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Feature Slides

  • PubMed ® for Trainers

    Do you train others to use PubMed? If so, join us for PubMed for Trainers, a hybrid class with 3 online sessions and 1 in-person session (eligible for 15 MLA CE credits). The class is an in-depth look at PubMed and a chance to share training ideas with your fellow participants.

    PubMed ® for Trainers

    PubMed ® for Trainers Picture
  • PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed for Librarians is made up of five 90-minute segments. These five segments will be presented via Adobe Connect and recorded for archival access. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend.

    PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed® for Librarians Picture
  • Discovering TOXNET®

    Discover TOXNET and other NLM environmental health databases through videos, guided tutorials, and discovery exercises in thirteen independent modules. The independent modules cover TOXLINE, ChemIDplus, TRI, TOXMAP, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, IRIS, and more.

    Discovering TOXNET®

    Discovering TOXNET® Picture

Tell Us What You Think!

We want you to tell us about our websiteWe want you to tell us about our websiteAs the NN/LM Training Office, we’re hoping to make improvements to our website which make it easier for you to quickly find the information you need. We hope you’ll take a few minutes to answer seven questions (just 7!) about what you do on nnlm.gov/ntc and what you’d like to do or see. Please contact us at nto@utah.edu if you have questions about this feedback form. Thank you for your input.

Tell us what you think!

 

Online Training Opportunity: PubMed for Librarians Series

PML_slide_imageJoin the National Library of Medicine and the NN/LM Training Office (NTO) for the free online class “PubMed for Librarians.” Classes in June 2016 are now open for registration.

The PubMed for Librarians class is divided into five segments (90 minutes each). Each segment is a synchronous online session that includes hands-on exercises and is worth 1.5 hours of MLA CE credit. Participants can choose any or all of the 5 segments that interest them.

The segments are as follows:

Introduction to PubMed: Learn about the difference between PubMed and MEDLINE, how to run a PubMed search, assess your search retrieval, analyze search details, employ three ways to search for a known citation, and how to customize with My NCBI.

MeSH (Medical Subject Headings): Learn about the NLM Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) database. Explore the four different types of MeSH terms and how searchers can benefit from using MeSH to build a search. Investigate the structure of the MeSH database and look at the components of a MeSH record.

Automatic Term Mapping (ATM): Learn about Automatic Term Mapping (ATM) – the process that maps keywords from your PubMed search to the controlled vocabulary of the MeSH database. Learn why searching with keywords in PubMed can be an effective approach to searching. Look at the explosion feature, what is and is not included in search details, and explore how PubMed processes phrases.

Building and Refining Your Search: Use some of the tools and features built into PubMed that are designed to help you search more effectively. Explore the filters sidebar and Topic-Specific Queries. Use History, tools in the NLM Catalog, and the Advanced Search Builder to build searches and explore topics.

Customization – My NCBI: Learn about the advantages of creating a My NCBI account, managing and manipulating your My NCBI page content, locating and identifying available filters on PubMed’s filter sidebar, selecting and setting up to fifteen filters, and creating a custom filter.

Class space is limited, so register now at http://nnlm.gov/training-schedule/all/NTC

 

Our name has changed, but we’re still in the training business

On May 1, 2016 the NTC’s name changed to the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO) to reflect our role in the new 5-year Cooperative Agreement with the US National Library of Medicine. You can view the announcement here: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/news/nlm-rml-coop-agreement-2016.html

Our headquarters remain at the University of Utah Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, under the direction of Jean Shipman, Principal Investigator. Our current staff includes Jessi Van Der Volgen as the Assistant Director, Rebecca Brown and Cheryl Rowan as Training Development Specialists, Sarah Dickey, Program Manager, and Matt Steadman, Web Software Engineer & Media Developer.

The Cooperative Agreement ushers in a new era where the NTO will move the vast majority of its training online, collaborating with NLM and NN/LM to ensure broad access to continuing education designed to keep you up to date on NLM resources and maximize your contribution to your institutional missions. You can look forward to several new learning opportunities – available to you in flexible formats – on PubMed, TOXNET and other NLM resources. Stay tuned for announcements of future class offerings.

