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Archive for the ‘Announcements’ Category

NIH Funding Opportunity (NIMH)

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

 NIMH Research Education Mentoring Program for HIV/AIDS Researchers (R25)

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH. The over-arching goal of this NIMH R25 program is to support educational activities that complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation’s biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs and advance the priorities outlined in the Office of AIDS Research (OAR) Annual Strategic Plan and the research program priorities of the NIMH Division of AIDS Research (DAR).

To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on Mentoring Activities and Research Experiences, that either capitalize on existing networks of collaborating investigators or develop institute-based research education programs. Mentoring activities are expected to be primary and the cornerstone of proposed programs though all programs must also provide research experiences. Research Education Programs are expected to enhance the professional development of the participants and foster a career trajectory towards independent research in the mental health of HIV/AIDS.

Open Date (Earliest Submission Date): August 7, 2015

Letter of Intent Due Date: 30 days prior to application due date

AIDS Application Due Date: September 7, 2015

Learn more here: PAR-15-145

For more information about HIV/AIDS resources, visit the National Library of Medicine Specialized Information Services HIV/AIDS Information page.

SIS coordinates many of NLM’s HIV/AIDS information activities and its web site provides access to a comprehensive list of resources within and outside of NLM. SIS collaborates with other agencies to produce AIDSinfo, the primary Department of Health and Human Services web site for federally approved treatment guidelines, clinical trials, drug, and vaccine information.

Michael Honch
Outreach Intern
Specialized Information Services Division
National Library of Medicine
National Institutes of Health
Desk: 301.443-7635
michael.honch@nih.gov

NIH Funding Opportunity (Native Americans)

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

Interventions for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in Native American Populations (R01)

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to develop, adapt, and test the effectiveness of health promotion and disease prevention interventions in Native American (NA) populations. NA populations are exposed to considerable risk factors that significantly increase their likelihood of chronic disease, substance abuse, mental illness, oral diseases, and HIV-infection. The intervention program should be culturally appropriate and promote the adoption of healthy lifestyles, improve behaviors and social conditions and/or improve environmental conditions related to chronic diseases, the consumption of tobacco, alcohol and other drugs, mental illness, oral disease, or HIV-infection. The intervention program should be designed so that it could be sustained within the entire community within existing resources, and, if successful, disseminated in other Native American communities. The long-term goal of this FOA is to reduce mortality and morbidity in NA communities. For the purposes of this FOA Native Americans include the following populations: Alaska Native, American Indian, and Native Hawaiian. The term ‘Native Hawaiian’ means any individual any of whose ancestors were natives, prior to 1778, of the area which now comprises the State of Hawaii.

Letter of Intent Due Date: 30 days before the application due date
Application Due Date: May 12, 2015
Learn more here: PAR-14-260
For more information on American Indian health, visit the Specialized Information Services American Indian Health page. Sponsored by the National Library of Medicine, this web site brings together health and medical resources pertinent to the American Indian population including policies, consumer health information, and research. It includes links to evaluated health information from an assortment of resources, web sites, and databases.

Michael Honch
Outreach Intern
Specialized Information Services Division
National Library of Medicine
National Institutes of Health
Desk: 301.443-7635
michael.honch@nih.gov

Improving the Health Experience

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

The HxRefactored Conference brings together designers, health care providers, public health professionals, and others interested in the intersection of design and technology for a cross-disciplinary exploration of ways to improve the health experience. On April 1st and 2nd, I attended the conference in Boston, Massachusetts sponsored by MadPow and Health 2.0

The conference was jam-packed with inspiring presentations on topics including human centered design/usability, technology, health literacy/equity, mindfulness/stress reduction, behavior change, patient activism, electronic health records and organizational design.  Presenters shared ways to use design and technology to improve the health experience.  I hope you find these summaries of keynote presentations food for thought on creative ways to improve the health experience.

Keynotes ~ April 1, 2015

John Brownstein, Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School and the Computational Epidemiology Group at Children’s Hospital, explored the intersection of data and design for disease prevention in his keynote.  He asked, “How do we make everyone a stakeholder in public health?”  He shared real time detection of public health issues through social media platforms like HealthMap; StreetRx; and MEDWATCHER.  He also discussed new technology like iThermometer, a wearable thermometer that alerts parents of their child’s fever on their smartphone.   His presentation made me think about ways librarians can get involved with the development of social media platforms and new technologies to support public health.

Darshan Mehta, from MGH’s Benson-Henry Institute for Mind and Body Medicine, discussed how to build resiliency with an introduction to the relaxation response.  I’ve been practicing meditation since high school.  I enjoyed his guided relaxation.  It was a nice way to start the first day of the conference.  Mehta spoke about how meditation increases the cortical thickness and can change gene expression.  According to Mehta, mind/body practices reduce the frequency of medical symptoms, decrease the severity of psychiatric symptoms, and increase healthy lifestyles.  This presentation may inspire me to initiate a weekly mindfulness meditation group here at UMassMed School.

