Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About NER | Contact NER | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for the ‘Health Literacy’ Category

Take Action: Be a Health Literacy Hero

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, New England Region invites you to attend a free workshop for librarians and others interested to learn more about health literacy.

Keynote Speaker: Helen Osborne, http://www.healthliteracy.com/
Date: Thursday, December 4, 2014 (snow date: December 5)
Location: University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester
Time: 9:30 AM – 2:15 PM

Register here.

Bring a colleague! We encourage you to invite a current or potential health literacy project partner.

Agenda

Continental breakfast (9 – 9:30 AM)

Health Literacy: What It Is, Why It Matters, How You Can Help (9:30 AM -11 AM)

Helen Osborne will present an overview about health literacy, highlighting not only what it is and why it matters but also how health science librarians and their clinical colleagues can help. The goal is for participants to gain a clearer understanding about the importance of health literacy and an eagerness to explore ways of taking action. Topics include:

  • What health literacy is and why it matters in treatment and care.
  • Six factors that can affect an individual’s health understanding.
  • Best practices and practical strategies to improve health literacy.

Conversation with Librarians about Health Literacy (11:15 AM – 12:15 PM)

Explore how librarians contribute to health literacy. Michelle Eberle will highlight strategies for librarians and information professionals outlined in the National Action Plan for Health Literacy. Helen Osborne will facilitate a conversation with three librarians with expertise in providing health literacy services. Speakers include:

  • Irena Bond, Library Manager, Blais Family Library, MCPHS University
  • Margo Coletti, Director IS/ Knowledge Services, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
  • Anne Conner, Director, Gale Medical Library, Littleton Regional Healthcare
  • Nancy Goodwin, Director, Library and Knowledge Services, Middlesex Hospital

Lunch (12:15 – 1 PM) Book signing with Helen Osborne author of, Health Literacy from A-Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message

Take action: Be a Health Literacy Hero (1 PM – 2:15 PM)

In this dynamic session, Helen Osborne will lead a series of activities designed to help participants move from general health literacy know-how to specific and realistic action planning. Topics include:

  • Identifying key concepts heard, learned, or introduced to today.
  • Brainstorming effective and practical ways to improve health understanding.
  • Overcoming obstacles when putting health literacy into practice.
  • Identifying at least one action to take as a result of today’s conference. In other words, finding ways to be a Health Literacy Hero.

About Helen Osborne:

Helen is the president of Health Literacy Consulting based in Natick, Massachusetts. She produces and hosts the Health Literacy Out Loud podcast. She is also the founder of Health Literacy Month – a worldwide campaign to raise awareness about the importance of understandable health information. Helen’s award-winning book, Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message is considered by many as the most important health literacy reference today.

Details: Parking vouchers and lunch will be provided.

Travel reimbursement:  We can fund travel expenses for several librarians.  If you are interested to apply for travel reimbursement, please send Michelle Eberle a letter about your interest in the event, how you will apply what you learn,  and your reimbursement request (# of miles and if you need a hotel).

Sponsored by: the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, New England Region’s Health Literacy Community of Interest and the Peters Health Sciences Library at Rhode Island Hospital

Conference Planners:  Anne-Marie Kaminsky and Michelle Eberle

 

 

NAHSL Annual Conference CE Workshops

Thursday, September 25th, 2014

The NAHSL CE Committee invites you to attend upcoming Medical Library Association CE workshops at the NAHSL Annual Conference in Rockport, Maine.  MLA CE helps you earn or maintain Medical Library Association AHIP (Academy of Health Information Professionals) or CHIS (Consumer Health Information Specialization) status.

Register here for the NAHSL Conference and CE opportunities.

Sunday, October 19, 8:00 am to noon

Concepts in Genetics 

Continuing our series of clinical classes, this will cover basic concepts in genetics. The material presented will coordinate with the afternoon class, Introduction to Genetics Databases.

Presenter: Susan McClatchy is a bioinformatician and research program manager at the Center for Genome Dynamics at the Jackson Laboratory, one of fifteen National Centers of Excellence in Systems Biology. She teaches Independent Studies in Computational Biology, a research course for talented youth. She received the AAAS Science Prize for Inquiry-Based Instruction in May 2013, and enjoys working and teaching at the interface of biology, computing, and math.

Simply Put: Writing in Plain Language 

Participants will identify the problem of low health literacy, its definition, and how it impacts patient outcomes. Using three broad principles of writing in plain language they will critique and rewrite poorly worded sentences and brainstorm in small groups how to rewrite a sample handout. The workshop begins with a PowerPoint lecture on basic concepts of health literacy. A lecture with a handout for participants to follow on creating patient handouts is next. Using sample handouts the participants will do several hands-on activities to practice their new skills. We’ll end with a group discussion on health literacy roles that librarians have taken, starting with the instructors’ experience.