One of the most important pieces of news is that for the time being you can still find our blog and class offerings at the same URL.

Our new Twitter name is @nnlmnto

Our new email address is nto@utah.edu and we welcome your comments, questions, and ideas.

Andra…What?

Anyone who has done teaching or taken classes in teaching methods has likely heard the term “pedagogy.” This term is most widely used currently to mean “the art and science … of teaching,” although the original meaning was actually more specific to teaching children. As librarians, we strive to create instructional materials that are appropriate for the learning needs of our students. For this reason, andragogy may be a better alternative and approach, especially for adult and online learners.

Andragogy as a methodology has its roots as far back as 1833 with a German teacher named Alexander Kapp, although its current usage is attributed to Malcolm Knowles, who adopted the word to describe the differences in the ways individuals – especially adults – learn.

Pedagogy and andragogy are very different teaching models. For example, pedagogy is considered a content model, whereas andragogy is a process model. The process model aims to provide the skills and resources needed to acquire information, rather than simply presenting information. Andragogy encourages the teacher as facilitator, where the emphasis in on enabling the student to learn. For adult learners and online students, andragogy may provide a more suitable teaching model. And, with the increasing tendency toward online classes, students are increasingly self-directed.

This table illustrates key differences between pedagogical and andragogical design.

Pedagogy vs Andragogy
It should be noted that these two methods are not mutually exclusive. It is always up to the the teacher or facilitator to determine the best approach for his or her students.

For more information, please see the full article, “Keeping Up With … Andragogy”

Try the new Q&A Feature in Google Slides for Engagement

Have you tried Google Slides? I don’t use it on a regular basis, but I just learned about a new feature called Q & A. Q&A is designed to let audience members ask questions during a presentation (anonymously, if they prefer).

What’s so novel about that you ask? Students use their smartphone or other smart device to submit questions to the instructor at any point. OK, but what else can Q & A do? As questions are submitted via a shared URL, students “like” questions that they what to know the answer to. The instructor sees, in real-time, which questions are most important to the audience.

What are some ways to use the Q & A feature in Google Slides?

  • Can be used for in-person and online sessions
  • Fosters inclusion for remote participants
  • Students can ask questions when they come to mind
  • Gauge knowledge; Who knows what in the “room”?
  • Use instead of traditional chat box as a way to moderate chat
  • Meets users where they are, their smart-devices
  • Audience size doesn’t inhibit participation

Here’s a short video by Richard Byrne on how to use the tool. 

2014 TRI Data added to TOXMAP

Industries and businesses in the United States use tens of thousands of chemicals to make the products we depend on, such as pharmaceuticals, computers, paints, clothing, and automobiles. Although the majority of toxic chemicals are managed by industrial facilities to minimize releases of chemicals into the environment, releases do still occur.

It is your right to know what toxic chemicals are being used in your community, how they are managed, whether they are being released into the environment, the quantities of these releases, and whether such quantities are increasing or decreasing over time.

The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is an EPA program that tracks the management of certain toxic chemicals that may pose a threat to human health and the environment. This information is submitted by thousands of U.S. facilities on over 650 chemicals and chemical categories under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the Pollution Prevention Act (PPA).

Citizen Science

Citizenscience.gov is an official U.S. government website designed to accelerate innovation through public participation with the use of crowd sourcing and citizen science across the government. The site provides a portal to three key assets for federal practitioners:

  1. A searchable catalog of federally supported citizen science projects
  2. A toolkit to assist with designing and maintaining projects
  3. A gateway to a federal community of practice to share best practices

citizenscience

Read more about the initiativewww.citizenscience.gov/about/

You can follow the site on Twitter@FedCitSci

NLM Awards Cooperative Agreements for 2016-2021

The University of Utah Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library is pleased to announce that it has been awarded the Cooperative Agreement by the National Library of Medicine to serve as the National Training Office (NTO) for the 2016-2021 contract period, beginning May 1, 2016.

