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Archive for the ‘OERC’ Category

Logic Models for Library Assessment Planning

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014

The Engaged Librarian: Crafting an Effective Assessment Plan to Determine the Impact of a Key Strategic Library Initiative by Sarah Murphy at The Ohio State University (OSU) was presented during the Library Assessment Conference and provided an overview to the use of a logic model as part of library strategic planning. Ms. Murphy’s presentation slides are available by clicking here

Their project incorporated the theory of change methodology with logic models and used the Kellogg Foundation Logic Model as a template. They storyboarded data within a data dashboard that was both aligned with and broken down by the applicable OSU strategic vision goals. Ms. Murphy reported that the benefits of using a logic model approach included having a flexible but structured way to do library assessment planning, having a collaborative and inclusive approach, creating a project focus, being able to assess linear and iterative programs and services, and the ability to communicate program accomplishments in interesting ways. During the question and answer session they noted they are also Tableau fans (we will write about Tableau for our next post) and like to create data structures in their dashboard to avoid information silos.

If you’d like to learn more about logic models and data dashboards, be sure to check out our freely available Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) Evaluation Guides, especially Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Projects. We also offer Data Dashboards: Monitoring Progress toward Program Outcomes as one of our webinars and a recording of Data Dashboards is available by clicking here.

Logic Models for Library Assessment Planning

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014

The Engaged Librarian: Crafting an Effective Assessment Plan to Determine the Impact of a Key Strategic Library Initiative by Sarah Murphy at The Ohio State University (OSU) was presented during the Library Assessment Conference and provided an overview to the use of a logic model as part of library strategic planning. Ms. Murphy’s presentation slides are available by clicking here

Their project incorporated the theory of change methodology with logic models and used the Kellogg Foundation Logic Model as a template. They storyboarded data within a data dashboard that was both aligned with and broken down by the applicable OSU strategic vision goals. Ms. Murphy reported that the benefits of using a logic model approach included having a flexible but structured way to do library assessment planning, having a collaborative and inclusive approach, creating a project focus, being able to assess linear and iterative programs and services, and the ability to communicate program accomplishments in interesting ways. During the question and answer session they noted they are also Tableau fans (we will write about Tableau for our next post) and like to create data structures in their dashboard to avoid information silos.

If you’d like to learn more about logic models and data dashboards, be sure to check out our freely available Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) Evaluation Guides, especially Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Projects. We also offer Data Dashboards: Monitoring Progress toward Program Outcomes as one of our webinars and a recording of Data Dashboards is available by clicking here.

Webinar: Data Burger: A “Good” Questionnaire Response Rate plus Basic Quantitative Data Analysis

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

National Network of Libraries of Medicine, New England Region’s Health Care Workforce COI presents an upcoming webinar:

Data Burger: A “Good” Questionnaire Response Rate plus Basic Quantitative Data Analysis
Presenter: Nikki Dettmar, Evaluation Librarian, NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center
When: June 24, 2014 at 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST
Where: http://nnlm.gov/ner/training/register.html?schedule_id=2925

Many of us use questionnaires to learn about our stakeholders’ attitudes and knowledge. Let’s picture this as a burger: The data we collect is like the meat in the filling, and we wrap the data in a tasty bun (summaries, graphs, and charts) to present it.

Meat: We want to use the best ingredients for our filling and collect good data. The question “What is a ‘good’ response rate?” often comes up. What does “response rate” mean, and why is it important? And how do you know what your response rate is? We’ll go over practical steps you can take to increase the number of people who complete and return the questionnaires that you send to them. We’ll also talk about some strategies for addressing low response rates.

Bun: Once you have administered a questionnaire, what do you do with all those numbers? The next section of this webinar will be about preparing and presenting those numbers. It will provide a very quick review of basic quantitative data analysis, including descriptive statistics and suggestions for selecting types of charts or graphs to illustrate your data.

New SurveyMonkey mobile app

Monday, April 14th, 2014

Attention iPad and iPhone users: SurveyMonkey recently launched a mobile app so you can create, send, and monitor your surveys from your phone or tablet. The app is free, although you need a SurveyMonkey account to use it.

With the SurveyMonkey app, you no longer have to rely on your computer to design and manage a survey. The app also allows you to conveniently view your data from any location with Internet access. I think the most notable benefit is that the analytic reports are optimized for mobile devices and are easy to read on small screens.

I have been asked how this app compares to QuickTapSurvey (see my previous blog entry). In my opinion, the app does not make SurveyMonkey comparable to QuickTapSurvey, which is designed specifically to collect onsite visitor feedback in informal settings such as exhibits and museums. SurveyMonkey, by comparison, is designed to collect data through email, web sites, or social media. Both apps work best in their respective settings. I think you could adapt SurveyMonkey to collect data at face-to-face events (if there is onsite Internet access), but it probably won’t work as smoothly as QuickTapSurvey.

For more information about the Survey Monkey mobile app, click here.

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