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Feature Slides

  • PubMed ® for Trainers

    Do you train others to use PubMed? If so, join us for PubMed for Trainers, a hybrid class with 3 online sessions and 1 in-person session (eligible for 15 MLA CE credits). The class is an in-depth look at PubMed and a chance to share training ideas with your fellow participants.

    PubMed ® for Trainers

    PubMed ® for Trainers Picture
  • Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    The "Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching" course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI.

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics Picture
  • TOXNET® and Beyond

    This course is designed to convey the basics of searching the NLM's TOXNET®, a Web-based system of databases in the areas of toxicology, environmental health, and related fields.

    TOXNET® and Beyond

    TOXNET® and Beyond Picture
  • Teaching with Technology

    Learn how to take advantage of online tools to offer distance education classes and enhance face to face classes! Join us for this "asynchronous" (on your own time) class. The class is taught over 5 weeks and is eligible for 8 MLA CE credits.

    Teaching with Technology

    Teaching with Technology Picture
  • PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed for Librarians is made up of five one-hour segments. These five segments will be presented via Adobe Connect and recorded for archival access. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend.

    PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed® for Librarians Picture

MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing Activities for 2014

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is currently involved in MEDLINE year-end processing (YEP) activities. These include changing the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) main headings as well as Supplementary Concept Records that standardize names and associated numbers for chemical, protocols, and diseases that are not main headings. The MeSH edits include existing MEDLINE citations to conform with the 2015 version of MeSH, and other global changes.

Important Dates:

November 19, 2014: NLM expects to temporarily suspend the addition of fully-indexed MEDLINE citations to PubMed. Publisher-supplied and in process citations will continue to be added.

Mid-December 2014: PubMed MEDLINE citations, translation tables, and the MeSH database will have been updated to reflect 2015 MeSH.

For details about the impact on searching from November 20 to mid-December, see: Annual MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing (YEP): Impact on Searching During Fall 2014.

For background information on the general kinds of changes made annually, see: Annual MEDLINE/PubMed Year-End Processing (YEP): Background Information.

In Case You Missed It

Our blog is just one way we like to connect with you! We also have Twitter and Facebook accounts. Here are some of our most popular posts from the past few months:

Library Entrance at OHSU

Evidence-Based Education: What works?

Take a break (22 minutes) and watch this video presentation by Victoria Brazil, a physician and medical educator from Australia. She talks about what educational modalities and interventions are effective in medical education. Spoiler alert: the answer is everything and nothing.

http://www.thepoisonreview.com/2014/10/11/saturday-with-smacc-evidence-based-education-what-works/

Keeping up with the National Library of Medicine

One question we’re often asked in our classes is how to keep up with changes to PubMed and other NLM Resources. There are lots of changes, but there are several resources as well. Whether your interest is PubMed, History of Medicine, disaster medicine, or NCBI databases, you can find a blog, Facebook page, Twitter account, or even Pinterest board to follow. For the full list of ways to connect with NLM, see their social media page.

In addition to the NLM accounts, you can also follow the social media of your National Network of Libraries of Medicine Region or one of the Centers (like us, the National Library of Medicine Training Center).

Finally, we always recommend subscribing to the National Library of Medicine Technical Bulletin. You can be among the first to know about changes to PubMed and other important information that may impact your use of NLM resources. They also have a searchable archive that can be useful for finding when particular changes occurred. For example, you can search for “bolded” to learn that PubMed began making your search terms appear in bold in 2011.

Neurons Shaping Civilization?

When you reach out to grab an object, neurons fire telling your brain to reach and grab for the object. These are called motor command neurons and have been known about (by those who know) for about 50 years.

Researchers in Italy (PMID 24778385) recently found a subset of these command neurons called mirror neurons. Mirror neurons fire when you watch someone reach to grab an object. These neurons don’t even have to do the actual action in order to fire, all they have to do is see the action and they will fire.

Neurologist Vilayanur Ramachandra at University of California San Diego describes these neurons as empathy neurons and believes they may be involved with imitation and emulation…“because to imitate a complex act requires my brain to adopt the other person’s point of view.”

Why is this important? Learning by watching and not having to actually do a particular thing has helped to quickly spread new human behaviors across continents and populations; leap frogging evolution. For example, the use of a new tool, language or the use of fire could be learned by watching and then spread across humanity. Ramachandran says “the imitation of complex skills is what we call culture and is the basis of civilization.”

Watch the 7 minute 45 second TED talk here: www.ted.com/talks/vs_ramachandran_the_neurons_that_shaped_civilization

Nuns, Surgeons, and Transplant Recipients

What do nuns, surgeons, and transplant recipients have in common?

No, it’s not the beginning of a joke — they’re all new MeSH terms for 2015!

I mentioned last week that I love exploring the newly released MeSH terms. Here are a few more highlights.

In the information science branch, Common Data ElementsData CurationDatasets as Topic, and Printing, Three-Dimensional have all been added to the vocabulary.

Social NormsSocial SkillsCourage, and Craving have been added to the behavior branch, and I’m glad to see the addition of Military Family as well.

