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Feature Slides

  • PubMed ® for Trainers

    Do you train others to use PubMed? If so, join us for PubMed for Trainers, a hybrid class with 3 online sessions and 1 in-person session (eligible for 15 MLA CE credits). The class is an in-depth look at PubMed and a chance to share training ideas with your fellow participants.

    PubMed ® for Trainers

    PubMed ® for Trainers Picture
  • PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed for Librarians is made up of five one-hour segments. These five segments will be presented via Adobe Connect and recorded for archival access. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend.

    PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed® for Librarians Picture
  • Discovering TOXNET®

    Discover TOXNET and other NLM environmental health databases through videos, guided tutorials, and discovery exercises in thirteen independent modules. The independent modules cover TOXLINE, ChemIDplus, TRI, TOXMAP, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, IRIS, and more.

    Discovering TOXNET®

    Discovering TOXNET® Picture

Top 100 Tools for Learning 2015

top-100-tools-for-learning-2015-1-638NTC staff follow a number of blogs, online forums, listservs, and Twitter feeds related to learning and instruction. Jane Hart is a well-regarded international speaker and writer on modern approaches to workplace learning. Jane is the also the Founder of the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies (C4LPT), one of the world’s most visited learning sites on the Web, where she also compiles the very popular annual Top 100 Tools for Learning list from the votes of learning professionals worldwide.  Her blog, Learning in the Social Workplace, was recently rated top of the 50 most socially shared Learning and Development blogs.

Recently, the blog published the Top 100 Tools for Learning for 2015. For the seventh year running Twitter is the Number 1 tool on the list, although this year it is very closely followed by YouTube, and, once again, the list is dominated by free online tools and services. Jane observes, “I can also see some interesting new trends in the tools that are being used for both personal learning and for creating learning content and experiences for others.”

Some “Big Movers” on the 2015 list – moved up sixteen or more places – including Skype, OneNote, SharePoint, and Kahoot. To read the full blog post, including the complete presentation of the 2015 list, visit:Top 100 Tools for Learning 2015.

Create a Biosketch with SciENcv: The Webinar

This 30 minute webinar presented by NCBI shows you how to use SciENcv to maintain your scientific record and generate the new NIH Biosketch.

Opening today: “Confronting Violence, Improving Women’s Lives” from NLM

Confronting VIolence in WomenFor many years, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) has created a wide variety of exhibitions and companion websites to inform the public about issues which also highlight various aspects and elements of NLM’s extensive collections.

NLM has announced the release of another special display and traveling banner exhibition made available free of charge to cultural institutions across the country and an online adaptation of Confronting Violence, Improving Women’s Lives.

Confronting Violence tells a story that is unfamiliar to most. In fact, within the scholarly community, no one has written about this chapter in history. For many, the anti-domestic violence movement came into focus during the 1985 Surgeon General’s Workshop on Violence and Public Health or with the passage of the 1994 Violence Against Women Act. Yet, for years prior, nurse reformers were working on the front lines in shelters and emergency rooms across the country. They conducted studies, analyzed data and developed protocols for identification and treatment of patients who had experienced domestic violence.

Until the late 1970s, medicine as a whole had largely dismissed or failed to acknowledge domestic violence as a significant health issue. Nurses pushed the larger medical community to identify victims of battering, adequately respond to victims’ needs and work towards prevention. Confronting Violence chronicles the experiences of these passionate, persistent nurses, who changed the medical profession and dramatically improved services to victims of domestic violence in the latter half of the 20th century. The work continues today, as individuals from all walks of life and organizations draw upon the lessons of the past to develop innovative and creative approaches to supporting survivors and preventing domestic violence.

The special display will be open to the public in the NLM History of Medicine Division (HMD) Reading Room on the first floor of the National Library of Medicine, September 17, 2015 – August 19, 2016.

An opening program will take place September 17 from 1:00 to 3:00 PM in NLM’s Lister Hill Auditorium. The traveling banner adaptation of Confronting Violence, Improving Women’s Lives will be traveling to 50 sites across the country over the next four years. Please visit the Traveling Exhibition Services Web site to see the tour itinerary and find this exhibition near you.

For more information, see the complete announcement.

Retrieve Chemical Info from HSDB while in PubMed

Set up
1) If you don’t already have a free MyNCBI account, create one
2) At the bottom of the Filters window on your MyNCBI account page, click the “Manage filters” link
3) Click on LinkOut from the “Select Category” option
4) Type in HSDB and click on Search
5) Check the two boxes next to HSDB (filter and icon). This will save these options.

Run a search
1) While logged into your MyNCBI account
2) Run your search in PubMed
3) On the upper right side of the results page look for “Filter your results”
4) Click on the HSDB link. You are now viewing all citations with a link to the HSDB database
5) Click on a result
6) Click on the HSDB icon on the upper right. The link takes you to the HSDB record for chemical/s mentioned in the article.

An entertaining and helpful slide show re: presentation tips

Here’s the direct URL to the presentation by Ian Trimble:

2015 Horizon Report – Library Edition

If you are interested in the trends accelerating technology adoption in academic and research libraries, challenges impeding technology adoption in academic and research libraries, and important developments in technology for academic and research libraries, check out the 2015 Library edition of the Horizon Report.

