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Archive for the ‘Health IT’ Category

Improving the Health Experience

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

The HxRefactored Conference brings together designers, health care providers, public health professionals, and others interested in the intersection of design and technology for a cross-disciplinary exploration of ways to improve the health experience. On April 1st and 2nd, I attended the conference in Boston, Massachusetts sponsored by MadPow and Health 2.0

The conference was jam-packed with inspiring presentations on topics including human centered design/usability, technology, health literacy/equity, mindfulness/stress reduction, behavior change, patient activism, electronic health records and organizational design.  Presenters shared ways to use design and technology to improve the health experience.  I hope you find these summaries of keynote presentations food for thought on creative ways to improve the health experience.

Keynotes ~ April 1, 2015

John Brownstein, Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School and the Computational Epidemiology Group at Children’s Hospital, explored the intersection of data and design for disease prevention in his keynote.  He asked, “How do we make everyone a stakeholder in public health?”  He shared real time detection of public health issues through social media platforms like HealthMap; StreetRx; and MEDWATCHER.  He also discussed new technology like iThermometer, a wearable thermometer that alerts parents of their child’s fever on their smartphone.   His presentation made me think about ways librarians can get involved with the development of social media platforms and new technologies to support public health.

Darshan Mehta, from MGH’s Benson-Henry Institute for Mind and Body Medicine, discussed how to build resiliency with an introduction to the relaxation response.  I’ve been practicing meditation since high school.  I enjoyed his guided relaxation.  It was a nice way to start the first day of the conference.  Mehta spoke about how meditation increases the cortical thickness and can change gene expression.  According to Mehta, mind/body practices reduce the frequency of medical symptoms, decrease the severity of psychiatric symptoms, and increase healthy lifestyles.  This presentation may inspire me to initiate a weekly mindfulness meditation group here at UMassMed School.

Keynotes ~ April 2, 2015

Steve Krug, author of Don’t Make Me Think and Rocket Surgery Made Easy, kicked off day two of the conference.  He only had twenty minutes but led a DIY (do-it-yourself) usability testing example with a volunteer from the audience.  His recommended DIY testing, preferably once a month on the same day – and stick to it!  Also, make it a spectator sport and have as many people as possible come watch.  Then, more people on your staff gain skill in usability testing.  For more information, check out his site, Advanced Common Sense

 Deborah Estrin, Professor of Computer Science  from Cornell NYC Tech, presented on small data.  She talked about using mHealth and small health to create data driven feedback loops of health.  She urged us to invest in interoperable and iterative approaches to benefit from reuse of tools and techniques.  She asked us: “How can we help create resources to help patients answer the question: are you feeling better?”  For examples of such resources, she mentioned Paragon Measure (turning mobile device use into actionable insights) and Ginger.io (using smartphones to improve mental health care).  She wrapped up by urging attendees to create an ecosystem around small data.

John Halamka, Chief Information Officer at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Chairman of the New England Healthcare Exchange Network, spoke about what’s new in HealthIT in 2015.  I’m sure many of you remember his excellent presentation at the NAHSL Annual Conference.  He discussed the federal interoperability roadmap, meaningful use stage 3, new mobile devices, private security challenges and the return to private sector innovation.  I was pleased to hear him mention National Library of Medicine’s free access to vocabulary standards for interoperability.  I was tweeting during the conference and my tweet with the link to NLM’s free APIs (application programming interfaces) was my most retweeted and favorited tweet of the conference.  Interested to learn more?  Check out how the NLM APIs can be used to support electronic health record certification and meaningful use.

Geoff Williams, of the University of Rochester Healthy Living Center Motivation Research Group, spoke about self-determination theory and how people change. He asked,”Does it come from the inside or outside?”  He told us about the psychological needs to support optimal health such as autonomy, competence, and feeling connected to others.

Jared Spool, author of Web Anatomy and Web Site Usability, declared design, “the rendering of intent.”  He asked: “What is the experience we want them to have?  Are we designing activities or experiences?”  He discussed a design process for the design experience and the importance of facilitated leadership.   According to Spool, “The best design teams worship inclusiveness.”

