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Archive for the ‘In-Person Classes’ Category

In Case You Missed It

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

Our blog is just one way we like to connect with you! We also have Twitter and Facebook accounts. Here are some of our most popular posts from the past few months:

Library Entrance at OHSU

Tips for Class Discussions

Wednesday, September 10th, 2014

Thinking of incorporating discussion into your next class? Here are a few tips to consider as you develop your lesson plan.

two men and two women seated in a discussion

  • Target the discussion. You should have a well-defined topic or outcome for the discussion. Do you want them to come to a consensus about something? Produce a list of advantages and disadvantages? Whatever the purpose, having a clear focus will help keep the learners on track during the conversation.
  • Put a time limit on the discussion. A timeframe communicates to learners how long they have to discuss their ideas and may help avoid having one or two folks monopolize the discourse. Be sure to set the time expectation at the beginning, and if warranted, you can post a timer or have someone in the group be the timekeeper.
  • Consider the environment. What is the seating arrangement? Does it allow for easy exchange of ideas in small or large groups? Will everyone be able to hear? Do groups need space to discuss privately?
  • Consider the group size. Are you having a whole class discussion? Or will the learners be broken into smaller groups? Sharing ideas in a small group first can be less intimidating and help the salient points to be shared in a larger discussion. Groups of 3 or 4 tend to allow for all voices to be heard.
  • Develop learning materials. Depending on the discussion, your groups may or may not need any supporting materials. You might use a picture or slide to generate discussion, have a recording sheet, or supply data for the group to discuss. Make sure the materials are easily accessible for all in the group.

Training Materials for PubMed, MeSH, My NCBI, and LinkOut

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

Do you teach others about PubMed? Did you know that the National Library of Medicine has a resource page of PubMed instructional materials? The next time you’re building a class or helping a user, instead of reinventing the wheel (or the tutorial), check to see if one already exists. The resources on this page include pamphlets, handouts, slides, and videos and can be reused and adapted for your own training.

Screen capture table of MeSH materials on linked PubMed Instructional materials page

Have an idea for a different topic or format? You can contact NLM (see the link on the above website) or the NTC.

Assessment on the Fly

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

With just an hour of classroom time (or less!) how can you fit in assessment? How can you tell if your students have gained the skill you’ve taught or understand a critical concept?

Rubric showing ratings of 5 to 1 with eyeglasses in upper left corner

TeachThought had a recent blog post detailing several assessment strategies, and I thought I’d share a few here.

1. Ticket out the door: Have students write the answer to a question, an a-ha moment or lingering question on a scrap of paper or sticky note and collect them on the way out the door to a break or to leave. This is a quick way to see what stood out to the class and one we’ve used here at the NTC.

2. Ask students to reflect: Before class ends, have students jot down what they learned or how they will apply it in the future.

3. Misconception check: Describe a common misconception about the concept you’re teaching, or show an example of something done incorrectly. Ask students to identify and correct the problem.

4. Peer instruction: Ask a question and have students pair-up and explain the correct answer and why to their partner. Walk around and listen to their responses to assess whether the concept needs to be revisited.

To see the rest of the list of simple assessments you can try, see the blog on TeachThought.

Poll: How do you offer training?

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014

Tell us how you offer training or teach classes with this short poll.

Create your free online surveys with SurveyMonkey , the world’s leading questionnaire tool.

New Class Dates Announced!

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

LittlePMT

Have you heard? We’ve recently announced new class dates for our PubMed for Trainers and PubMed for Librarians classes!

PubMed for Trainers is designed for those who train or will train others to use PubMed. There are 3 online classes followed by an all-day in-person class. Completing the class earns you 15 MLA CE credits and it’s free!

Upcoming classes:

  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – June 2014
  • Bethesdsa, Maryland – June 2014
  • Lincoln, Rhode Island – June 2014
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota – July 2014
  • Portland, Oregon – September 2014
  • Bethesda, Maryland – October 2014

For more information on PubMed for Trainers or to register, please visit our class schedule.

