember phone booths? Remember seeing pictures of people trying to cram as many people as possible into a phone booth? Is your slide like that phone booth…crammed with information? You’re not going to get any contents for that.
  • Nobody goes to a presentation to see your slides. They come for your expertise. Don’t make your slides more important than yourself.
  • They come for you, but make it about them.
  • Ask yourself: if the projector blew up, could you give your presentation without your slides?
  • Three things that make a good presentation (these should all be different from each other):

1. What you say.
2. What you show.
3. What you give to the audience.

  • Asked: What is your biggest complaint about PowerPoint slides. Answered: Too much text on slides.
  • Try to make each bullet point 3 words or less (unlike this bullet point).
  • Problem:You want your slides to do double duty; to be the visual component for a presentation and a handout. The purposes are disparate. Create 2 different documents.
  • Say it first, and then show it.
  • You can follow Rick Altman on Twitter (@rickaltman)

Just a Suggestion

Wednesday, October 17th, 2012

From a post by Tom Mucciolo on the Indezine blog.

Designing to the Delivery

“Imagine a presenter who is challenged by verbal fillers (ums, uhs) when trying to paraphrase text, giving the appearance of nervousness. A slide designer could create more graphic images, data-driven charts, perhaps interspersed video, to allow the speaker to “talk around” the visual imagery (cues) with little or no text on the screen.”

The described approach will only work if the presenter knows the material well. Instead of reading a slide, create a visually rich slide that has all the information the speaker needs to convey a message. Less is more.

Read the full post called Slides and Speakers at: http://blog.indezine.com/2012/10/slides-and-speakers-by-tom-mucciolo.html

What We Learned in “School”: Stories from Three Training and Learning Conferences

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Join the National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) trainers as they share “aha moments,” tips, techniques and research-based recommendations from three recent professional development conferences.  We will discuss:

  • Presentation skills, including better PowerPoint design
  • Tips for creating participant-centered training activities
  • Distance learning recommendations

Date:  November 7, 2012

Time:  3 – 4 pm ET

Place:  Adobe Connect; web address will be sent to registrants

Register herehttp://nnlm.gov/ntcc/classes/schedule.html#class501

Don’t Let this be Your Presentation

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012

A very humorous (and sad) look at PowerPoint presentations.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rIABo0d9MVE&feature=player_embedded

Atomic PowerPoint

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Think small; One idea per slide. Read a short blog post about how less is more when it comes to developing PowerPoint slides.

http://evereval.wordpress.com/2011/11/27/atomic-slide-development/

Three presentation lessons from Laura Bergells’ MANIACTIVE Blog

Friday, August 10th, 2012
  1. The unexpected will rivet audience attention. Breaking a pattern is a very basic way to grab attention.
  2. Be careful with negative instructions. If you don’t want your audience to do something, don’t even put the idea into their heads.
  3. Take words seriously. If you want the audience to take your words seriously, make your font size huge and clearly visible.

You can read more ideas from Laura Bergells at: http://maniactive.com/blog/