Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About NER | Contact NER | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for the ‘Public Health’ Category

Office of Minority Health Resource Center

Thursday, July 16th, 2015

This week, I presented at the Office of Minority Health Resource Center’s Higher Education Technical Assistance Program. The HETAP workshop included a New England Region Federal Panel. I had the pleasure to connect with Regional Administrators for HHS, HRSA, and SAMHSA. Each presented shared an overview of their services and funding opportunities.

The OMHRC presented about the services they provide to the public such as research assistance to prepare grants. The OMHRC is the nation’s largest repository of information on health issues specific to African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Hispanics, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders. The OMRHC’s Information Services can help you identify the most current minority health data.

-Michelle Eberle

Description of the OMHRC
Source: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=2&lvlid=17

Information Services

The Office of Minority Health Resource Center researches and responds to telephone, e-mail and mail inquiries from the public. Examples of information we can assist with include database search results, funding sources and the most current data specific to a variety of health conditions and issues affecting racial and ethnic minorities.

All of our Information Specialists provide free, high-quality customized responses for health professionals, community/faith-based organizations, students, consumers and members of Congress on a variety of topics related to minority health and health disparities.

Information Specialists are available to provide searches on sources of federal and non-federal funding, the latest minority health research, and current data and statistics on a variety of health conditions and issues affecting racial and ethnic minorities. We are also able to provided limited quantities of consumer health publications.

The Office of Minority Health Resource Center is also a referral service and Information Specialists can provide free assistance referring clients to health information or to relevant health organizations.

How do I request information?
Call: 1-800-444-6472 (English and Spanish)
TDD: 301-251-1432
Email: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov
Mail: Office of Minority Health Resource Center
PO Box 37337
Washington, DC 20013-7337
The toll-free telephone line is staffed from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm eastern time, Monday through Friday (closed on federal holidays). The toll-free line is accessible within the continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

What kind of customized searches are available?
Information Specialists are available to offer the latest minority health information on a variety of health conditions and issues and resources. These searches include: current literature (research and peer review articles); national and local minority health data/statistics; and national and local resources, programs, events and materials for your community. Depending on the difficulty of the request, searches may take up to 5 business days to complete. An Information Specialist will work with you to make sure you receive the most accurate resources for your program.

Share Your Program Success Stories

Thursday, July 9th, 2015

The NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center’s Blog features two new posts about how to create a program success story.

I’m planning to use the CDC’s Story Builder to document a program success story from our New Hampshire State Library MedlinePlus Train-the-Trainer.  If you use the Story Builder, the OERC would love to hear about your experience.  Share your experience with Cindy Olney.  The OERC is always interested to publicize NN/LM Network Members program successes in their blog.  If you have a project success (that includes an assessment/evaluation component), please send your story to Cindy.

-Michelle Eberle

Sewell Stipends for APHA 2015

Wednesday, July 1st, 2015

The Sewell Travel Award for Public Health (STAPH) Committee is accepting applications for 2015 Sewell Stipends. The deadline for submission is July 15, 2015.

 

This year’s APHA meeting will take place in Chicago, IL from October 31 through November 4, 2015. The theme this year is Health in All Policies. For more information on the meeting see APHA’s website (https://www.apha.org/events-and-meetings/annual).

 

History and Purpose of the Sewell Fund

 

The late Dr. Winifred Sewell worked with several professional associations during her long career in medical and pharmacy librarianship/information technology. This led to her appreciation of the key role that librarians and information professionals can play in raising the quality of health care. Convinced that interacting with public health and pharmacy colleagues would forge a much deeper understanding of the users’ roles and needs, she established the Grace and Harold Sewell Memorial Fund, Inc. (The Fund) to provide financial support to librarians and information providers who plan to attend the annual meetings of the American Public Health Association and the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy.

 

The Fund aims to increase librarians’ effectiveness at providing reliable/relevant information to health care professionals in the fields of public health and pharmacy. To achieve this purpose, the Fund awards reimbursement funds to librarians and other information professionals to defray association membership/registration/travel and per diem expenses of attending and/or participating in activities of the American Public Health Association (APHA).

 

More information about the Sewell Fund can be found at the following sites:

http://www.phha.mlanet.org/blog/2015/sewell-stipend-to-attend-the-apha-annual-meeting-2015-call-for-applicants/

http://www.phha.mlanet.org/blog/activities/sewell-stipend/faq/

Climate Change and the Health of Americans

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015
[Guest post by NLM Outreach and Special Populations Branch]The July 2015 issue of The Nation’s Health features a cover story on the link between climate change and health, new U.S. government initiatives aimed at protecting communities from the health impacts of climate change, and the effort to reframe climate change as an urgent public health issue.“Health officials and scientists warn that a changing climate is leading to more extreme heat, poorer air quality, heavier rainfall, and more frequent and intense natural disasters — all of which have serious consequences for human health. And because children are so susceptible to environmental change, they stand to bear the brunt of climate-related disease and stress.”

The article identifies the need for government, health professionals, and people to act preventatively. It examines recent initiatives from President Barack Obama that relate to understanding, communicating and mitigating the health effects of climate change, including the April 6, 2015 White House Climate Change and Health Summit, and a new toolkit designed to help health care facilities prepare for climate change.

These initiatives are meant to help Americans understand climate change as not just an environmental issue, but also an important health issue.

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) provides many sources of information to assist health professionals with the knowledge and resources they need to assess who is most vulnerable to the health effects of climate change, and teach patients how to minimize the impacts.

The Division of Specialized Information Services (SIS) Arctic Health website is a central source for information on diverse aspects of the Arctic environment and the health of northern peoples. The site gives access to evaluated health information from hundreds of local, state, national, and international agencies, as well as from professional societies and universities. For example, the Arctic Health Climate Change page provides links to websites, publications, and multimedia presentations covering the impacts of climate change on the health, activities, and well-being of people in the Arctic. It includes climate-change observations from both the scientific-research and the traditional-knowledge points of view.

The SIS Environmental Health and Toxicology website features Enviro-Health Links – Climate Change and Human Health. This page provides a wealth of environmental health-related web resources from the U.S. government and other trusted sources focused on climate change and health. Resources include links to information about specific impacts on agriculture, extreme weather, general health, infectious disease, population displacement, preparedness and security, and water quality and scarcity. In addition to topic-related searches of NLM resources, the page offers overview materials, glossaries, information on law, policy, and regulation, links to blogs, news, podcasts and video, and educational material such as the NLM’s Environmental Health Student Portal.

Please visit WP-Admin > Options > Snap Shots and enter the Snap Shots key. How to find your key