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Two Great Photovoice Guides

[guest post by Cindy Olney, OERC]

Photovoice is an evaluation method for the times.  This method engages program stakeholders (learners; service recipients; community members) in taking photographs and using them as springboards to express their experiences and points of view.  With the prevalence of cameras in mobile devices, along with social media forums, most of us already are engaging in the foundational practices underlying photovoice: taking photos, posting them, and sharing our experiences.  Add in some facilitators who provide systematic method design, project management and ethical oversight; and you have the potential to gather program insights that would go untouched through traditional methods.

Today’s post introduces you to two practical resources written by action researchers describing their lessons learned about conducting photovoice projects. The documents also show you or link you to photos and commentary from contributing participants.


From the Prairie Women’s Health Centre of Excellence

One comprehensive guide comes from the Prairie Women’s Health Centre of Excellence  (PWHCE), located in Canada.  The center engages in collaborative, community-based research on social and other determinants of the health of women and girls. The center’s mission is to provide expert advice on social policies related to women’s health. The authors (Beverly Palibroda, Brigette Krieg, Lisa Murdock and Joanne Havelock) published A Practical Guide To Photovoice: Sharing Pictures, Telling Stories and Changing Communities, a nuts-and-bolts photovoice manual. It provides detailed advice, with periodic sidebars summarizing process. An appendix includes a helpful checklist. You will find sample photovoice entries throughout the document.

The manual was written in 2009.  Since that time, the PWHCE has introduced digital story-telling into its portfolio of participatory methods.  Check out the stories here.


Another guide was produced based on a photovoice project for, an educational website providing authoritative information about brain injury symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. The project featured the stories of eight members with traumatic brain injury.  The gallery of essays is available here.   Facilitators Laura Lorenz and Barbara Webster developed a succinct facilitator guide based on this project.

If you want to learn how to do a photovoice project, these documents are a great place to start. You also can find other resources in OERC’s blog entries posted in 2012 and  2014. webinar (12/9/15 @ 11am)

On Wendesday December 9, 2015 at 11am, Hathy Simpson, Public Health Information Specialist, will provide an overview of public health information resources available from the public health web portal,, including the Healthy People 2020 Structured Evidence Queries (pre-formulated searches of PubMed). provides a single point of access to credible public health information including public health topic pages, health data tools and statistics, research reports, grant opportunities, news articles, conference proceedings, and continuing education opportunities.

Registration is not required but appreciated.  To register go to our training calendar.

Click here to access the class on December 9th.

First offering of NCBI NOW (Next generation sequencing Online Workshop) to begin October 13, 2015

From October 13th to October 23rd, NCBI will present the first iteration of NCBI NOW, a free online experience aimed at those new to next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis. Enrollment in this course is limited to the first 1,000 participants who sign up through the ORAU Portal: Since enrollment is on a first-come, first-served basis, please only sign up for this educational opportunity if you will be able to participate fully.

Learners will watch 6-7 videos (average video duration: 45-60 minutes) online during the first 7 days of the course. These videos will cover the basics of NGS data, preprocessing, quality control and alignment strategies for both DNA-Seq and RNA-Seq, as well as a brief discussion of downstream analysis. Additionally, we will demonstrate how to leverage BLAST tools for NGS analysis.

Next, participants will apply a selection of RNA-Seq alignment algorithms over three days (1-2 hours per day), mapping RNA-Seq data to GRCh38 chromosome 20. Finally, participants will compare the results of these mappers for specific genes. Throughout the course, participants will be able to post questions at Biostars; experts from NCBI and elsewhere will be available online to answer questions.

Learners will emerge from the course equipped to map their own RNA-Seq or DNA-Seq data to the human genome, understand the options for downstream analysis, and use their understanding of the basic steps of data processing to interact more effectively with bioinformatician collaborators.

Planning & Evaluating Health Information Outreach Project

*Small group learning experience via teleconference, limited to 20 participants

Is your library committed to making inroads with community partners? We invite you to learn outcomes-based planning in an online group setting. Our group will explore health information outreach project planning. Examples of community outreach include: inviting a community partner to do health screenings at your location; hosting wellness classes taught by a community partner; teaching health information classes at a community partner’s location; or collaborating with partners to bring in guest speakers on health topics. We will use the Planning & Evaluating Health Information Outreach Projects Booklets, a series of three booklets from The Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC).

Getting Started with Community-Based Outreach
Thursday, October 29th 10:30 – 11:30 AM ET
We’ll discuss the best approaches to get organized to perform a literature search, identify our stakeholders and gather community information.

Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Projects
Tuesday, December 1st 10:30 – 11:30 AM ET
Come learn how to connect activities to outcomes with a logic model. Participants will have a chance to share ideas for outreach to community partners and get feedback from others.

Collecting and Analyzing Evaluation Data
Thursday, January 14th 10:30 – 11:30 AM ET
The National Network of Libraries of Medicine Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) leadership will go over the ins and outs of data collection methods. We will learn how to analyze data for quantitative methods and qualitative methods.

Health Information Outreach Project Planning and Evaluation Showcase
Tuesday, April 12th 10:30 – 11:30 AM ET
Share your completed worksheets and activities from the Planning and Evaluating Health Information Outreach Projects booklets. The showcase is open to all NER network members interested to learn more about getting started with community-based outreach, planning outcomes-based outreach projects, and collecting and analyzing evaluation data.

What You Will Get from the Experience:

  • The Planning & Evaluating Health Information Outreach Projects Booklets
  • Peer support for planning outreach to community partners
  • Independent study of booklets in advance of group discussion
  • 8 Medical Library Association CE units

Register on our training calendar.

You can attend all sessions, or teleconference of your choice. We hope you will attend all. Attendees who attend all four teleconferences may receive 8 Medical Library Association CE units (pending approval).

This project is led by Margot Malachowski (Baystate Health), Michelle Eberle (NN/LM NER), Cindy Olney (NN/LM OERC), and Karen Vargas (NN/LM OERC) and sponsored by the NN/LM Healthy Communities COI (Community of Interest).

Please visit WP-Admin > Options > Snap Shots and enter the Snap Shots key. How to find your key