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Archive for the ‘NLM Resources’ Category

NLM NTC Assistant Director Job Opening

Thursday, April 23rd, 2015

Assistant Director, National Library of Medicine Training Center

The Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah seeks an imaginative team leader with progressive ideas to lead the National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC). The Assistant Director reports directly to the Associate Director of the NN/LM MidContinental Region. The Assistant Director plans and implements the activity of the NTC; supervises NTC professional and support staff; and, in conjunction with National Library of Medicine staff, coordinates the activities of the NTC with other components of the NN/LM program, in order to support the effective use of NLM information products and services.  With the NTC team, the Assistant Director assures compliance with all elements of the Statement of Work that is part of the contract with the National Library of Medicine and develops and implements a strategic program plan for the NTC, including the appropriate assessment and evaluation of instruction. The individual in this position prepares an annual budget and supervises the timely delivery of class reports, quarterly reports, annual reports, and evaluation reports. The Assistant Director conducts online and in-person training classes throughout the United States on PubMed, TOXNET and other topics related to training and NLM resources and coordinates NCBI training. The NTC web site, social media plan, and national and regional class registration system falls under the Assistant Director’s supervision.  Responsibilities also include monitoring new developments related to NLM products and services and monitoring, disseminating and incorporating new information and trends related to distance learning, adult learning and instruction.

Salary and Benefits:

Based on experience, starting at $73,000 minimum annually. Position is a full-time, non-tenure track faculty position. Rank is dependent on the qualifications of the candidate. Faculty benefits include 200 hours of vacation, and 12 days of sick leave annually. There is a generous TIAA/ CREF retirement employer contribution. More information may be found in the University of Utah Faculty Handbook: http://admin.utah.edu/faculty-handbook. See https://www.hr.utah.edu/benefits/ for a full list of benefits.

Application Instructions:

To apply, please go to the University’s Careers page. Quick link for Posting is – http://utah.peopleadmin.com/postings/40608

Review of Applications: Review of application begins May 27, 2015.

If you have any questions about this position announcement or on applying online, please contact:

Claire Hamasu, Search Committee Chair
Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library
10 N. 1900 E. Salt Lake City, UT 84112
801-581-3412 Option #1
chamasu@RML4.utah.edu

Affirmative Action Statement

The University of Utah is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer and does not discriminate based upon race, national origin, color, religion, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, status as a person with a disability, genetic information, or Protected Veteran status. Individuals from historically underrepresented groups, such as minorities, women, qualified persons with disabilities and protected veterans are encouraged to apply. Veterans’ preference is extended to qualified applicants, upon request and consistent with University policy and Utah state law. Upon request, reasonable accommodations in the application process will be provided to individuals with disabilities. To inquire about the University’s nondiscrimination or affirmative action policies or to request disability accommodation, please contact: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, 201 S. Presidents Circle, Rm 135, (801) 581-8365.

The University of Utah values candidates who have experience working in settings with students from diverse backgrounds, and possess a strong commitment to improving access to higher education for historically underrepresented students.

The University of Utah Health Sciences Center is a patient focused center distinguished by collaboration, excellence, leadership, and Respect.  The University of Utah HSC values candidates who are committed to fostering and furthering the culture of compassion, collaboration, innovation, accountability, diversity, integrity, quality, and trust that is integral to the mission of the University of Utah Health Sciences Center.

Claire Hamasu, Associate Director
NN/LM MidContinental Region
University of Utah Eccles Health Sciences Library
10 North 1900 East Bldg 589
Salt Lake City UT 84112-5890
Voice 800 338-7657 (CO,KS,MO,NE,UT,WY) #1, #1
Voice 801 587-3412, Option #1
Fax 801 581 3632
chamasu@rml4.utah.edu

Webinar 4/30/15: Learn more about EFTS

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

Learn more about the Electronic Funds Transfer System (EFTS) Who benefits and How?

 

Jola Sliwinski, EFTS Program Coordinator, will be presenting an informative session on the Electronic Funds Transfer System (EFTS.) Participating DOCLINE libraries primarily use the system. Jola will present an overview and the advantages of using the system.  She will available to answer any questions.

 

Who: For DOCLINE participants not currently using EFTS and/or for current users. Anyone interested in the program is welcome.

 

When : Thursday, April 30, 2015, 1 pm Mountain Time / 2 pm Central Time / 3pm Eastern Time

Where:  https://webmeeting.nih.gov/memberservices

 

Log in as a “Guest” and receive prompts for the audio portion after entering the room. Captioning will be provided for both sessions and recordings will be archved.

Webinar 4/29/15: Linkout!-Harnessing the power of LinkOut for libraries

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

LinkOut! : Harnessing the Power of LinkOut for Libraries

 

Tammy Magid will be facilitating a webinar that focuses on “LinkOut for Libraries” services to provide user’s access to online full-text at the point of need – it’ll be a librarian’s primer on “LinkOut for Libraries” services, tools, and customer support services. This presentation will include a brief question and answer session for participants.

 

Tammy A. Magid, MLIS works as a Technical Information Specialist at the National Library of Medicine where she serves as the NLM LinkOut Coordinator and Team Lead.

