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Archive for the ‘Public Health’ Category

AIDSinfo Releases Drug App for iOS and Android Devices

Friday, December 5th, 2014

AIDSinfo is pleased to announce the release of the AIDSinfo Drug App. Using data from the AIDSinfo Drug Database, the drug app provides information on more than 100 HIV-related approved and investigational drugs. The information, offered in English and Spanish, is tailored to meet the needs of both health care providers and consumers. The app is designed to automatically refresh when the user is connected to a wireless or cellular data network. The auto update feature eliminates the need to manually update the app to view the most current drug information. In addition, the app works offline, ensuring that health care providers and consumers can access vital drug information anywhere—even in health care facilities that may not have an Internet connection.

 

Health care providers surveyed on the AIDSinfo website indicated that access to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) labels for HIV-related drugs would be a useful feature of a drug app. Thus FDA drug labels pulled from DailyMed are integrated into the app in an easy-to-navigate format. This feature, coupled with the auto update feature, makes it easy for health care providers to quickly find the latest drug information when seeing patients. In addition, information from the FDA labels is condensed in easy-to-understand summaries in English and Spanish for consumers. The app also includes information on HIV-related investigational drugs for both health care providers and consumers.

Available for both iOS and Android devices, users can personalize the free AIDSinfo Drug App to suit their needs:

  • Receive notifications when content is updated.
  • Bookmark frequently referenced drugs for easy access at any time.
  • Add personal notes to any drug.
  • Select from a menu of alarms to set pill reminders for any drug.

Stay tuned for additions to the AIDSinfo Drug App.

Public Libraries and Improved Health

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

[Guest post from Deb Clark, Maine State Library]

Check out this radio show interview with Portland Public Library director, Steve Podgajny and Dr. Sam Zager formerly at Maine Medical Center which discusses the findings of the recent HeLPURS study showing a correlation between public library use and improvement in individual health. The HeLPURS radio interview (show #166)  will be streaming on the website at  http://themainemag.com/radio/

This important study demonstrates the value of public libraries in supporting healthy behavior change. It provides an opportunity for our libraries to show their worth to their communities as places which can assist users in their efforts to live healthier lifestyles, another way libraries strengthen their communities. Please take a few moments to listen to the program and think about how your library can provide health information and programming that promotes informed health decision-making and positive health behaviors. Here’s a summary of the study below. The results of the study are currently being prepared for publication.

Pioneering Research by Maine Physician Proves Link Between Public Library Use And Tobacco Cessation In Study Done In Collaboration With Portland Public Library

In 2010, a highly regarded group of physicians, brain scientists, social scientists, and other experts went on record with their expert opinion that public libraries likely promote health. One Maine physician has just completed the first-ever direct and broad research on the topic – and proved their instincts were on the right track.

Maine physician Dr. Sam Zager was the driving force behind the Health and Libraries of Public Use Retrospective Study (HeLPURS), the first broad investigation of health and public libraries. The study investigated whether a link between library use and health could be quantifiably established. Dr. Zager’s interest in the intersection of health and public library use grew out of his involvement in library advocacy efforts in Boston several years ago. He noticed that the prior research into health and libraries was sparse and narrowly focused on health literacy. No studies existed to determine the relationship between library use and individuals’ health profiles.

HeLPURS research was made possible through a collaboration with Portland Public Library, spearheaded by PPL’s Health and Institutional Research Teams and funded by a generous grant from the Anne Randolph Henry Charitable Foundation. Study participants were recruited from among a large pool of adult Maine Medical Center Family Medicine patients. Participants who were also PPL card holders granted permission for the Library to release information on frequency of their library use for correlation by Dr. Zager and his colleagues with their medical histories. Throughout the study, all privacy laws and human research ethics protocols as well as PPL privacy policies were strictly observed, and no personal borrowing history was ever queried.

The project results provide evidence that public library use has quantifiable associations with health, particularly in the areas of substance abuse and depression-anxiety disorders. The most dramatic finding is that moderate or higher use of public libraries is associated with tobacco cessation. Individuals who have ever been smokers and who used the library at least moderately – seven or more items checked out per active year – were nearly three times more likely to have successfully quit smoking, compared with smokers who used the library less.

“HeLPURS offers the first direct evidence that public libraries could be health-promoting spaces,” Zager says, “This was out-of-the-box thinking, but now these results beg for further research. The current findings also have important implications when estimating return on investment in public libraries in Maine and across the country.”

Zager’s sentiments are echoed by PPL Executive Director Steve Podgajny. “What the HeLPURS study does,” Podgajny observes, “is to clinically isolate a specific and very important health relationship that public libraries have with individuals and the community as a whole. The study has many ramifications one of which is how public libraries might serve more effectively as a vehicle for public health funding and goals.”

About Dr. Zager

Dr. Sam Zager is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, who holds an MD from Harvard University and an M.Phil. in Economic and Social History from Oxford University. His presentation on HeLPURS won top prize at the Maine Academy of Family Physicians Annual Conference last month. Dr. Zager has been a Family Medicine Resident Physician at Maine Medical Center since 2011, and he will begin practicing Family Medicine with Martin’s Point Healthcare starting in September 2014.

Post Contributed by:

Deborah A. Clark, Consultant

Southern Maine Library District

Portland Public Library

E-mail: deborah.clark@maine.gov

 

RHIN rebranded to HealthReach

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

The Refugee Health Information Network (RHIN) was a national collaborative partnership whose principal focus was to create and make available a database of quality multilingual/multicultural, public health resources to professionals providing care to resettled refugees and asylees. In October, 2014, NLM (SIS) broadened the scope of RHIN by rebranding it HealthReach. This was done to better meet the needs of the diverse non-English and English as a second language speaking audiences. HealthReach continues to recognize the importance of providing refugee and asylee specific information while expanding the information provided to meet the needs of most immigrant populations. Over the next several months we will be adding new resources and reaching out to stakeholders. Please use the new Twitter hand @NLM_HealthReach and use the new URL http://healthreach.nlm.nih.gov. We will be transferring from the .org to .gov site in the next several months. You will notice there isn’t much change between the old RHIN and the new HealthReach – this was intentional to help with the continuity of service through the transition. We appreciate any feedback you have!

[NLM Announcement]

Tracking Ebola in Liberia

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

Tracking Ebola in Liberia, American Libraries, October 3, 2014

The outbreak of Ebola in western Africa poses a serious threat to health in the region. Governments of the affected countries, as well as organizations such as the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have been working to control the deadly virus.

Information is an important tool in fighting the outbreak. Alison Blaine, a master’s student at the University of North Carolina School of Information and Library Science and a research assistant in the UNC Davis Library’s Research Hub, is part of an interdisciplinary team that developed ebolainliberia.org, a website that provides data and news about the Ebola epidemic. Blaine provided American Libraries her personal perspective on the project and the importance of visualizing data, as well as the role libraries can play in doing so.

See the full interview with Alison Blaine at http://www.americanlibrariesmagazine.org/article/tracking-ebola-Liberia

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