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Feature Slides

  • PubMed ® for Trainers

    Do you train others to use PubMed? If so, join us for PubMed for Trainers, a hybrid class with 3 online sessions and 1 in-person session (eligible for 15 MLA CE credits). The class is an in-depth look at PubMed and a chance to share training ideas with your fellow participants.

    PubMed ® for Trainers

    PubMed ® for Trainers Picture
  • Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    The "Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching" course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI.

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics Picture
  • TOXNET® and Beyond

    This course is designed to convey the basics of searching the NLM's TOXNET®, a Web-based system of databases in the areas of toxicology, environmental health, and related fields.

    TOXNET® and Beyond

    TOXNET® and Beyond Picture
  • Teaching with Technology

    Learn how to take advantage of online tools to offer distance education classes and enhance face to face classes! Join us for this "asynchronous" (on your own time) class. The class is taught over 5 weeks and is eligible for 8 MLA CE credits.

    Teaching with Technology

    Teaching with Technology Picture
  • PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed for Librarians is made up of five one-hour segments. These five segments will be presented via Adobe Connect and recorded for archival access. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend.

    PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed® for Librarians Picture

Population Health Query Added to PubMed

NLM just added a new special search query to the Topic-Specific Queries page. The strategy is not limited to U.S.-based articles.

Population Health Search Strategy

Follow this link to view the new search strategy.

The Topic-Specific Queries page can be found from PubMed’s home page. Look for the link in the center column labeled PubMed Tools.

Keep up with all the new features and changes to PubMed by subscribing to the Technical Bulletin.

New LactMed Video

LactMed is part of the suite of TOXNET databases and provides information on drugs and other chemicals to which breastfeeding mothers may be exposed. With the new TOXNET interface, it was also updated. Check out this updated video from the National Library of Medicine to learn more about LactMed.

 

Now Available in Wide Release: Searching the Hazardous Substances Data Bank

A new how-to video called: Basics of Searching the Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB) has been released by SIS featuring the newly updated TOXNET interface.

Tips for Class Discussions

Thinking of incorporating discussion into your next class? Here are a few tips to consider as you develop your lesson plan.

two men and two women seated in a discussion

  • Target the discussion. You should have a well-defined topic or outcome for the discussion. Do you want them to come to a consensus about something? Produce a list of advantages and disadvantages? Whatever the purpose, having a clear focus will help keep the learners on track during the conversation.
  • Put a time limit on the discussion. A timeframe communicates to learners how long they have to discuss their ideas and may help avoid having one or two folks monopolize the discourse. Be sure to set the time expectation at the beginning, and if warranted, you can post a timer or have someone in the group be the timekeeper.
  • Consider the environment. What is the seating arrangement? Does it allow for easy exchange of ideas in small or large groups? Will everyone be able to hear? Do groups need space to discuss privately?
  • Consider the group size. Are you having a whole class discussion? Or will the learners be broken into smaller groups? Sharing ideas in a small group first can be less intimidating and help the salient points to be shared in a larger discussion. Groups of 3 or 4 tend to allow for all voices to be heard.
  • Develop learning materials. Depending on the discussion, your groups may or may not need any supporting materials. You might use a picture or slide to generate discussion, have a recording sheet, or supply data for the group to discuss. Make sure the materials are easily accessible for all in the group.

Do You Like it Chunky? OR How to Chunk

Basics of Content Chunking from Fareeza Marican

You can read more about chunking here: http://ow.ly/APZOD

What We’re Reading

Stack of magazines viewed from corner

 

Summer can  be a great time to catch up on reading. Here are a few things we’ve been reading that you might find interesting or useful too.

What did you read over the summer? Share with us on Facebook or Twitter your favorites!

 

Universal Design for Learning

Have you heard of Universal Design for Learning? At the Annual Conference for Distance Teaching and Learning, I attended a few session with a focus on this principle. Here’s a primer video on Universal Design for Learning that will help you become acquainted. If you want to learn more, check out cast.org

Going to MCMLA 2014? Kill 2 Birds with 1 Stone (metaphorically speaking)

Are you planning on attending the MCMLA Quint Essential meeting in Denver, CO in October 2014? Well guess what? The National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) will be there too. The NTC will be teaching PubMed for Trainers one day after the conference ends. You can attend the conference and then cap off your experience with PubMed for Trainers on October 17th, 2014. Click here to read the details about the 4-part class that includes 3 online sessions and 1 in-person session in Denver and register for the class.

Nine Events of Instruction

In the 1960s, educational psychologist Robert Gagne described what he termed the Nine Events of Instruction. These events are focused on what the teacher or trainer does to facilitate learning. Which of these do you do? Are there any you could add that would improve your class?

1. Gain attention! Hook the learners in with an interesting question or scenario, a video, or something unexpected.
2. Describe the goal. Show students what they’ll gain from the session and what to expect.
3. Stimulate recall of prior knowledge. Show how this new information is connected to something students already know or can do. You can connect to prior knowledge in the same field, or even something from popular culture.
4. Present the material. This is where the bulk of the content is presented. Use questions, interactions, stories, or multimedia to liven it up.
5. Provide guidance for learning. Use leading questions or provide discussion opportunities.
6. Elicit performance. Give the students a chance to apply what they’ve learned and practice the new skills or knowledge.
7. Provide feedback. Allow the learner to evaluate their own performance, give or receive peer feedback, or evaluate their practice.
8. Assess performance. Determine if the goal has been met by evaluating a formal assessment (such as a quiz) or an informal assessment (by observation).
9. Enhance retention and transfer. Have students teach others, provide more opportunities for practice, or transfer knowledge to a new situation.

NLM Activates the Emergency Access Initiative re: Ebola

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) has been activated to support healthcare professionals working on the Ebola public health emergency in West Africa.

The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from over 650 biomedical journals and over 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or supplement for libraries affected by disasters that need to continue to serve medical staff and affiliated users. It is also intended for medical personnel responding to the specified disaster.

EAI is not an open access collection. It is only intended for those affected by the disaster or assisting the affected population. If you know of a library or organization involved in healthcare efforts in response to the Ebola outbreak, please let them know of this service.

EAI has been activated four times in the past, including following the earthquake and subsequent cholera epidemic in Haiti, flooding in Pakistan and the earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

NLM thanks the numerous participating publishers for their generous support of this initiative: American Academy of Pediatrics, American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Chemical Society, American College of Physicians, American Medical Association, American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists, ASM Press, B.C. Decker, BMJ, EBSCOHost, Elsevier, FA Davis, Mary Ann Liebert, Massachusetts Medical Society, McGraw-Hill, Merck Publishing, Oxford University Press, People’s Medical Publishing House, Springer, University of Chicago Press, Wiley and Wolters Kluwer.

Resources on Ebola
NLM has several other resources that will be helpful for people working on Ebola:
• Articles in PubMed: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=ebola
• Ebola (for the general public): http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ebola.html
• International health (for the general public): http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/internationalhealth.html

For questions regarding these resources, please e-mail
custserv@nlm.nih.gov or call 1.888.346.3656 in the United States, or 301.594.5983 internationally.