 

When: Wednesday, April 29, 2015,   12 pm Mountain Time, 1 pm Central Time, 2 pm Eastern Time

 

Who: For those who use LinkOut or anyone else who wants to learn more about the technology.

 

Where: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/memberservices

 

Log in as a “Guest” and receive prompts for the audio portion after entering the room. Captioning will be provided for both sessions and recordings will be archved.

Improving the Health Experience

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

The HxRefactored Conference brings together designers, health care providers, public health professionals, and others interested in the intersection of design and technology for a cross-disciplinary exploration of ways to improve the health experience. On April 1st and 2nd, I attended the conference in Boston, Massachusetts sponsored by MadPow and Health 2.0

The conference was jam-packed with inspiring presentations on topics including human centered design/usability, technology, health literacy/equity, mindfulness/stress reduction, behavior change, patient activism, electronic health records and organizational design.  Presenters shared ways to use design and technology to improve the health experience.  I hope you find these summaries of keynote presentations food for thought on creative ways to improve the health experience.

Keynotes ~ April 1, 2015

John Brownstein, Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School and the Computational Epidemiology Group at Children’s Hospital, explored the intersection of data and design for disease prevention in his keynote.  He asked, “How do we make everyone a stakeholder in public health?”  He shared real time detection of public health issues through social media platforms like HealthMap; StreetRx; and MEDWATCHER.  He also discussed new technology like iThermometer, a wearable thermometer that alerts parents of their child’s fever on their smartphone.   His presentation made me think about ways librarians can get involved with the development of social media platforms and new technologies to support public health.

Darshan Mehta, from MGH’s Benson-Henry Institute for Mind and Body Medicine, discussed how to build resiliency with an introduction to the relaxation response.  I’ve been practicing meditation since high school.  I enjoyed his guided relaxation.  It was a nice way to start the first day of the conference.  Mehta spoke about how meditation increases the cortical thickness and can change gene expression.  According to Mehta, mind/body practices reduce the frequency of medical symptoms, decrease the severity of psychiatric symptoms, and increase healthy lifestyles.  This presentation may inspire me to initiate a weekly mindfulness meditation group here at UMassMed School.

Keynotes ~ April 2, 2015

Steve Krug, author of Don’t Make Me Think and Rocket Surgery Made Easy, kicked off day two of the conference.  He only had twenty minutes but led a DIY (do-it-yourself) usability testing example with a volunteer from the audience.  His recommended DIY testing, preferably once a month on the same day – and stick to it!  Also, make it a spectator sport and have as many people as possible come watch.  Then, more people on your staff gain skill in usability testing.  For more information, check out his site, Advanced Common Sense

 Deborah Estrin, Professor of Computer Science  from Cornell NYC Tech, presented on small data.  She talked about using mHealth and small health to create data driven feedback loops of health.  She urged us to invest in interoperable and iterative approaches to benefit from reuse of tools and techniques.  She asked us: “How can we help create resources to help patients answer the question: are you feeling better?”  For examples of such resources, she mentioned Paragon Measure (turning mobile device use into actionable insights) and Ginger.io (using smartphones to improve mental health care).  She wrapped up by urging attendees to create an ecosystem around small data.

John Halamka, Chief Information Officer at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Chairman of the New England Healthcare Exchange Network, spoke about what’s new in HealthIT in 2015.  I’m sure many of you remember his excellent presentation at the NAHSL Annual Conference.  He discussed the federal interoperability roadmap, meaningful use stage 3, new mobile devices, private security challenges and the return to private sector innovation.  I was pleased to hear him mention National Library of Medicine’s free access to vocabulary standards for interoperability.  I was tweeting during the conference and my tweet with the link to NLM’s free APIs (application programming interfaces) was my most retweeted and favorited tweet of the conference.  Interested to learn more?  Check out how the NLM APIs can be used to support electronic health record certification and meaningful use.

Geoff Williams, of the University of Rochester Healthy Living Center Motivation Research Group, spoke about self-determination theory and how people change. He asked,”Does it come from the inside or outside?”  He told us about the psychological needs to support optimal health such as autonomy, competence, and feeling connected to others.

Jared Spool, author of Web Anatomy and Web Site Usability, declared design, “the rendering of intent.”  He asked: “What is the experience we want them to have?  Are we designing activities or experiences?”  He discussed a design process for the design experience and the importance of facilitated leadership.   According to Spool, “The best design teams worship inclusiveness.”

Julian Treasure, Master of Sound and author of Sound Business, was one of my favorite HxR presenters.  He told us the noise is the number one complaint in the hospital experience, the number one problem with productivity in the workplace, and that elevated noise leads to worse health.  He recommended improving acoustics, reducing noises, and designing soundscapes. He shared acronyms to help us learn to listen better and speak powerfully.  He wrapped up with a vocal toolbox activity.  If you are curious to learn more, listen to his TedTalk.

The HxR conference was full of creative and practical ways to improve the health experience. I left inspired to bring what I learned back to our network.  I learned about some amazing presenters that we might be able to host for regional conferences and webinars. I found it an insightful, useful conference and highly recommend it.  Stay tuned for my next blog post about what I learned at the breakout sessions.

Thanks MadPow and Health2.0 for a great conference!

 

 

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