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Archive for the ‘PubMed’ Category

Register for the PubMed® for Trainers Class in June (It’s free!)

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

Offered by the National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC)

Would you like to gain new skills, brush up on existing PubMed skills and collaborate with colleagues to help create effective training strategies?  The NTC, along with the Community College of Rhode Island Library in Lincoln, RI, is offering PubMed® for Trainers (PMT).

PMT is held in 4 sessions; 3 online and 1 in person session (attendance in all is expected). The last of the four sessions will be in-person at the Community College of Rhode Island Library in Lincoln, RI.  

This hands-on course consists of 9 presentations created by the National Library of Medicine, live demonstrations, hands-on exercises, group work and discussions, and networking opportunities over the course of four sessions.  You can expect an additional 2-3 hours of independent homework.  Upon completion of the class, participants receive 15 hours of MLA CE credit.

By the end of the course, you should:

Have a functional knowledge of the MEDLINE database

  • Understand behind the scenes details of how PubMed translates your search
  • Know how to use Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)
  • Increase your knowledge of how to more effectively search for drugs, diseases, and patient centered research.

The dates and times for the four class sessions are:

Thursday, June 5, 2014, 1-3 pm ET (online via Adobe Connect)

  1. Thursday, June 12, 2014, 1-3 pm ET (online via Adobe Connect)
  2. Thursday, June 19, 2014, 1-3 pm ET (online via Adobe Connect)
  3. Friday, June 27, 9 am -4:30 pm ET (in-person in Lincoln, Rhode Island)

For more information and to register, visit http://nnlm.gov/ntcc/classes/class_details.html?class_id=359

I would highly recommend this course to anyone who teaches PubMed.” 

“You all did an amazing job of (1) modeling instructional design by providing a very well-designed course; and, (2) demonstrating how online instructional environments can still provide engaging learning experiences.”

 “I really learned a lot of new information about how to search PubMed and good ideas for how to best teach that to my students.

                                     –Comments from recent “PubMed for Trainers” participants

 

PubMed Commons Project

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

PubMed Commons, a new feature of PubMed which allows commenting on articles, is now live. All authors of publications cited in PubMed are eligible to participate. They can comment on any article in PubMed, rate the helpfulness of comments, and invite other authors cited in PubMed to join. Links to other articles can be embedded in the comments, using a PubMed ID number. You can also set up alerts for articles with comments using your MyNCBI account. Those who are not authors can still view the comments on articles, and there is a new filter available called Reader Comments, which can be applied to search results. It’s also possible to view all the comments in PubMed (433 at this writing): Find all PubMed Citations with comments. We hope that PubMed Commons will lead to open communication and enhance the scholarly record. To participate, see How to Join PubMed Commons. Follow PubMed Commons on Twitter, and read the PubMed Commons blog for additional information.

Resource Updates August 2012

Monday, August 13th, 2012

New app for Guide to NLM Mobile Resources

NLM recently released a new mobile app that is intended to serve as the authoritative guide to NLM mobile resources. The app was created as an HTML 5 mobile Web site in support of the Library’s ongoing efforts to make our information broadly available. Learn more about this new resource via the NLM Technical Bulletin article at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/ja12/ja12_nlm_mobile_app.html.

To explore the app, visit http://www.nlm.nih.gov/mobile-app/ on your mobile device.

The Library welcomes your feedback about this new app at http://apps2.nlm.nih.gov/mainweb/siebel/nlm/index.cfm or via the Contact Us link in the footer of the app.

What’s New in PMC: Another Name and Another Facelift

PMC (formerly known as PubMed Central) has shortened its name in order to avoid confusion with PubMed. What’s also new is PMC’s look and feel, which has been updated to conform to NCBI’s new standards for page design. This redesign allows for a cleaner and more uniform presentation across PMC’s site as well as its article, issue and journal archive pages.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/ja12/ja12_pmc_redesign.html

Have you checked out “The learn about drugs” page of the NLM?

You can find LactMed information here http://www.nlm.nih.gov/learn-about-drugs.html.

That’s right, this page is a gateway to a comprehensive list of databases and web sites to help you become and stay informed about prescription drugs, over the counter drugs, supplements and other medications or remedies you want or need to know about.

It’s like shelf reading except you don’t have to tilt your head.

Need help with learning PubMed? Arlene Freed says: “Call Me!”

Monday, August 13th, 2012

When asked what does Arlene Freed do for the NN/LM NER, she reponded:

“I answer questions on searching PubMed and general questions about PubMed.  Librarians can call or email me.  I respond quickly and cheerfully!”

NN/LM NER has enlisted Arlene Freed, an instructional consultant, to provide individual consultations to network member to better understand PubMed database changes and functionality.

Since becoming an Instructional Consultant, Arlene has done webinars for member libraries like Aroostook Medical Center and Kennebec Valley Community College. At the request of UConn HealthNet, Arlene recently taught PubMed to public librarians at Connecticut State Library.

Having spent more than 20 years at Hartford Hospital Health Science Libraries, she says:

“I came to medical librarianship circuitously and brought all my previous skills to this wonderful profession.  Though I am retired from full time work, I’m not ready to completely retire from a profession that I love.”

Having been a web resource librarian, Arlene loves ending each of her instructional sessions with a web resource that might interest librarians.  Arlene offered this advice and resource tip: “… administrators, department heads and others in hospitals may be thinking about more than medicine. The business of medicine and healthcare is on everyone’s minds” Arlene recommends a resource like the Health Affairs blog (http://healthaffairs.org/blog) as a reliable source for health administration, policy, and research.”

What does Arlene do when she isn’t imparting her love and passion for the profession?  Currently living in Boston, she and her husband, David, walk everywhere exploring all Boston has to offer, often finding that there are more to do than one has time.

To get in contact with Arlene Freed, you can email her at arfreed@yahoo.com or contact us at nnlm-ner@umassmed.edu.

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