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Webinar Recording: Adding Value to EHR’s: Librarians Step Up

The recording of the webinar hosted on November 12, 2014 is available at http://nnlm.gov/ner/training/distancelearning.html

Speakers:
Mina Davenport, MLS, CT; USCF Benioff Children’s Hospital, Oakland, CA Dina McKelvy, MLA, AHIP, Library Manager for Automation & Planning, Main Medical Center Library, Portland, ME

Webinar Recording: Partnering at the Point of Care

A recording of the webinar hosted on October 7, 2014 is available at http://nnlm.gov/ner/training/distancelearning.html.

Speaker:
Amy Knehans, MLA, AHIP, Clinical Outreach & Instruction Librarian, Hershey Medical Center, Penn State College of Medicine

Collaborations can advance nursing care and improve patient outcomes. Nurses need easy access to specific resources to practice evidence based care and they require effective skills to use them. Librarians provide the evidence-based resources and support training. This session will describe a successful partnership in introducing and promoting the Nursing Reference Center (NRC) at the Point of Care throughout the Department of Nursing via the shared governance Council structure. Participants will be encouraged to share how they are collaborating with nurses at their institutions to support evidence based practice and nursing research activities.

Public Libraries and Improved Health

[Guest post from Deb Clark, Maine State Library]

Check out this radio show interview with Portland Public Library director, Steve Podgajny and Dr. Sam Zager formerly at Maine Medical Center which discusses the findings of the recent HeLPURS study showing a correlation between public library use and improvement in individual health. The HeLPURS radio interview (show #166)  will be streaming on the website at  http://themainemag.com/radio/

This important study demonstrates the value of public libraries in supporting healthy behavior change. It provides an opportunity for our libraries to show their worth to their communities as places which can assist users in their efforts to live healthier lifestyles, another way libraries strengthen their communities. Please take a few moments to listen to the program and think about how your library can provide health information and programming that promotes informed health decision-making and positive health behaviors. Here’s a summary of the study below. The results of the study are currently being prepared for publication.

Pioneering Research by Maine Physician Proves Link Between Public Library Use And Tobacco Cessation In Study Done In Collaboration With Portland Public Library

In 2010, a highly regarded group of physicians, brain scientists, social scientists, and other experts went on record with their expert opinion that public libraries likely promote health. One Maine physician has just completed the first-ever direct and broad research on the topic – and proved their instincts were on the right track.

Maine physician Dr. Sam Zager was the driving force behind the Health and Libraries of Public Use Retrospective Study (HeLPURS), the first broad investigation of health and public libraries. The study investigated whether a link between library use and health could be quantifiably established. Dr. Zager’s interest in the intersection of health and public library use grew out of his involvement in library advocacy efforts in Boston several years ago. He noticed that the prior research into health and libraries was sparse and narrowly focused on health literacy. No studies existed to determine the relationship between library use and individuals’ health profiles.

HeLPURS research was made possible through a collaboration with Portland Public Library, spearheaded by PPL’s Health and Institutional Research Teams and funded by a generous grant from the Anne Randolph Henry Charitable Foundation. Study participants were recruited from among a large pool of adult Maine Medical Center Family Medicine patients. Participants who were also PPL card holders granted permission for the Library to release information on frequency of their library use for correlation by Dr. Zager and his colleagues with their medical histories. Throughout the study, all privacy laws and human research ethics protocols as well as PPL privacy policies were strictly observed, and no personal borrowing history was ever queried.

The project results provide evidence that public library use has quantifiable associations with health, particularly in the areas of substance abuse and depression-anxiety disorders. The most dramatic finding is that moderate or higher use of public libraries is associated with tobacco cessation. Individuals who have ever been smokers and who used the library at least moderately – seven or more items checked out per active year – were nearly three times more likely to have successfully quit smoking, compared with smokers who used the library less.

“HeLPURS offers the first direct evidence that public libraries could be health-promoting spaces,” Zager says, “This was out-of-the-box thinking, but now these results beg for further research. The current findings also have important implications when estimating return on investment in public libraries in Maine and across the country.”

Zager’s sentiments are echoed by PPL Executive Director Steve Podgajny. “What the HeLPURS study does,” Podgajny observes, “is to clinically isolate a specific and very important health relationship that public libraries have with individuals and the community as a whole. The study has many ramifications one of which is how public libraries might serve more effectively as a vehicle for public health funding and goals.”

About Dr. Zager

Dr. Sam Zager is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, who holds an MD from Harvard University and an M.Phil. in Economic and Social History from Oxford University. His presentation on HeLPURS won top prize at the Maine Academy of Family Physicians Annual Conference last month. Dr. Zager has been a Family Medicine Resident Physician at Maine Medical Center since 2011, and he will begin practicing Family Medicine with Martin’s Point Healthcare starting in September 2014.

Post Contributed by:

Deborah A. Clark, Consultant

Southern Maine Library District

Portland Public Library

E-mail: deborah.clark@maine.gov

 

Literature Search Strategy Week at AEA

We at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) have previously covered the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) tip-a-day blog at http://aea365.org/blog as a helpful resource. This week posts about literature search strategies were shared on the AEA blog by Network member librarians from the Lamar Soutter Library at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Have you been involved in a similar collaboration? Please let us know, we’d love to feature your work in a future OERC blog post!

Literature Search Strategy Week

  1. Best Databases – learn the most effective starting points for biomedical, interdisciplinary, specialized, and a handy Top Ten list of literature databases.
  2. Constructing a Literature Search – learn the value of a vocabulary roadmap, and the difference between keyword and controlled vocabulary searching.
  3. Grey Literature – strategies for understanding these non-traditional but highly valuable information resources and starting points on where to find them.
  4. Using MyNCBI – learn how to sign up for your free account, save your PubMed search strategies, receive email updates, customize your display and more.
  5. Citation Management – featuring both freely available and other options you may have access to through your academic organizations.
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