Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About NTC | Contact NTC | NTC Feedback |NTC Sitemap | Help | Bookmark and Share

Feature Slides

  • PubMed ® for Trainers

    Do you train others to use PubMed? If so, join us for PubMed for Trainers, a hybrid class with 3 online sessions and 1 in-person session (eligible for 15 MLA CE credits). The class is an in-depth look at PubMed and a chance to share training ideas with your fellow participants.

    PubMed ® for Trainers

    PubMed ® for Trainers Picture
  • Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    The "Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching" course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI.

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics Picture
  • TOXNET® and Beyond

    This course is designed to convey the basics of searching the NLM's TOXNET®, a Web-based system of databases in the areas of toxicology, environmental health, and related fields.

    TOXNET® and Beyond

    TOXNET® and Beyond Picture
  • Teaching with Technology

    Learn how to take advantage of online tools to offer distance education classes and enhance face to face classes! Join us for this "asynchronous" (on your own time) class. The class is taught over 5 weeks and is eligible for 8 MLA CE credits.

    Teaching with Technology

    Teaching with Technology Picture
  • PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed for Librarians is made up of five one-hour segments. These five segments will be presented via Adobe Connect and recorded for archival access. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend.

    PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed® for Librarians Picture

Send in Your Application to Participate in “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” Bioinformatics Course

Health science librarians in the United States are invited to participate in the next offering of the bioinformatics training course, “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI,” sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, NLM Training Center (NTC).

The course provides knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI. Prior knowledge of molecular biology and genetics is not required. Participating in the Librarian’s Guide course will improve your ability to initiate or extend bioinformatics services at your institution.

Instructors will be NCBI staff and Diane Rein, Ph.D., MLS, Bioinformatics and Molecular Biology Liaison from the Health Science Library, University at Buffalo.

Online Pre-Course and In-Person Course Components
There are two parts to “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI,” listed below. Applicants must complete both parts. Participants must complete the pre-course with full CE credit (Part 1) in order to advance to attend the 5-day in-person course (Part 2).

  • Part 1: “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching,” an online (asynchronous) course,
    January 12-February 13, 2015

The major goal of this part is to provide an introduction to bioinformatics theory and practice in support of developing and implementing library-based bioinformatics products and services. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course encompasses visualizing bioinformatics end-user practice. It places a strong emphasis on hands-on acquisition of NCBI search competencies, and developing a working molecular biology vocabulary through self-paced hands-on exercises.

  • Part 2: A 5-day in-person course offered on-site at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland, March 9-13, 2015.

The in-person course will focus on using the BLAST sequence similarity search and Entrez text search systems to find relevant molecular data. The course will describe the various kinds of molecular data available and explain how these are generated and used in modern biomedical research. The course will be a combination of instruction, demonstration, discussions, and hands-one exercises (both individual and group).

Who can apply?

  • Applications are open to health science librarians in the United States.
  • Applicants will be accepted both from libraries currently providing bioinformatics services as well as from those desiring to implement services.
  • Enrollment is limited 25 participants.

What does it cost?

  • There is no charge for the classes. Travel and lodging costs for the in-person class are at the expense of the participant.

Important Application Dates

  • Application deadline: November 17, 2014
  • Acceptance notification: On or about December 15, 2014

How to Apply

  1. Please fill out the Application Form at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/guide_2015_app.
  2. Once you complete the Application Form, you will be directed to download the Supervisor Support Statement (ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/education/librarian_guide/Forms/Supervisor_Supportv2.pdf). This is to be filled out and signed by your immediate supervisor. This statement describes your current and/or future role in bioinformatics support at your institution and confirms your availability to attend the course if selected.
  3. Provide your current curriculum vitae (CV). Please use the suggested CV model as a guideline for the type of information desired (ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/education/librarian_guide/Forms/LibGuide_CV_model.pdf).

Course Page
The course page with additional information is at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/education/librarian/

Questions?
Please direct any questions to: ncbi_course@lists.utah.edu

DailyMed Gets a Facelift

The National Library of Medicine’s DailyMed site is the official provider of  Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label information a.k.a package inserts. The site contains approximately 66,000 drugs. The drug label information found on DailyMed is the most recent information submitted to the FDA and currently in use. Click here to visit the DailyMed site.

dailymed

The website update includes a responsive design, which formats itself to a variety of devices (smart phones, tablets, laptops, etc.) and many changes that improve usability and navigation.

