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Archive for the ‘OERC’ Category

More Qualitative Data Visualization Ideas

Friday, December 19th, 2014

In September, we blogged about a way to create qualitative data visualizations by chunking a long narrative into paragraphs with descriptive illustrations.

Ann Emery has shown six additional ways to create qualitative data visualization: 1) Strategic world cloud use (one word or before/after comparisons), 2) Quantitative + Qualitative combined (a graph of percentages and a quote from an open-ended text comment) 3) Photos alongside participant responses (only appropriate for non-anonymized data) 4) Icon images beside text narratives 5) Diagrams explaining processes or concepts (the illustration of a health worker’s protective gear from Ebola in the Washington Post is a great example) and 6) Graphic timelines. See these examples and overviews on how to make your own at  http://annkemery.com/qual-dataviz/

Do you need more information about reporting and visualizing your data? We at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) have more resources available for you from the Reporting and Visualizing tab of our Tools and Resources for Evaluation Guide at http://guides.nnlm.gov/oerc/tools and welcome your suggestions for additional resources to include and your comments.

Story-telling Report Writing

Thursday, December 18th, 2014

Check out this helpful and fun webinar presented by the OERC.

Once upon a time, there was an evaluation report that people actually read.

Date: February 14, 2013
Hosted by the Healthy Communities and Health Literacy COIs
Guest Speaker: Cindy Olney, NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center

Sound like a fairy tale? Exactly! A report format that follows a typical story-telling structure can help you communicate your project’s story so that stakeholders may actually pay attention. In this format, you use evaluation data to complement, not overpower, the most important messages you want to convey. The OERC’s, Cindy Olney will describe how to use a story format to report evaluation findings. This format can be adapted for written reports, presentations, and even elevator speeches.

Literature Search Strategy Week at AEA

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

We at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) have previously covered the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) tip-a-day blog at http://aea365.org/blog as a helpful resource. This week posts about literature search strategies were shared on the AEA blog by Network member librarians from the Lamar Soutter Library at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Have you been involved in a similar collaboration? Please let us know, we’d love to feature your work in a future OERC blog post!

Literature Search Strategy Week

  1. Best Databases – learn the most effective starting points for biomedical, interdisciplinary, specialized, and a handy Top Ten list of literature databases.
  2. Constructing a Literature Search – learn the value of a vocabulary roadmap, and the difference between keyword and controlled vocabulary searching.
  3. Grey Literature – strategies for understanding these non-traditional but highly valuable information resources and starting points on where to find them.
  4. Using MyNCBI – learn how to sign up for your free account, save your PubMed search strategies, receive email updates, customize your display and more.
  5. Citation Management – featuring both freely available and other options you may have access to through your academic organizations.

Elegantly Simple Evaluation

Friday, September 19th, 2014

The NER’s Health Literacy COI was featured in the OERC’s blog:

Elegantly Simple Evaluation: Documenting Outcomes of a New England Health Literacy Project

For an example of an elegantly simple program evaluation that yielded great results, check out an article by Michelle Eberle and colleagues in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine New England Region, which appeared in the August 2014 edition of MLA News . The article describes the region’s Clear: Conversationsproject, a collaboration among five organizations in which librarians and health professionals taught health literacy skills to patients. This innovative project, originated by Health Care Missouri, featured role-plays of patients in which they practice good patient communication skills during a visit to a health care provider (played by volunteers from various health professions).

This project shows that a few relatively simple evaluation activities can clearly show the positive outcomes of a project. For example, after their role-play, participants gave high ratings to their satisfaction with the information they received during their “doctor visit.”   When completing the multi-session program, a strong majority said the program improved their comfort with employing effective communication techniques with their own health care providers. More than half of respondents completing the second questionnaire described specific actions they intended to use in future visits to health care providers. Also, the health professional role-players provided their own feedback about how their experiences would affect their own interactions with patients.

The evaluation methods used for the Clear: Conversations project were fairly simple, but well-planned. Eberle and her colleagues developed their evaluation methods in the project planning stage and consulted with the NN/LM OERC on method design. As a result, the team was able to collect information that clearly demonstrated, both to themselves and others, the value of their project.

The OERC would like to highlight more examples of evaluations that are both effective and relatively easy to implement.  If you know of other projects that we can showcase in our Elegantly Simple Evaluation series, please contact Cindy Olney at olneyc@uw.edu.

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