Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About NTC | Contact NTC | NTC Feedback |NTC Sitemap | Help | Bookmark and Share

Feature Slides

  • PubMed ® for Trainers

    Do you train others to use PubMed? If so, join us for PubMed for Trainers, a hybrid class with 3 online sessions and 1 in-person session (eligible for 15 MLA CE credits). The class is an in-depth look at PubMed and a chance to share training ideas with your fellow participants.

    PubMed ® for Trainers

    PubMed ® for Trainers Picture
  • Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    The "Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching" course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI.

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics Picture
  • TOXNET® and Beyond

    This course is designed to convey the basics of searching the NLM's TOXNET®, a Web-based system of databases in the areas of toxicology, environmental health, and related fields.

    TOXNET® and Beyond

    TOXNET® and Beyond Picture
  • Teaching with Technology

    Learn how to take advantage of online tools to offer distance education classes and enhance face to face classes! Join us for this "asynchronous" (on your own time) class. The class is taught over 5 weeks and is eligible for 8 MLA CE credits.

    Teaching with Technology

    Teaching with Technology Picture
  • PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed for Librarians is made up of five one-hour segments. These five segments will be presented via Adobe Connect and recorded for archival access. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend.

    PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed® for Librarians Picture

NIH Videos

Did you know you can watch thousands of recorded videocasts from the NIH? The videocasts are recorded lectures on a wide variety of topics that you can stream or download. You can tune in to watch lectures on bioethics, health disparities, neuroscience, science education, and more. You can also watch Clinical Center Grand Rounds, lectures from Distinguished Women Scientists, seminars from the NIH Director, or a series on Medicine for the Public. You can  search the archive of recorded events for particular topics or find a list of upcoming events.

Here’s a sample of what you might see looking under the topic Bioethics:

Three descriptions of videocasts with thumbnails

 

This could be a great source to share with researchers you work with or for your own learning!

2015 MeSH Now Available in PubMed

As of December 15, PubMed/MEDLINE citations (including the backlog of citations indexed since November 19 with 2015 MeSH), the MeSH database, and the NLM Catalog were updated to reflect 2015 MeSH.

The MeSH translation tables were also updated on December 15. Now that end-of-year activities are complete, MEDLINE/PubMed may be searched using 2015 MeSH vocabulary, however, don’t be surprised if your search comes up empty. It will take a little bit of time for Indexers to begin to use the new terms.  For example, the term Courage was added to MeSH for 2015, but it has yet to be applied to a citation.

This link will show you the details for all MeSH data changes made for 2015. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/introduction.html Scroll down to item #4 and look at the list of new descriptors/MeSH headings.

On December 16th, NLM will resume daily MEDLINE updates to PubMed (they’ve been on hold due to year-end-processing).

Register (there’s still time) for NCBI Webinar: A Submitter’s Guide to GenBank

On December 17th, NCBI will present a webinar entitled “A Submitter’s Guide to GenBank: Using BankIt for Small-Scale Nucleotide Sequence Submissions”. This presentation will outline the process of using BankIt, a web-based submission tool at NCBI, to submit sequence data to the GenBank® database.

The webinar will demonstrate how to use BankIt forms to complete a submission of a single or a few nucleotide sequences. A second demonstration of BankIt will illustrate how to format and upload text input files needed for submissions of multiple sequences or for sequences with multiple genes.

This webinar will stay at a basic level for sequence submissions; future webinars that illustrate more complex sequence submissions will be considered depending on the feedback received from this presentation.

For more information and to register, check out the latest story on NCBI News:

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/news/11-21-2014-ncbi-webinar-genbank-bankit/

Sticky Teaching

How do you take advantage of the way the brain works to make what you’re teaching stick? Check out this short SlideShare from Chris Lema on The ABC’s of Sticky Teaching.

Has Cheezburger?

No that’s not a typo. And no we’re not going to talk about cheeseburgers (or cats) today. For those of you who don’t know what I’m talking about, visit here: http://icanhas.cheezburger.com

Now, on to the business at hand. PubMed contains commands to find citations with corrections, erratum, comments and patient summaries. View the 2 minute 32 second video to see where to find the commands and how to use them (Once you view the video below, you’ll see the connection between the title of this blog entry and the commands).

After you press Play, click on the controls below the video to change your view to HD (look for the little gear icon). You can also view the video in full-screen mode.

What We’re Reading: December Edition

Here are a few things we’ve been reading lately:

Did you find any of these particularly useful? Read anything lately that we should add to our “To Read” stack?

 

National Guideline Clearinghouse

Learn about the National Guideline Clearinghouse index of guidelines in this video snippet.

Are you a Subscriber? NLM Technical Bulletin

The NLM Technical Bulletin, produced by the National Library of Medicine, is your source for the latest PubMed changes and searching information. You can sign up for email updates or an RSS Feed. Be the first kid on the block to know!

techbulletin

Drawing a Chemical Structure

In the ChemIDplus Advanced search interface, you can draw a structure and search for similar substances. Here’s a quick tutorial on how to use the drawing feature of ChemIDplus.

Writing for the Ear

Recently, I downloaded a copy of No More Spilled Ink: Writing for Instructional Design by Connie Malamed. I recommend the free resource as a great guide if you’re writing content for any kind of online learning.

One section of the guide addresses writing audio scripts, and I thought I’d share a few of Malamed’s tips here, and use them to evaluate an audio script that I recently wrote for a short tutorial.

  • Tip 1: Write like you speak. This means using short sentences, everyday words, and contractions.
  • Tip 2: Keep it brief. Consider how much your audience can process at once and avoid overloading them.
  • Tip 3: Repeat key points. Use emphasis or new wording to help the learner understand.
  • Tip 4: Notate silence. A pause give learners processing time and keeps you from rushing.

So how does my script measure up?

I think my script sounds pretty close to my natural language. I’ve used contractions, such as “let’s” and “don’t”, my sentences are relatively short and straightforward. I have incorporated a few words of jargon, so I’ll review to make sure that they make sense to my intended audience. The script is brief (about 2 minutes) because I narrowed the topic ahead of time. I was tempted to explain a much larger concept, but decided to keep it tightly focused. However, I did not use any of my time to repeat key points. As I revise, I’ll consider adding a sentence that summarizes the take-home message. Finally, notating silence. I’ve never done this before, but I think it’s a great tip because I often find myself speaking more quickly than I would with a face-to-face audience. I seem to forget to pause and breathe, so I think putting the breaks in the script will help me find a more relaxed rhythm.

Check out the full version of the guide for more great tips!