You can set up an RSS alert to receive updates for a particular drug or for all DailyMed updates in the past seven days. Click here to setup an alert.

 

2015 MeSH now available!

I don’t know about anyone else, but I always look forward to seeing what new terms have made it into MeSH for the coming year. New MeSH for 2015 has been released, and I recommend taking a look by tree subcategory. You can find changed descriptors and deleted descriptors as well.

A couple highlights from my first look a the new MeSH:

In the Diseases branch of the MeSH tree, Rhinitis, AllergicChikungunya FeverAllesthesiaCorneal Injuries, and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder are some of the new additions.

New Investigative Techniques include BioprospectingControlled Before-After StudiesHealth Information ExchangeHistorically Controlled StudyNon-Randomized Controlled Trials as TopicPatient-Specific Modeling and Protective Factors.

Frankincense has been added as MeSH heading. And in case you’re wondering, Gold is already a MeSH heading, and myrrh oil is a supplementary concept. High Fructose Corn Syrup was also added, which is one that I would have guessed to already be in MeSH.

In the diagnostics and therapeutics categories, Diving ReflexFluorine-19 Magnetic Resonance ImagingDiet, PaleolithicRobotic Surgical Procedures have all been added.

Enjoy exploring the new MeSH terms, and share with us on Twitter or Facebook your favorite new MeSH term!

 

 

Population Health Query Added to PubMed

NLM just added a new special search query to the Topic-Specific Queries page. The strategy is not limited to U.S.-based articles.

Population Health Search Strategy

Follow this link to view the new search strategy.

The Topic-Specific Queries page can be found from PubMed’s home page. Look for the link in the center column labeled PubMed Tools.

Keep up with all the new features and changes to PubMed by subscribing to the Technical Bulletin.

New LactMed Video

LactMed is part of the suite of TOXNET databases and provides information on drugs and other chemicals to which breastfeeding mothers may be exposed. With the new TOXNET interface, it was also updated. Check out this updated video from the National Library of Medicine to learn more about LactMed.

 

Now Available in Wide Release: Searching the Hazardous Substances Data Bank

A new how-to video called: Basics of Searching the Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB) has been released by SIS featuring the newly updated TOXNET interface.

Tips for Class Discussions

Thinking of incorporating discussion into your next class? Here are a few tips to consider as you develop your lesson plan.

two men and two women seated in a discussion

  • Target the discussion. You should have a well-defined topic or outcome for the discussion. Do you want them to come to a consensus about something? Produce a list of advantages and disadvantages? Whatever the purpose, having a clear focus will help keep the learners on track during the conversation.
  • Put a time limit on the discussion. A timeframe communicates to learners how long they have to discuss their ideas and may help avoid having one or two folks monopolize the discourse. Be sure to set the time expectation at the beginning, and if warranted, you can post a timer or have someone in the group be the timekeeper.
  • Consider the environment. What is the seating arrangement? Does it allow for easy exchange of ideas in small or large groups? Will everyone be able to hear? Do groups need space to discuss privately?
  • Consider the group size. Are you having a whole class discussion? Or will the learners be broken into smaller groups? Sharing ideas in a small group first can be less intimidating and help the salient points to be shared in a larger discussion. Groups of 3 or 4 tend to allow for all voices to be heard.
  • Develop learning materials. Depending on the discussion, your groups may or may not need any supporting materials. You might use a picture or slide to generate discussion, have a recording sheet, or supply data for the group to discuss. Make sure the materials are easily accessible for all in the group.

Do You Like it Chunky? OR How to Chunk

Basics of Content Chunking from Fareeza Marican

You can read more about chunking here: http://ow.ly/APZOD

What We’re Reading

Stack of magazines viewed from corner

 

Summer can  be a great time to catch up on reading. Here are a few things we’ve been reading that you might find interesting or useful too.

What did you read over the summer? Share with us on Facebook or Twitter your favorites!

 

Universal Design for Learning

Have you heard of Universal Design for Learning? At the Annual Conference for Distance Teaching and Learning, I attended a few session with a focus on this principle. Here’s a primer video on Universal Design for Learning that will help you become acquainted. If you want to learn more, check out cast.org