Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About NER | Contact NER | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for the ‘OERC’ Category

Improving Your Data Storytelling in 30 Days

Tuesday, August 25th, 2015

[guest post by Karen Vargas, OERC]

Here are some more great techniques to help with telling a story to report your evaluation data so it will get the attention it deserves.

Juice Analytics has this truly wonderful collection of resources in a guide called “30 Days to Data Storytelling.” With assignments of less than 30 minutes a day, this guide links to data visualization and storytelling resources from sources as varied as Pixar, Harvard Business Review, Ira Glass, the New York Times, and Bono (yes, that Bono).

The document is a checklist of daily activities lasting no longer than 30 minutes per day. Each activity is either an article to read, a video to watch, or a small project to do.

The resources answer valuable questions like:

  • What do you do when you’re stuck?
  • How do I decide between are some visual narrative techniques?
  • Where can I find some examples of using data visualization to tell a story?

Soup Up Your Annual Reports with Calculator Soup

Monday, August 17th, 2015

[guest post by Cindy Olney, OERC]

Summer is annual report time for our organization. Sometimes when I’m putting together my bulleted list of accomplishments for those reports, I feel as though our major wins get lost in the narrative. So I recently turned to an online calculator to help me create better metrics to talk about our center’s annual wins.

One of our objectives for the year was to increase participation in our evaluation training program. We developed new webinars based on our users’ feedback and also increased promotion of our training opportunities. The efforts paid off: training session attendance increased from 291 participants the previous year to 651 this year. Now that is a notable increase, but the numbers sort of disappear into the paragraph, don’t they? So I decided to add a metric to draw attention to this finding: Our participation rate increased 124% over last year’s attendance. Isn’t “percent increase” a simpler and more eye-catching way to express the same accomplishment?

Doing this extra analysis seems simple, but it takes time and gives me angst because it usually requires manual calculation. First I have to look up the formula somewhere. Then I have to calculate the statistic. Then I calculate it again, because I don’t trust myself. Then I calculate it again out of pure obsessiveness.

That’s why I love online calculators. Once I find one I like and test it for accuracy, I bookmark it for future use. From then on, I let the calculator do the computation because it is infinitely more reliable than I am when it comes to running numbers.

One of my favorite sites for online calculators is Calculator Soup, because it has so many of them. You may not ever use 90% of its calculators, but who knows when you might need to compute someone’s age from a birth date or convert days to hours. The calculators also show you the exact steps in their calculations. This allows you to check their work. You also can find formulas that you then can apply in an Excel spreadsheet.

One word of advice: test a calculator for accuracy before adopting it. I always test a new calculator to be sure the designers knew what they were doing. For Calculator Soup, I can vouch for the percent change and the mean/median/mode calculator. If I use any others at that site, I’ll test them as well. I’ll create an easy problem that I can solve manually and make sure my result matches the calculator’s.

If you want to see what Calculator Soup has to offer, check out their calculator index here.

How to Write a Mission Statement Without Losing Your Mind

Wednesday, August 12th, 2015

[guest post by Cindy Olney]

Mission statements are important. Organizations use them to declare to the world how their work matters. They are the North Star for employees, guiding their efforts toward supporting organizational priorities.  And mission statements are important to evaluators, because evaluation methods are ultimately designed to assess an organization’s value.  Having those values explicitly stated is very helpful.

Yet most of us would rather clean out the office refrigerator than participate in a mission-writing process. Now imagine involving 30 people in the writing process. Make that the refrigerator and the microwave, right?

That’s why I am so enthusiastic about the Nonprofit Hub’s document A Step-By-Step Exercise for Creating a Mission Statement, which the authors promise  is a tool “for those who want to skip the nitpicking, word choice arguments or needing to create the elusive ‘perfect mission statement.’”

I won’t go into details about how their process works, because the guide lays it out elegantly and concisely. You can read through the process in five minutes, it is so succinct.   I’ll just tell you what I like most:

  • The exercise reportedly takes 1-2 hours, even though you are engaging up to 30 stakeholders in the process.
  • Stories comprise the foundation of the mission statement: people start by sharing stories about the organization’s best work.
  • The individuals do group qualitative analysis on the stories to begin to understand the organization’s cause, activities, and impact.
  • Small groups draft mission statements, with instruction to write short, simple sentences. In fact, 10- word sentences are held up as an ideal. The small groups share back with the large group, where big ideas are identified and discussed.
  • The actual final wording is assigned to a small task force to create after the meeting, which prevents wordsmithing from dampening the momentum (and the mood).
  • In the end, everyone understands and endorses the mission statement because they helped develop it.

This exercise has potential that reaches beyond development of mission statements.  It would be a great exercise for advisory groups to contribute their ideas about future activities. Their advice will be based on your organization’s past successes.  The stories generated are data that can be analyzed for organizational impact.  If you are familiar with Appreciative Inquiry, you’ll recognize the AI influence in this exercise.

The group qualitative analysis process, alone, could be adapted to other situations (see steps 1 and 2).  For example, a small project team could use the process to analyze stories from interviews, focus groups, or even written comments to open-ended survey questions.

Even if mission statements are not on your horizon, check out the Nonprofit Hub’s document. There might be something you can adapt for future planning and evaluation projects.

 

A Rainbow Connection? The Evaluation Rainbow Framework

Wednesday, August 12th, 2015

[Guest post by Karen Vargas]

Once you start looking online for help with your evaluation project, you will find a veritable storm of evaluation resources out there. So many that it can be confusing how choose the best ones for your needs.  But don’t worry, once you’ve looked at this online tool you will find the rainbow of hope that follows the storm (okay that was pretty cheesy – stay with me, it gets better).

A group of evaluators from all over the world created a website called BetterEvaluation.org for the purpose of organizing and sharing useful online evaluation resources. The framework they created to organize resources is called the Rainbow Framework because it divides the world of evaluation into seven different “clusters” which are delineated by rainbow colors.  Each cluster is then broken down into a number of tasks, and each task broken down into options and resources.

Here is an example of the Rainbow Framework in action.  By clicking on the yellow “Describe” category, the image opens a window on the right that lists seven tasks: 1) Sample; 2) Use measures, indicators, or metrics; 3) Collect and/or retrieve data; 4) Manage data; 5) Combine qualitative and quantitative data; 6) Analyze data; and 7) Visualize data.

BetterEvaluation made eight 20 minute “coffee break” webinars in conjunction with AEA that you can watch for free on the BetterEvaluation website. Each webinar describes a cluster, and there is one overview webinar.  The webinars are two years old, so the actual image of the rainbow looks a little different from the webinar video, but the content is still relevant.  Here is a link to the webinar series: http://betterevaluation.org/events/coffee_break_webinars_2013

The Rainbow Framework does more than just organize resources. Here are some reasons you might want to use this Framework.

1) Help designing and planning an evaluation

2) Check the quality of an ongoing evaluation

3) Commission an evaluation – will help formulate what’s important to include when you commission an evaluator and then when you assess the quality of the proposals

4) Embed stakeholder participation thoughtfully throughout the evaluation

5) Develop your evaluation capacity – lifelong learning – to fill in gaps of knowledge.

So, somewhere over the rainbow, your evaluation skies may be blue…

Please visit WP-Admin > Options > Snap Shots and enter the Snap Shots key. How to find your key