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Feature Slides

  • PubMed ® for Trainers

    Do you train others to use PubMed? If so, join us for PubMed for Trainers, a hybrid class with 3 online sessions and 1 in-person session (eligible for 15 MLA CE credits). The class is an in-depth look at PubMed and a chance to share training ideas with your fellow participants.

    PubMed ® for Trainers

    PubMed ® for Trainers Picture
  • Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    The "Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Searching" course provides basic knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI.

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics

    Fundamentals of Bioinformatics Picture
  • TOXNET® and Beyond

    This course is designed to convey the basics of searching the NLM's TOXNET®, a Web-based system of databases in the areas of toxicology, environmental health, and related fields.

    TOXNET® and Beyond

    TOXNET® and Beyond Picture
  • Teaching with Technology

    Learn how to take advantage of online tools to offer distance education classes and enhance face to face classes! Join us for this "asynchronous" (on your own time) class. The class is taught over 5 weeks and is eligible for 8 MLA CE credits.

    Teaching with Technology

    Teaching with Technology Picture
  • PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed for Librarians is made up of five one-hour segments. These five segments will be presented via Adobe Connect and recorded for archival access. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend.

    PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed® for Librarians Picture

Job Opportunity at NTC

Assistant Director, National Library of Medicine Training Center

The Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah seeks an imaginative team leader with progressive ideas to lead the National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC). The Assistant Director reports directly to the Associate Director of the NN/LM MidContinental Region. The Assistant Director plans and implements the activity of the NTC; supervises NTC professional and support staff; and, in conjunction with National Library of Medicine staff, coordinates the activities of the NTC with other components of the NN/LM program, in order to support the effective use of NLM information products and services.  With the NTC team, the Assistant Director assures compliance with all elements of the Statement of Work that is part of the contract with the National Library of Medicine and develops and implements a strategic program plan for the NTC, including the appropriate assessment and evaluation of instruction. The individual in this position prepares an annual budget and supervises the timely delivery of class reports, quarterly reports, annual reports, and evaluation reports. The Assistant Director conducts online and in-person training classes throughout the United States on PubMed, TOXNET and other topics related to training and NLM resources and coordinates NCBI training. The NTC web site, social media plan, and national and regional class registration system falls under the Assistant Director’s supervision.  Responsibilities also include monitoring new developments related to NLM products and services and monitoring, disseminating and incorporating new information and trends related to distance learning, adult learning and instruction. Position is a full-time, non-tenure track faculty position.

For more information on duties, qualifications, etc. please view our job listing <http://utah.peopleadmin.com/postings/40608 >

Affirmative Action Statement

The University of Utah is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer and does not discriminate based upon race, national origin, color, religion, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, status as a person with a disability, genetic information, or Protected Veteran status. Individuals from historically underrepresented groups, such as minorities, women, qualified persons with disabilities and protected veterans are encouraged to apply. Veterans’ preference is extended to qualified applicants, upon request and consistent with University policy and Utah state law. Upon request, reasonable accommodations in the application process will be provided to individuals with disabilities. To inquire about the University’s nondiscrimination or affirmative action policies or to request disability accommodation, please contact: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, 201 S. Presidents Circle, Rm 135, (801) 581-8365.

The University of Utah values candidates who have experience working in settings with students from diverse backgrounds, and possess a strong commitment to improving access to higher education for historically underrepresented students.

The University of Utah Health Sciences Center is a patient focused center distinguished by collaboration, excellence, leadership, and Respect.  The University of Utah HSC values candidates who are committed to fostering and furthering the culture of compassion, collaboration, innovation, accountability, diversity, integrity, quality, and trust that is integral to the mission of the University of Utah Health Sciences Center.

Running a Webinar or Online Meeting? Here’s a Checklist

We’ve all attended good online meetings and bad online meetings. What qualities make for a good online meeting? Here is a short list of suggestions on how to run a successful online session.

