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Feature Slides

  • PubMed ® for Trainers

    Do you train others to use PubMed? If so, join us for PubMed for Trainers, a hybrid class with 3 online sessions and 1 in-person session (eligible for 15 MLA CE credits). The class is an in-depth look at PubMed and a chance to share training ideas with your fellow participants.

    PubMed ® for Trainers

    PubMed ® for Trainers Picture
  • PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed for Librarians is made up of five one-hour segments. These five segments will be presented via Adobe Connect and recorded for archival access. Each segment is meant to be a stand-alone module designed for each user to determine how many and in what sequence they attend.

    PubMed® for Librarians

    PubMed® for Librarians Picture
  • Discovering TOXNET®

    Discover TOXNET and other NLM environmental health databases through videos, guided tutorials, and discovery exercises in thirteen independent modules. The independent modules cover TOXLINE, ChemIDplus, TRI, TOXMAP, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, IRIS, and more.

    Discovering TOXNET®

    Discovering TOXNET® Picture

PubMed for Trainers Coming to a Town Near You

The NTC and NLM will be offering PubMed for Trainers 10 times between now and April 30, 2016.

PubMed for Trainers is a 4-part series of classes; 3 online plus 1 in-person class. The class is worth 13 MLA CE credits.

Click here for a complete description of PubMed for Trainers

Boston, MA August 5-25, 2015 (Waiting List Only)

New York, NY August 5-27, 2015 (Registration closed)

Chicago, IL September 3-25, 2015

Seattle, WA October 22-November 10, 2015 (Registration closed)

Bethesda, MD October 20-29, 2015

Miami, FL January 7-28, 2016

Bethesda, MD February 2-9, 2016

Davis, CA February 4-25, 2016

Dallas, TX March 3-24, 2016

St. Louis, MO April 4 – 14, 2016

PubMed for Trainers offers an in-depth, behind the scenes look at PubMed. You will:

  • Fill gaps in general knowledge you might have about MEDLINE and PubMed.
  • Enhance your knowledge of the MEDLINE database
  • Discover what the National Library of Medicine considers good background information.
  • Improve your PubMed search technique.
  • Improve your ability to analyze and implement Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)

Click here to view the complete schedule of classes.

We hope to see you there!!

Save the Dates: 2015-2016 “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” Course

“…by far the best educational experience I have had in my years of being a librarian.”

“I don’t think I’ve ever had such a comprehensive professional development opportunity.”

[I am] “confident going back to my institution and teaching these resources as well as starting an information service.”

— Comments from recent class participants

Are you a health science librarian in the United States who offers (or wants to offer) bioinformatics services at your institution? The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and the NLM Training Center will be offering “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” course in 2015-2016. Participants who complete the class will be eligible for Medical Library Association Continuing Education credits. The course is free, but travel, lodging and related costs are at the expense of the participant.

There are two parts to the course, and applicants must take both parts:

Part 1: “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching” is a six-week, online (asynchronous) pre-course. Successful completion of this pre-course is required to continue to Part 2.

Part 2: A five-day in-person course offered on-site at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland.
Previous graduates of the “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching” online course are encouraged to apply and may audit Part 1 in preparation for Part 2.

Interested in taking only the online version of the “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching” course? Watch for an upcoming second announcement of an offering in January – February, 2016.

Important Dates:
Monday, August 10, 2015 – Application materials will be posted, linked from a detailed announcement here in the NLM Technical Bulletin.
Monday, September 14, 2015 – Application deadline.
Monday, October 5, 2015 – Acceptance notifications e-mailed.
Monday, October 26, 2015 – “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching” pre-course begins.
Monday, March 7, 2016 – “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” five-day in-person class begins at NLM.

Mark your calendars for this extraordinary training opportunity!

Laboratories can be dangerous

The US National Library of Medicine (NLM) offers a guide to web resources in laboratory safety with links to information for clinical, academic and school labs. It includes resources for handling chemical, biological, and nanotechnology safely.

The guide also links to repositories of health and safety videos and includes pre-formulated searches of NLM resources.

labsafety

Check it out at http://sis.nlm.nih.gov/enviro/labsafety.html

 

Sharing a PubMed Search Strategy: The Movie (repost)

Did you know that you can easily share a PubMed search strategy by sending the URL for the search? Watch this one minute video to learn how.

PubMed Milestone – 25 Millionth Journal Citation Added

You can find the latest number of citations in PubMed by searching with this command: all[sb].

25 million citations in PubMed

Particulate Matter and your Health

Do you work with young audiences? Here’s a video (intended for middle schoolers) from the Specialized Information Services division of NLM about particulate matter, its sources and the impact on our health. The animated video defines particulate matter, where it is found, how it is formed, and the potential risk to human health. 

You can find other resources intended for young audiences by following this link:
http://kidsenvirohealth.nlm.nih.gov/

Citation Status Tags: The More You Know

Do you miss viewing the PubMed Citation Status tag while in the Summary View? The Citation Status tag tells us which step in the indexing process a particular citation is in and whether or not we can expect to find MeSH terms applied to the citation, now or in the future.

Click here for a previous post on how to setup a Custom filter using your MyNCBI account for some of the citation statuses.

Here is a list of the different statuses that a citation can have and the search command to use to create a filter.

Here is a short video by NLM on how to use your MyNCBI account to add a right-side filter.

 

PubMed “Save Search” and” Related Citations” Renamed

You knew them as Save Search, RSS and Related Citations. The names have been changed, but the functionality is the same.

Click here to read about the new “Create Alert” link.

pubmedchanges

 

 Click here to read about the new “Similar Articles” link. 

pubmedchanges2

 

 

How frequently is your published paper accessed?

Probably a familiar question if you work with NIH funded researches and authors. Once a paper is made publicly available in PubMed Central (PMC), researchers, medical professionals, students and the general public can obtain the full text of the paper at any time.

Through the National Institutes of Health Manuscript System (NIHMS), you can find data on the number of users accessing an author’s paper each month. This data is available for any author manuscripts associated with a users’ NIHMS account. (Note: Statistics are limited to PMC usage and do not include access from the publisher site or anywhere else the paper may have been posted.)

Click here to read all about the NIHMS system, how to setup an account: http://goo.gl/fe7gIJ

Twitter Chats

Historically (does Twitter have a history?),Twitter has been used to follow a person/group/product (ex. @nnlmntc). You can also post, follow and search for tweets using a hashtag (ex. #medlibs or #pubmed).

Another use of Twitter is to use it to attend a real-time Twitter chat (or Tweet Chat).

The image below shows a screenshot of the #medlibs archived sessions. Click on the photo to view a larger/clearer image.

#medlibs Chat Schedule

How Does it Work?
At the day and time of the scheduled chat the designated moderator will begin the chat. If it’s your first time attending a chat, watch to see how people enter their responses to the posed questions. The image below shows an example of a common approach where participants respond to the moderator’s question (ex. Q1) with their answer in the format: Q1 and then continue to type an answer in 140 characters or less. Make sure to include the group’s hashtag in your response. People follow hashtags and that is how your comment will be seen by the intended audience.

Click on the photo below to view a larger/clearer image.

Twitter Chat Archive

Click here to view the #medlibs chat schedule

Here are two sites with a list of librarian hashtags:
There’s a Twitter Chat for That

Top Twitter Hashtags for Librarians

Happy tweeting!