Presenter: Nancy Goodwin is the director of the Library & Knowledge Services Department at Middlesex Hospital in Middletown, CT.  She has chaired the Patient Family Education Committee since 2009, working to make the principles of health literacy a part of every patient interaction.

Presenter: Margo Coletti is the director of Knowledge Services, a division of Information Systems at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in
Boston, where she has worked since 1981. Margo teaches clinicians and researchers at BIDMC how to integrate Plain Language principles and practices into the Informed Consent process.

 Sunday October 19, 2014 1:00 to 5:00 pm

Introduction to Genetics Databases (Presenter: David Osterbur, Ph.D.)

This class will complement material learned in the morning class, Concepts in Genetics, by teaching participants about basic genetics databases and how to search them.

 Deciphering Clinical Statistics (Presenter: James McLellan, Ph.D.)

Not so confident about confidence intervals? Not sure what a p value is? Want to know how researchers calculate power? Come learn about these and other statistical topics. Strong math skills not required.

Registration fees for NAHSL 4 hour CE workshops:

·         Member $75.00

·         Non-Member $105.00

$50.00 cancellation fee after 10/10

Questions about continuing education? Contact Jeannine Gluck.

Elegantly Simple Evaluation

Friday, September 19th, 2014

The NER’s Health Literacy COI was featured in the OERC’s blog:

Elegantly Simple Evaluation: Documenting Outcomes of a New England Health Literacy Project

For an example of an elegantly simple program evaluation that yielded great results, check out an article by Michelle Eberle and colleagues in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine New England Region, which appeared in the August 2014 edition of MLA News . The article describes the region’s Clear: Conversationsproject, a collaboration among five organizations in which librarians and health professionals taught health literacy skills to patients. This innovative project, originated by Health Care Missouri, featured role-plays of patients in which they practice good patient communication skills during a visit to a health care provider (played by volunteers from various health professions).

This project shows that a few relatively simple evaluation activities can clearly show the positive outcomes of a project. For example, after their role-play, participants gave high ratings to their satisfaction with the information they received during their “doctor visit.”   When completing the multi-session program, a strong majority said the program improved their comfort with employing effective communication techniques with their own health care providers. More than half of respondents completing the second questionnaire described specific actions they intended to use in future visits to health care providers. Also, the health professional role-players provided their own feedback about how their experiences would affect their own interactions with patients.

The evaluation methods used for the Clear: Conversations project were fairly simple, but well-planned. Eberle and her colleagues developed their evaluation methods in the project planning stage and consulted with the NN/LM OERC on method design. As a result, the team was able to collect information that clearly demonstrated, both to themselves and others, the value of their project.

The OERC would like to highlight more examples of evaluations that are both effective and relatively easy to implement.  If you know of other projects that we can showcase in our Elegantly Simple Evaluation series, please contact Cindy Olney at olneyc@uw.edu.

New Knowledge Path from MCH Library

Monday, September 15th, 2014

[Shared on behalf of Susan Brune Lorenzo, MLS @ MCH Library at Georgetown University]

Health and Wellness for Adolescent Girls and Women with Mental and Behavioral Health Conditions Knowledge Path

The Women’s Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) Project at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Maternal and Child Health Library (MCH Library) at Georgetown University, both of whom are funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB), released a new knowledge path, Health and Wellness for Adolescent Girls and Women with Mental and Behavioral Health Conditions.  The knowledge path aims to bridge the public health and mental health information needs of professionals on approaches to promoting optimal health and wellness for women of childbearing age who experience a mental, emotional, or behavioral health condition. The knowledge path covers topics relevant to health promotion and disease prevention for all women, and specifically for women with mental and behavioral health disorders. Topics include: reproductive and maternal health, intentional injury, chronic conditions, healthy behaviors, and health disparities. Contents include websites, distance!

learning tools, reports, data and statistics, journal articles and other literature and research, and guides on related topics. The knowledge path is available at http://www.mchlibrary.org/KnowledgePaths/kp_WISH.html

A separate brief presents resources for women and their families. The brief is available at http://www.mchlibrary.org/families/frb_WISH.html

We welcome your comments and would appreciate your help in sharing this information with your colleagues via your website, social media, or e-news services.

 

Please visit WP-Admin > Options > Snap Shots and enter the Snap Shots key. How to find your key