Keynotes ~ April 2, 2015

Steve Krug, author of Don’t Make Me Think and Rocket Surgery Made Easy, kicked off day two of the conference.  He only had twenty minutes but led a DIY (do-it-yourself) usability testing example with a volunteer from the audience.  His recommended DIY testing, preferably once a month on the same day – and stick to it!  Also, make it a spectator sport and have as many people as possible come watch.  Then, more people on your staff gain skill in usability testing.  For more information, check out his site, Advanced Common Sense

 Deborah Estrin, Professor of Computer Science  from Cornell NYC Tech, presented on small data.  She talked about using mHealth and small health to create data driven feedback loops of health.  She urged us to invest in interoperable and iterative approaches to benefit from reuse of tools and techniques.  She asked us: “How can we help create resources to help patients answer the question: are you feeling better?”  For examples of such resources, she mentioned Paragon Measure (turning mobile device use into actionable insights) and Ginger.io (using smartphones to improve mental health care).  She wrapped up by urging attendees to create an ecosystem around small data.

John Halamka, Chief Information Officer at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Chairman of the New England Healthcare Exchange Network, spoke about what’s new in HealthIT in 2015.  I’m sure many of you remember his excellent presentation at the NAHSL Annual Conference.  He discussed the federal interoperability roadmap, meaningful use stage 3, new mobile devices, private security challenges and the return to private sector innovation.  I was pleased to hear him mention National Library of Medicine’s free access to vocabulary standards for interoperability.  I was tweeting during the conference and my tweet with the link to NLM’s free APIs (application programming interfaces) was my most retweeted and favorited tweet of the conference.  Interested to learn more?  Check out how the NLM APIs can be used to support electronic health record certification and meaningful use.

Geoff Williams, of the University of Rochester Healthy Living Center Motivation Research Group, spoke about self-determination theory and how people change. He asked,”Does it come from the inside or outside?”  He told us about the psychological needs to support optimal health such as autonomy, competence, and feeling connected to others.

Jared Spool, author of Web Anatomy and Web Site Usability, declared design, “the rendering of intent.”  He asked: “What is the experience we want them to have?  Are we designing activities or experiences?”  He discussed a design process for the design experience and the importance of facilitated leadership.   According to Spool, “The best design teams worship inclusiveness.”

Julian Treasure, Master of Sound and author of Sound Business, was one of my favorite HxR presenters.  He told us the noise is the number one complaint in the hospital experience, the number one problem with productivity in the workplace, and that elevated noise leads to worse health.  He recommended improving acoustics, reducing noises, and designing soundscapes. He shared acronyms to help us learn to listen better and speak powerfully.  He wrapped up with a vocal toolbox activity.  If you are curious to learn more, listen to his TedTalk.

The HxR conference was full of creative and practical ways to improve the health experience. I left inspired to bring what I learned back to our network.  I learned about some amazing presenters that we might be able to host for regional conferences and webinars. I found it an insightful, useful conference and highly recommend it.  Stay tuned for my next blog post about what I learned at the breakout sessions.

Thanks MadPow and Health2.0 for a great conference!

 

 

NLM Funding Opportunity

Monday, April 6th, 2015

Regional Medical Libraries Cooperative Agreements for 2016-2021

The National Library of Medicine has announced that the Regional Medical Libraries (RML) and supporting offices cooperative agreement funding opportunities for 2016-2021 are open for applications until July 24, 2015.

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites cooperative agreement (UG4) applications for Regional Medical Libraries (RMLs) as an integral component of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM). The goal of the NN/LM is to advance the progress of medicine and improve public health by providing U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information and improving individual’s access to information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health. Eight Health Sciences Libraries will function as the RML for their respective region. The RMLs will coordinate the operation of a Network of Libraries and other organizations to carry out regional and national programs. The RMLs will ensure a continuity of quality service for core programs of the NN/LM, and cooperatively design, implement and evaluate innovative approaches to serve the health information needs of health professionals and the public in the future.

Open Date (Earliest Submission Date)/Letter of Intent Due Date: June 24, 2015
Application Due Date: July 24, 2015
Read more here: RFA-LM-15-003

Technical Assistance Webinar (this will be recorded for future viewing)
When: Thursday April 23, 2015, from 3:00-4:00pm ET
Where: Webinar URL - https://webmeeting.nih.gov/nlm_rml_423/
Teleconference number: 1-866-579-8110 Participant Code: 571542
We encourage you to submit questions in advance by email to: NLMRMLQuestions@mail.nih.gov

The Outreach and Special Populations Branch (OSPB) manages and develops programs to eliminate disparities in health information access by providing community outreach support, training health professionals on NLM’s health information databases, and designing websites that discuss the concerns of various racial and ethnic groups. These programs reach health professionals, public health workers and the general public, especially about health issues that disproportionately impact minorities such as environmental exposures and HIV/AIDS.

Michael Honch
Outreach Intern
Specialized Information Services Division
National Library of Medicine
National Institutes of Health
Desk: 301.443-7635
michael.honch@nih.gov

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