PubMed for Librarians is made up of five 90 minute segments. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module and you can determine how many and in what sequence you attend. Classes are free.

The five segments are:

  • Introduction to PubMed
  • MeSH
  • Automatic Term Mapping
  • Building and Refining Your Search
  • Customization – MyNCBI

You can find out more about each segment or register for classes on our training calendar.

Watch for more class announcements soon.

We hope you’ll join us!

 

Get Their Attention with These 3 Steps

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

Group of students paying attention

Don’t you wish that any time you taught, your students were completely captivated by what you had to say?

As teachers and trainers, you know it’s important to grab the audience’s attention right away. Whether you teach busy clinicians, exhausted students, or distracted researchers, getting and keeping the audience’s attention can be a real challenge. So how do you do it?

A recent post over at CopyBlogger describes three steps that you can apply to capture the attention of your students. Their post really addresses blog writing, but I think they can be applied to the classroom as well. By applying these steps, you just might find that you have gained ground in the competition for your audience’s attention.

Step 1: Empathize with your student’s struggle. Show them that you understand their needs and the accompanying challenges. For example, you might indicate that you know how important it is to have the most recent literature for their research, but how difficult it can be to make sure you have the best sources.

Step 2: Promise your students a benefit. Let them know right away how they will be rewarded for their attention and why they should pay attention. Will it take them less time to find what they need? Will they impress their attendings with their ability to find the best evidence?

Step 3: Provide reassurance. Let them know it’s not going to be too hard because you’re going to let them in on a few secrets or a simple trick that will elevate their skill. This really doesn’t have to take long, but by using these steps to slightly revamp your introduction, you may find that you have a more attentive class.

Did you notice any of these steps at work in this post?

 

 

 

Seattle: PubMed® for Trainers

Monday, February 17th, 2014

The National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) is offering the 4 session PubMed for Trainers class at the University of Washington Health Sciences Library.

The series of four classes runs from Thursday, March 6, 2014 – March 27, 2014.

Online Session One: March 6, 2014, 10 am – 12 pm PT

Online Session Two: March 13, 2014 10 am – 12 pm PT

Online Session Three: March 20, 2014 10 am – 12 pm PT

In-person Session Four in Seattle, Washington: March 27, 2014, 9 am – 4:30 pm PT

Click here to view the class description.

Start the Music!

Thursday, January 30th, 2014

Playing music during training?  If you’re never experienced this, it might seem like an odd idea.  I’ve had this experience during some of the training sessions at the Bob Pike annual conference I attended last year.  The instructors played music as people were filtering in to the classroom.  The rationale, as this article discusses, is “to alleviate their tension and create a relaxed learning atmosphere.”  I’m happy to report that it worked!

Other ideas for music in training are to use it for transitioning from one activity to another (in short bits) and to use song parodies to revisit training content.  (If you can sing the exact words to any TV opening credits from your childhood, or sing the words to a French song from the 1970’s when you don’t know any other French, you know how powerful music is as a memory aid!)

Where to find the music?  Look for royalty-free music web sites.  If you try incorporating music into your training, let us know how it worked!

 

Effective Teaching Behaviors

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

What are some effective teaching behaviors that we can incorporate into our classes for learners of all types?  A post from the “Tomorrow’s Professor” mailing list, sponsored by the Stanford Center for Teaching and Learning, discussed eight behaviors to consider.   The behaviors that particularly intrigued me were:

“Teach for Understanding Rather Than Exposure”:  determine the “big ideas” behind the class

“Explicit Instruction”:  Tell students what they are going to learn, the rationale for learning the material, and how new material relates to what they already learned.

Scaffolded Instruction”:  The three stages of scaffolded instruction are:  1) Students watch the teacher perform a task; 2) teacher and student do the task together; 3) student does it alone.

“Errorless Learning”: Present the material using smaller steps so that students can achieve success without errors.

You can read the full article here.