Several forms of elimination and absorption have been added, including Intramuscular Absorption and Lacrimal Elimination.

Palliative MedicineElectronic CigarettesCulturally Competent Care, and Grounded Theory also made it into the MeSH vocabulary this year.

Want to make a suggestion for next year? Send it to NLM!

Send in Your Application to Participate in “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” Bioinformatics Course

Health science librarians in the United States are invited to participate in the next offering of the bioinformatics training course, “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI,” sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, NLM Training Center (NTC).

The course provides knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI. Prior knowledge of molecular biology and genetics is not required. Participating in the Librarian’s Guide course will improve your ability to initiate or extend bioinformatics services at your institution.

Instructors will be NCBI staff and Diane Rein, Ph.D., MLS, Bioinformatics and Molecular Biology Liaison from the Health Science Library, University at Buffalo.

Online Pre-Course and In-Person Course Components
There are two parts to “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI,” listed below. Applicants must complete both parts. Participants must complete the pre-course with full CE credit (Part 1) in order to advance to attend the 5-day in-person course (Part 2).

  • Part 1: “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching,” an online (asynchronous) course,
    January 12-February 13, 2015

The major goal of this part is to provide an introduction to bioinformatics theory and practice in support of developing and implementing library-based bioinformatics products and services. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course encompasses visualizing bioinformatics end-user practice. It places a strong emphasis on hands-on acquisition of NCBI search competencies, and developing a working molecular biology vocabulary through self-paced hands-on exercises.

  • Part 2: A 5-day in-person course offered on-site at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland, March 9-13, 2015.

The in-person course will focus on using the BLAST sequence similarity search and Entrez text search systems to find relevant molecular data. The course will describe the various kinds of molecular data available and explain how these are generated and used in modern biomedical research. The course will be a combination of instruction, demonstration, discussions, and hands-one exercises (both individual and group).

Who can apply?

  • Applications are open to health science librarians in the United States.
  • Applicants will be accepted both from libraries currently providing bioinformatics services as well as from those desiring to implement services.
  • Enrollment is limited 25 participants.

What does it cost?

  • There is no charge for the classes. Travel and lodging costs for the in-person class are at the expense of the participant.

Important Application Dates

  • Application deadline: November 17, 2014
  • Acceptance notification: On or about December 15, 2014

How to Apply

  1. Please fill out the Application Form at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/guide_2015_app.
  2. Once you complete the Application Form, you will be directed to download the Supervisor Support Statement (ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/education/librarian_guide/Forms/Supervisor_Supportv2.pdf). This is to be filled out and signed by your immediate supervisor. This statement describes your current and/or future role in bioinformatics support at your institution and confirms your availability to attend the course if selected.
  3. Provide your current curriculum vitae (CV). Please use the suggested CV model as a guideline for the type of information desired (ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/education/librarian_guide/Forms/LibGuide_CV_model.pdf).

Course Page
The course page with additional information is at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/education/librarian/

Questions?
Please direct any questions to: ncbi_course@lists.utah.edu

DailyMed Gets a Facelift

The National Library of Medicine’s DailyMed site is the official provider of  Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label information a.k.a package inserts. The site contains approximately 66,000 drugs. The drug label information found on DailyMed is the most recent information submitted to the FDA and currently in use. Click here to visit the DailyMed site.

dailymed

The website update includes a responsive design, which formats itself to a variety of devices (smart phones, tablets, laptops, etc.) and many changes that improve usability and navigation.

You can set up an RSS alert to receive updates for a particular drug or for all DailyMed updates in the past seven days. Click here to setup an alert.

 

2015 MeSH now available!

I don’t know about anyone else, but I always look forward to seeing what new terms have made it into MeSH for the coming year. New MeSH for 2015 has been released, and I recommend taking a look by tree subcategory. You can find changed descriptors and deleted descriptors as well.

A couple highlights from my first look a the new MeSH:

In the Diseases branch of the MeSH tree, Rhinitis, AllergicChikungunya FeverAllesthesiaCorneal Injuries, and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder are some of the new additions.

New Investigative Techniques include BioprospectingControlled Before-After StudiesHealth Information ExchangeHistorically Controlled StudyNon-Randomized Controlled Trials as TopicPatient-Specific Modeling and Protective Factors.

Frankincense has been added as MeSH heading. And in case you’re wondering, Gold is already a MeSH heading, and myrrh oil is a supplementary concept. High Fructose Corn Syrup was also added, which is one that I would have guessed to already be in MeSH.

In the diagnostics and therapeutics categories, Diving ReflexFluorine-19 Magnetic Resonance ImagingDiet, PaleolithicRobotic Surgical Procedures have all been added.

Enjoy exploring the new MeSH terms, and share with us on Twitter or Facebook your favorite new MeSH term!

 

 

Population Health Query Added to PubMed

NLM just added a new special search query to the Topic-Specific Queries page. The strategy is not limited to U.S.-based articles.

Population Health Search Strategy

Follow this link to view the new search strategy.

The Topic-Specific Queries page can be found from PubMed’s home page. Look for the link in the center column labeled PubMed Tools.

Keep up with all the new features and changes to PubMed by subscribing to the Technical Bulletin.