On April 1, 2016, the National Library of Medicine awarded five-year cooperative agreements to eight institutions to serve as Regional Medical Libraries (RMLs) and five National Coordinating Offices in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM). The agreements begin May 1, 2016. The Network consists of the eight RMLs, five National Coordinating Offices, nearly 112 resource libraries (primarily at medical schools), over 2,200 local health science libraries (primarily at hospitals), and more than 1,300 public libraries and community-based organizations.

We are pleased to continue to serve the National Network of Libraries of Medicine in the coming five years. For more information and the full list of awards, see the full announcement.

What We’re Reading – Instructional Design

book pileThe month of March means “spring break” for many academic institutions. And that may mean a break from instruction, but we wanted to give you a short “reading list” in case you are looking for something to occupy any extra time you might have!Here are three titles which the NTC staff have been reading and using in our training recently. In fact, if you’ve been in PubMed for Trainers within the past several months, you may have heard us mention at least one of them.

    1. The Accidental Instructional Designer: Learning Design for the Digital Age by Cammy Bean. Here’s a blurb from the back cover: “We’ve all been taught to think that training is always the solution and that just about anyone can figure out how to do it. And as technology-based learning continues to slip into the mainstream, managers will continue to tap heads to turn regular people, who know the content or show some talent at creating a PowerPoint deck, into instructional designers and trainers. This means that we’ll see accidents – in the form of accidental instructional designers – happening more and more.”
    2. Telling Ain’t Training by Harold D. Stolovitch and Erica J. Keeps. Here’s a brief summary from amazon.com: This book is an entertaining and practical guide for every trainer and performance improvement professional as it tackles the three universal and persistent questions of the profession―how do learners learn, why do learners learn, and how do you ensure that learning sticks. Playful illustrations demonstrate the solid research that back up the authors’ contentions and help readers separate learning myth from fact to dispel beliefs and practices that often harm the instructional process.
    3.  The Gamification of Learning and Instruction: Game-based Methods and Strategies for Training by Karl M. Kapp. Here’s what one reviewer said: “Kapp argues convincingly that gamification is not just about adding points, levels and badges to an eLearning program, but about fundamentally rethinking learning design. He has put together a brilliant primer for learning professionals on how to gamify learning, packed with useful advice and examples (Anders Gronstedt, president, Gronstedt Group via amazon.com).

Hope there is something here that sparks your interest. Happy reading!

Photo credit: torchalum.wordpress.com

We’re Hiring!

University of Utah Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library
Training Development Specialist Position Announcement
The Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library invites applications for a Training Development Specialist for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO). The Training Development Specialist is responsible for developing, teaching and supporting classes in a variety of formats on NLM resources throughout the United States. This is a career-line (non-tenure track) faculty appointment, reporting to the Assistant Director of the NTO.

Application Instructions:

To apply, please go to the University’s Career page. Look for the position titled “Training Development Specialist.”  Apply online at https://utah.peopleadmin.com/postings/50089.

The University of Utah is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer and does not discriminate based upon race, national origin, color, religion, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, status as a person with a disability, genetic information, or Protected Veteran status. Individuals from historically underrepresented groups, such as minorities, women, qualified persons with disabilities and protected veterans are encouraged to apply. Veterans’ preference is extended to qualified applicants, upon request and consistent with University policy and Utah state law. Upon request, reasonable accommodations in the application process will be provided to individuals with disabilities. To inquire about the University’s nondiscrimination or affirmative action policies or to request disability accommodation, please contact: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, 201 S. Presidents Circle, Rm 135, (801) 581-8365.

The University of Utah values candidates who have experience working in settings with students from diverse backgrounds, and possess a strong commitment to improving access to higher education for historically underrepresented students.

The University of Utah HSC values candidates who are committed to fostering and furthering the culture of compassion, collaboration, innovation, accountability, diversity, integrity, quality, and trust that is integral to the mission of the University of Utah Health Sciences Center.