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Archive for the ‘National Library of Medicine’ Category

An Oldie, but Goodie. MeSH, the Movie.

Monday, February 9th, 2015

This 11-minute video is an introduction to the development, structure and use of the MeSH® vocabulary. The video may be of particular interest to searchers of MEDLINE®/PubMed®, and is used in the PubMed search classes offered by NLM and the National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC).

Branching Out: The MeSH Vocabulary

In Case You Missed It

Wednesday, February 4th, 2015

Here are some of the most popular links we shared on Twitter in the last few months. You can follow us on Twitter (@nnlmntc) for even more tips on NLM resources, teaching or training, presentations, and more.

There’s a Permalink for That!

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

TOXNET now includes a feature for many of the databases that are part of the TOXNET suite which allows you to share a permanent link to a particular record.

View a 49 second video to see a demo of the new feature.
To watch the video in HD, click on the gear that appears below the video once you start to watch and then choose the HD option.

2015 MeSH Now Available in PubMed

Monday, December 15th, 2014

As of December 15, PubMed/MEDLINE citations (including the backlog of citations indexed since November 19 with 2015 MeSH), the MeSH database, and the NLM Catalog were updated to reflect 2015 MeSH.

The MeSH translation tables were also updated on December 15. Now that end-of-year activities are complete, MEDLINE/PubMed may be searched using 2015 MeSH vocabulary, however, don’t be surprised if your search comes up empty. It will take a little bit of time for Indexers to begin to use the new terms.  For example, the term Courage was added to MeSH for 2015, but it has yet to be applied to a citation.

This link will show you the details for all MeSH data changes made for 2015. Scroll down to item #4 and look at the list of new descriptors/MeSH headings.

On December 16th, NLM will resume daily MEDLINE updates to PubMed (they’ve been on hold due to year-end-processing).

Are you a Subscriber? NLM Technical Bulletin

Monday, November 24th, 2014

The NLM Technical Bulletin, produced by the National Library of Medicine, is your source for the latest PubMed changes and searching information. You can sign up for email updates or an RSS Feed. Be the first kid on the block to know!


Make Friends with MeSH

Monday, November 10th, 2014

Where do you start your searches? There are many options. Watch this 3 minute video to learn how to build a search from within the MeSH database.

Dates in MeSH

Wednesday, November 5th, 2014

This video answers one of the most common questions we hear about MeSH: what do the dates mean?

Take a look, and if you’d like to learn more, check out the MeSH tutorial from the National Library of Medicine.


Health Information in Many Languages

Monday, October 27th, 2014

The Refugee Health Information Network (RHIN) was a national collaborative partnership whose principal focus was to create and make available a database of quality multilingual/multicultural, public health resources to professionals providing care to resettled refugees and asylees.


In October 2014, the Specialized Information Services division of NLM broadened the scope of RHIN by rebranding it HealthReach (You’ll notice that the website moved from a .org to a .gov URL). This was done to better meet the needs of the diverse non-English and English as a second language speaking audiences.

HealthReach continues to recognize the importance of providing refugee and asylee specific information while expanding the information provided to meet the needs of most immigrant populations. Over the next several months we will be adding new resources and reaching out to stakeholders.

You can follow the new resource on Twitter: @NLM_HealthReach

You can find the new website at:

MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing Activities for 2014

Monday, October 20th, 2014

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is currently involved in MEDLINE year-end processing (YEP) activities. These include changing the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) main headings as well as Supplementary Concept Records that standardize names and associated numbers for chemical, protocols, and diseases that are not main headings. The MeSH edits include existing MEDLINE citations to conform with the 2015 version of MeSH, and other global changes.

Important Dates:

November 19, 2014: NLM expects to temporarily suspend the addition of fully-indexed MEDLINE citations to PubMed. Publisher-supplied and in process citations will continue to be added.

Mid-December 2014: PubMed MEDLINE citations, translation tables, and the MeSH database will have been updated to reflect 2015 MeSH.

For details about the impact on searching from November 20 to mid-December, see: Annual MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing (YEP): Impact on Searching During Fall 2014.

For background information on the general kinds of changes made annually, see: Annual MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing (YEP): Background Information.

Keeping up with the National Library of Medicine

Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

One question we’re often asked in our classes is how to keep up with changes to PubMed and other NLM Resources. There are lots of changes, but there are several resources as well. Whether your interest is PubMed, History of Medicine, disaster medicine, or NCBI databases, you can find a blog, Facebook page, Twitter account, or even Pinterest board to follow. For the full list of ways to connect with NLM, see their social media page.

In addition to the NLM accounts, you can also follow the social media of your National Network of Libraries of Medicine Region or one of the Centers (like us, the National Library of Medicine Training Center).

Finally, we always recommend subscribing to the National Library of Medicine Technical Bulletin. You can be among the first to know about changes to PubMed and other important information that may impact your use of NLM resources. They also have a searchable archive that can be useful for finding when particular changes occurred. For example, you can search for “bolded” to learn that PubMed began making your search terms appear in bold in 2011.