  • Use a slide to let people know they’re in the right place
  • Acknowledge that people have arrived
  • Open up a “question of the day”. Nothing difficult; just something to engage and focus people while they’re waiting for the “show” to begin
  • Mute all participants. Yes, we want attendees to ask questions and make comments. No, we don’t want to hear papers rustling or conversations with co-workers who stop by to visit
  • Explain how to unmute
  • Orient participants to the interface and tools
  • To quote the Rolling Stones: “We all need someone we can lean on.” Arrange for someone to work with participants who are having trouble with audio, to read questions from the chat box, to start and stop the recording, etc.

And…in case you haven’t seen the video that depicts common online webinar frustrations as portrayed in an in-person meeting, you can watch the 4 minute video below. Very funny and too true.

NTC Tutorials & Recordings Anytime

Did you know that you can view our tutorials and recordings at any time that’s convenient for you? If you have a few extra minutes, check out one of our self-paced tutorials or recorded webinars to learn something new or brush up on one of your most-used resources. Here are a few you might take a look at:

 

PubMed Display Changes: Citation Status Tags

As of March 26, 2015 PubMed will no longer display the citation status tags while in the Summary Display option. Now, the tags can only be seen while in the Abstract or Abstract (text) options.

If you rely on these tags to quickly scan the status of your results, there is a workaround. You can choose or create filters that will always show on the right side of your results page by using your My NCBI account.

The MEDLINE filter is available in the Filters portlet within your My NCBI account. Once in the Filters portlet, click on Properties and then Subsets. You’ll find MEDLINE in the list.

Here is a short video on how to setup filters in My NCBI:

To create a filter for In Process and As Supplied by Publisher citations, you will need to create two custom filters. When creating the custom filters, use this format to capture In Process citations: inprocess[sb] and use this format to capture As Supplied by Publisher citations: publisher[sb].

Here is a short video about how to create a custom filter.

Click here to view the page in PubMed Help that shows you the search tag format for each type of citation status.

Turn Text into a Mind Map

This is a fun tool for getting thoughts down quickly and it has a pretty shallow learning curve. Just go to: https://www.text2mindmap.com/ It’s free and you don’t even have to register to get started.

Why Tell Stories

Chalkboard with What's Your Story

Take a minute and think of a story that inspired you. Maybe it changed your mind about something, spurred you to action, or just made you think. Don’t you hope your classes do the same for students?

We often hear about the importance of using stories to in classes to engage students and improve understanding, but let’s take a look at a few reasons why stories work.

Stories help us connect emotionally with our students, and when we do that, our students are primed to believe us.
Stories sharpen our curiosity. If you’re reading a good story, you want to continue reading and find out what happens next. The same is true for learners. A student trying to predict the next event is more engaged in learning.
Stories give relevance and context to the lessons, which helps students identify what’s in it for them.
Stories make complex concepts easier to understand by demonstrating what learners should do.
Stories are easier to process. Since you learned to read you’ve been making sense of stories, but you’ve had to learn to process graphs and charts.

To learn more about why stories work, check out this publication from SHIFT elearning.

Do you Annotate?

If you have videos that you’ve made and uploaded to your YouTube account, then you have access to the annotation tool. Here is a 5 minute video that demonstrates how to add annotations, speech bubbles, callouts and links to other videos from within your completed video.

What We’re Reading: March Edition

Here are a few things that we’ve been reading lately. Now to get through the rest of the stack and bookmarks!

What interesting things have you come across lately? Share with us on Twitter @nnlmntc or Facebook.

Do You Padlet?

Padlet is a cool tool that can be used for instruction. Basically, it is a blank wall and you can decide what you want to “hang” on it. You can use Padlet to: take notes, solicit feedback, as a discussion board or any other thing where you want some sort of input from others.

I made two Padlets to demonstrate different uses. Here’s a padlet that I used as a forum for people to introduce themselves: http://padlet.com/rebeccaleon/aboutme Here’s another Padlet I made based on the video in this post. If you don’t like the chaos of letting people write anywhere they want on the wall, you can make columns, as seen here: http://padlet.com/RebeccaLeon/psr Here is the 4 minute video that shows you how to make columns in Padlet:

You can find Padlet here: https://padlet.com/ It’s free!

Improve Your Presentations: 10 Tips

Check out this TEDx video with Garr Reynolds from Presentation Zen for tips on improving your presentations with storytelling.