Julian Treasure, Master of Sound and author of Sound Business, was one of my favorite HxR presenters.  He told us the noise is the number one complaint in the hospital experience, the number one problem with productivity in the workplace, and that elevated noise leads to worse health.  He recommended improving acoustics, reducing noises, and designing soundscapes. He shared acronyms to help us learn to listen better and speak powerfully.  He wrapped up with a vocal toolbox activity.  If you are curious to learn more, listen to his TedTalk.

The HxR conference was full of creative and practical ways to improve the health experience. I left inspired to bring what I learned back to our network.  I learned about some amazing presenters that we might be able to host for regional conferences and webinars. I found it an insightful, useful conference and highly recommend it.  Stay tuned for my next blog post about what I learned at the breakout sessions.

Thanks MadPow and Health2.0 for a great conference!

 

 

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Tuesday, March 31st, 2015

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Breaking an EHR system: a sandbox workshop

Monday, January 26th, 2015

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, New England Region is offering this free workshop to its members.

Date: April 24, 2015

Place: Lamar Soutter Library, UMass Medical School

Time: 10AM-2PM

Instructor: PJ Grier, Outreach/Access Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region

Register at http://tinyurl.com/p3nxmq9

Class Description:

The overall objective is to give librarians an opportunity to “touch and feel” the functionality of a certified electronic health record system (EHR-S) in a “safe harbor” demonstration environment. Because many health sciences librarians are currently excluded from accessing their institutional electronic health record system (EHR-S) on an operational, day-to-day basis, this class provides that opportunity, albeit in a “practice” environment.

EHRs are crucial building blocks in the formation of an encrypted national health information network. This is a key reason why health sciences librarians continue to be engaged in important EHR supporting roles within their respective institutions with regard to planning, deployment and even optimization efforts. Now is the time to start evaluating and identifying strategies of how health sciences librarians can best contribute to the value of an EHR from a daily operations, patient care perspective.

This course will access an EHR-S via actual use in a demo environment. Through guided instruction, lecture and videos, students will create practice authentication that will enable them to access and experiment with the functionality of a certified EHR-S. Practice system exercises include dashboard components such as charting, custom texts, adding/registering a new patient, alerts/warnings, medication reconciliation, patient scheduling, meaningful use and billing. From a clinical encounter perspective, there will be sufficient “sandbox” time to enter appropriate ICD-9 diagnosis codes and/or diagnosed health conditions, treatment plans and patient education information (via NLM’s MedlinePlus Connect query process), into the clinical narrative (SOAP Note) of a fictitious patient, as a “physician user”.

Webinar: HealthIT: Health Information Exchanges & Blue Button Initiative

Monday, January 26th, 2015

Wednesday, February 18, 1:30-2:30 pm EST

Health IT for Medical Librarians: Health Information Exchanges & Blue Buttons

Register for free at http://tinyurl.com/p3nxmq9

 

Intro:

Electronic Health Records are only one part of the complex Health IT picture. A larger issue is getting separate EHR systems to work together to connect disparate health information. In this webinar we will hear from two speakers who are involved in this challenge from different perspectives. Dr. Minakshi Tikoo from UCONN Health will be talking about the challenges of health information exchange in the state of Connecticut and some possible solutions. Simone Myrie from the federal Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT will be talking about an initiative designed to help patients manage their own health information.

 

Presenters:

Minakshi Tikoo –

“Reality of health information Exchanges  and Interoperability – a Case study of Connecticut”

This talk will cover the following 1) a broad over view of HITECH Act, comprised of grants from CMS and ONC. 2) A summary of challenges with HIT (covering both HIE and adoption of EHRs) 3) A little dose of reality from the perspective of what it takes to implement and what the challenges are. Lastly, covering what might be some policy and or payment reform that might help.

Simone Myrie –

“Patient Empowerment via eHealth & the Blue Button Initiative” 

Summary of presentation: As policy changes continues to move our health care systems towards being digital, this presents exciting and new opportunities for providers to engage with their patients or their caregivers in a rich way. Find out how the Blue Button Initiative led by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT, HHS and private sector supporters are increasing consumer access to their health information. Consumer ehealth is changing the way patients are able to manage their health and communicate and collaborate with their care teams. All however have a role in educating consumers about their right to access their information, how and the value it presents.

 

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