The report seeks to answer questions such as: What is on the five-year horizon for academic and research libraries worldwide? Which trends and technologies will drive change? What are the challenges that we consider as solvable or difficult to overcome, and how can we strategize effective solutions? These questions and similar inquiries regarding technology adoption and transforming teaching and learning steered the collaborative research and discussions of a body of 53 experts to produce the NMC [New Media Consortium] Horizon Report: 2015 Library Edition.
Read about what the experts consider to be the long-term trends and challenges that will likely impact changes in libraries around the world for the next five years.

Create an alert in PubMed. Get Notified when MeSH terms have been applied.

Watch this short video to learn how to create an alert in PubMed so you can be notified when MeSH terms have been added to an in-process citation.

Use the buttons below the video to turn closed captions off/on or to change the resolution of the video.

SciENcv Updated to Support New NIH Biosketch Format

In November, NIH announced a new format for biographical sketches (aka biosketches); the new format is required for grant applications submitted for due dates after May 24, 2015. SciENcv, a tool available through PubMed’s My NCBI for creating biosketches, has been updated to reflect the format changes and to help users convert their existing NIH biosketches from the old format to the new.

Differences between the old and new NIH Biosketch formats include:

  1. Maximum length increased from 4 to 5 pages
  2. Rearranged data in the table at the top of the Biosketch
  3. Section A, Personal Statement can now include up to 4 supporting citations
  4. Section C is now called “Contribution to Science” and should be comprised of up to 5 brief descriptions of your most significant contributions to science, each with up to 4 supporting citations. In addition,  you may also provide a URL to a full list of your published work as found in a publicly available digital database such as My Bibliography. This section is the most notable difference in the new format.

old and new biosketch

Read all about the changes here

Apply Now for “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” Bioinformatics Course

Group of approximately 20 people standing in front of the National Library of Medicine

Librarians in the United States who specialize in health and related sciences are invited to participate in the next offering of the bioinformatics training course, “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI,” sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, NLM Training Center (NTC).

The course provides knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI. Prior knowledge of molecular biology and genetics is not required. Participating in the Librarian’s Guide course will improve your ability to initiate or extend bioinformatics services at your institution.

Instructors will be NCBI staff and Diane Rein, Ph.D., MLS, Bioinformatics and Molecular Biology Liaison from the Health Science Library, University at Buffalo.

Online Pre-Course and In-Person Course Components
The two parts to “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” are listed below. Applicants must complete both parts. Participants must complete the pre-course with full CE credit (Part 1) in order to advance to attend the 5-day in-person course (Part 2).

  • Part 1: “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching,” an online (asynchronous) course, October 26-December 11, 2015.

The major goal of Part 1 is to provide an introduction to bioinformatics theory and practice in support of developing and implementing library-based bioinformatics products and services. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course encompasses visualizing bioinformatics end-user practice. It places a strong emphasis on hands-on acquisition of NCBI search competencies, and developing a working molecular biology vocabulary through self-paced hands-on exercises.

Other option: Interested in taking only the online version of the “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching” course? Watch for an upcoming second announcement of an offering in January-February 2016.

  • Part 2: A 5-day in-person course offered on-site at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland, March 7-11, 2016.

The focus of the in-person course is on using the BLAST sequence similarity search and Entrez text search systems to find relevant molecular data. The course describes the various kinds of molecular data available and explain how these are generated and used in modern biomedical research. The course is a combination of instruction, demonstration, discussions, and hands-on exercises (both individual and group).

Who can apply?

  • Applications are open to librarians in the United States who specialize in health science or related sciences.
  • Applications will be accepted both from librarians currently providing bioinformatics services as well as from those desiring to implement services.
  • Enrollment is limited 25 participants.

What does it cost?

  • There is no charge for the classes. Travel, lodging and meal costs for the in-person class are at the expense of the participant.

Important Application Dates

  • Application deadline: September 14, 2015
  • Acceptance notification: On or about October 5, 2015

How to Apply

  1. Please fill out the Application Form at
  2. Once you complete the Application Form, you will be directed to download the Supervisor Support Statement ( This is to be filled out and signed by your immediate supervisor. This statement describes your current and/or future role in bioinformatics support at your institution and confirms your availability to attend the course if selected.
  3. Provide your current curriculum vitae (CV). Please use the suggested CV model as a guideline for the type of information desired ( application is not complete until we receive both your CV and the Supervisor Support Statement in addition to the Application Form.

Course Page
The course page with additional information is at:

Please direct any questions to:

Back to the past with Plickers

I recently attended a conference called the Summer Institute of Distance Learning and Instructional Technology (SIDLIT…pronounced Side Light). In years gone by I have been a fan of using clickers in the classroom as a way to engage and assess students, but you have to have the devices and they cost money.  Enter Plickers or paper clickers. Plickers work with a free app on your iPhone or Android smart phone. Print the cards, hand them out to students and then display your question to the class. Students hold up the paper card with the letter of their answer on top. I was student #18 and I answered C in the image below. Then, the instructor walks around the class scanning the cards. This works best with a small group and goes quite fast. Real-time results are displayed to the class.

Find more information here:


Paper Clickers AKA Plickers