Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About NER | Contact NER | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for the ‘Healthy Communities’ Category

Elegantly Simple Evaluation

Friday, September 19th, 2014

The NER’s Health Literacy COI was featured in the OERC’s blog:

Elegantly Simple Evaluation: Documenting Outcomes of a New England Health Literacy Project

For an example of an elegantly simple program evaluation that yielded great results, check out an article by Michelle Eberle and colleagues in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine New England Region, which appeared in the August 2014 edition of MLA News . The article describes the region’s Clear: Conversationsproject, a collaboration among five organizations in which librarians and health professionals taught health literacy skills to patients. This innovative project, originated by Health Care Missouri, featured role-plays of patients in which they practice good patient communication skills during a visit to a health care provider (played by volunteers from various health professions).

This project shows that a few relatively simple evaluation activities can clearly show the positive outcomes of a project. For example, after their role-play, participants gave high ratings to their satisfaction with the information they received during their “doctor visit.”   When completing the multi-session program, a strong majority said the program improved their comfort with employing effective communication techniques with their own health care providers. More than half of respondents completing the second questionnaire described specific actions they intended to use in future visits to health care providers. Also, the health professional role-players provided their own feedback about how their experiences would affect their own interactions with patients.

The evaluation methods used for the Clear: Conversations project were fairly simple, but well-planned. Eberle and her colleagues developed their evaluation methods in the project planning stage and consulted with the NN/LM OERC on method design. As a result, the team was able to collect information that clearly demonstrated, both to themselves and others, the value of their project.

The OERC would like to highlight more examples of evaluations that are both effective and relatively easy to implement.  If you know of other projects that we can showcase in our Elegantly Simple Evaluation series, please contact Cindy Olney at olneyc@uw.edu.

Environmental Health Student Resources

Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

The National Library of Medicine has several online environmental health student resources that serve students from grades 1-12.  The information and data in these resources are free and vetted by science professionals.  The resources are versatile and can be used by science educators in their classrooms, in afterschool programs, in home school programs and by students for their academic research assignments.  We encourage you to use these resources and recommend them to interested groups.

NLM Environmental Health Student Resources:

  • ToxMystery (Grades 1-5): Interactive Web site that teaches elementary school students about toxic substances in the home.  Includes lesson plans and activities.  Also available in Spanish.
  • Environmental Health Student Portal (Grades 6-8): Provides middle school students and educators with information on common environmental health topics such as water pollution, climate change, air pollution, and chemicals.
  • Household Products Database (Grades 6-12+): Learn about the potential health effects of chemicals in common household products ranging from personal hygiene products to landscape care products.
  • ToxTown (Grades 6-12+): Interactive guide to commonly encountered toxic substances.  Includes classroom materials.  Also available in Spanish.
  • Native Voices Exhibition Lesson Plans & Activities (Grades 6-12): The lesson plans and activities familiarize students with Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian healthcare by using the NLM Native Voices exhibition Web site content materials.
  • TOXMAP (Grades 9-12+): Uses maps of the United States to visually explore Superfund and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) sites and data from the EPA.  Includes classroom materials.
  • Toxicology Tutorials (Grades 9-12+): Written at the introductory college student level; tutorials teach basic toxicology principles.

 

Dylan Rain Tree
Social Science Program Specialist
National Library of Medicine
(301) 451-2789, Office
dylan.raintree@nih.gov

New Knowledge Path from MCH Library

Monday, September 15th, 2014

[Shared on behalf of Susan Brune Lorenzo, MLS @ MCH Library at Georgetown University]

Health and Wellness for Adolescent Girls and Women with Mental and Behavioral Health Conditions Knowledge Path

The Women’s Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) Project at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Maternal and Child Health Library (MCH Library) at Georgetown University, both of whom are funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB), released a new knowledge path, Health and Wellness for Adolescent Girls and Women with Mental and Behavioral Health Conditions.  The knowledge path aims to bridge the public health and mental health information needs of professionals on approaches to promoting optimal health and wellness for women of childbearing age who experience a mental, emotional, or behavioral health condition. The knowledge path covers topics relevant to health promotion and disease prevention for all women, and specifically for women with mental and behavioral health disorders. Topics include: reproductive and maternal health, intentional injury, chronic conditions, healthy behaviors, and health disparities. Contents include websites, distance!

learning tools, reports, data and statistics, journal articles and other literature and research, and guides on related topics. The knowledge path is available at http://www.mchlibrary.org/KnowledgePaths/kp_WISH.html

A separate brief presents resources for women and their families. The brief is available at http://www.mchlibrary.org/families/frb_WISH.html

We welcome your comments and would appreciate your help in sharing this information with your colleagues via your website, social media, or e-news services.

 

Compelling Counts

Wednesday, September 10th, 2014

Webinar, Compelling Counts: Trends in Evaluation Data Reporting
Date: Tuesday, September 23, 2014
Time: 2 – 3 PM ET

The presentation will highlight trends in evaluation information use that make evaluation reports more engaging for different stakeholder audiences. Presented by the Cindy Olney, NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center. This webinar is sponsored by the Healthy Communities, Community of Interest.

Participants will be awarded 1 Medical Library Association CE unit, which may be applied to the Consumer Health Information Specialization (MLA CHIS).

Please register here.

Please visit WP-Admin > Options > Snap Shots and enter the Snap Shots key. How to find your key