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The aftermath: coping with disasters

A common thread in many disaster incidents is the immediate and long-term impact on the emotional well-being of survivors and disaster responders. From a mental health perspective there are many potential responses, including PTSD. Children, teens and adults may have very different reactions to trauma and express their reactions in different ways.

Anniversaries of events such as the West, TX explosion, Boston Marathon bombing and the May 2013 tornadoes are often accompanied by extensive media coverage and can re-trigger strong reactions. Individual grief and loss can linger for years at the same time communities may be celebrating their resilience and ability to commemorate and re-build.

This email is a reminder that NLM and others collect or provide many resources for information on disaster-related mental health issues. Of course, online health information is only one small piece of the range of services that must also include local, in-person medical care, counseling, support groups, comfort and security, and strategies for recovery.

For those who are suffering whether from recent events, last year or from long ago, our thoughts are with you.

–DIMRC staff

Disaster Distress Helpline

From the National Library of Medicine:

Topics from MedlinePlus (National Library of Medicine) for the general public:

MedlinePlus en español

Disaster Apps and Mobile Optimized Web Pages: Psychological Health Tools
http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/disasterapps.html#a1

Submitted by Cindy Love
Disaster Information Management Research Center
Specialized Information Services Division
National Library of Medicine
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD 20892-5467
cindy_love@nlm.nih.gov

http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov

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