Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About NER | Contact NER | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

DOCLINE will no longer support Internet Explorer 8 or Internet Explorer 9

We are announcing that As of October 1, 2015 DOCLINE will no longer support Internet Explorer 8 or Internet Explorer 9.

DOCLINE may continue to work with these browsers beyond that date, however new versions of DOCLINE and Loansome Doc will not be tested with Internet Explorer 8/9, nor will we fix any future issues that are identified as being present only in IE8/9.

 

Microsoft is ending support for Internet Explorer versions 8, 9, 10 as of January 2016.  See http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ie/archive/2014/08/07/stay-up-to-date-with-internet-explorer.aspx

NLM DOCLINE Team

Disaster Preparedness Resources: September is National Preparedness Month

September is National Preparedness Month (NPM) and the theme for this year is Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.  Communication is an important part of the emergency plan whether it is preparing an emergency kit, an evacuation plan, or what to do in case of separation.

forest-fire-465617_640 Libraries have played an important part in disaster recovery, often being a place of refuge in the aftermath. But libraries can assist before the disaster by providing information and programs to inform their communities to better prepare for such emergencies by keeping them aware of the resources available and providing opportunities to create disaster plans which can lead to a smoother recovery and may lessen the losses during a disaster whether natural or human created. Such steps don’t necessarily eliminate the stress and anxiety associated with such events but it can help reduce it as well as reduce the impact.

The National Library of Medicine provides a wealth of resources in disaster planning for libraries.  MedlinePlus contains information for all sorts of disasters and an array of information for the public. DIMRC (Disaster Information Management Resource Center) contains information to prepare libraries to become educated and informed about their role in the community to better assist their communities when disasters strike. This informative website provides access to information resources specifically for disasters including focusing on preparedness, response and recovery. It includes such information as training and competencies in disaster preparedness, resources for first responders and patrons and clinicians, and in large-scale disasters free access to the medical literature. DIMRC has an upcoming webinar titled Disaster Health Information Outreach & Collaboration Project scheduled for September 10 at 1:30am EST.  To listen to this and previous webinars go to http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/dismeetings.html

Ready.gov provides all kinds disaster preparation information including a link to FEMA’s facilitator guide for libraries and others who may want to provide a community program focused on emergency preparedness. There’s information for businesses and the community including fun learning tools for kids. Each week of National Preparedness Month focuses on a particular disaster leading up to its conclusion on September 30 which is the National PrepareAthon Day. Join this grassroots campaign to increase awareness of emergency preparedness.

Contact us here at the NER if you have questions about these and other resources for your library’s role in emergency preparedness.

RML-NLM-MLA 2015 Update

Date: Friday September 25, 2015

Time: 1pm-2:15pm

Come and hear the annual RML-NLM-MLA update.  Back by popular demand! Rather than using NAHSL conference time for this update we will continue to use the online format .

This update will occur before the conference so more members can participate and have a chance to ask questions in real time.  We also hope this update will generate conversation at the conference.  Both our MLA president and Executive Director along with the RML staff will be exhibiting at NAHSL so come by and say hello!

It’s Summertime . . . and the Reading is Easy

[Guest post by Cara Marcus, MSLIS, AHIP, Director of Library Services, Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital]

During the splendid days of summer, our thoughts shift to vacations, relaxing at the beach or by the pool, sipping lemonade on a chair on the porch as a gentle breeze passes by, and an enthralling book to read and lose oneself in.  So where do you find a great summer reading book?  At your local health sciences library, of course!

At Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital, our Medical Library and Patient/Family Resource Center regularly host BookTalks throughout the year.  They are open to all staff, volunteers, patients, family members, and the community.  During the summer, BookTalks include topics that invite reflection and relaxation, such as Learning to Dance with the Dragonfly: Healing Lessons of Nature, Hope in the Midst: 30 Devotions of Comfort and Inspiration, and 100 Quotations to Make You Think.  These talks are only a half-hour in length, suitable for staff to come during their lunch or break, and for patients before or after an appointment.  I introduce the books, and participants take turns reading passages and often view beautiful illustrations or photos.  The talks lead to spirited interactions and discussions, and yes, many people want to read the books.

Since 2014, I have facilitated a summertime community read for BWFH’s Cultural Competence Steering Committee entitled “One Book: One Hospital”.  Each year, the committee selects a book focusing on a different culture – last year’s choice was My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor, and this year’s selection is Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe.  The program includes in-person and social media book discussion sessions, open house tables with raffles to win the book, table tent signs in the cafeteria with book discussion questions to get people reading and talking about the book, and immersion into the book’s culture with food, music, art, and more.  This year’s program has been so successful that the book has been checked out over two dozen times, and even with twelve books in the collection, there has been a waiting list all summer.

We also hold periodic special BookTalks when a member of the hospital staff publishes a book of interest to the general public.  These wonderful programs are of great interest to the whole community.  We’ve held talks on The Origin of the Human Mind, If You Felt Like I Did, You’d Start Running, and The Migraine Solution: A Complete Guide to Diagnosis, Treatment, and Pain Management.  The authors themselves lead these special BookTalks, with the added bonus of having an expert Q&A session included in the program.  We’re ending this summer with a very special program by a BWFH surgeon – Dr. Onali Kapasi, who will be reading from his book of poetry, Mind’s Eye: A Vision into the Depths of Consciousness.  Of course, NER’Eastah readers are invited – the poetry reading will be held on September 21, 2015 at 7 pm in Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital’s Huvos Auditorium (directions).  Hope to see you there!

If you want to get started hosting similar programs in your library, here are some tips:

  • Visit some BookTalks and book discussion groups in your area. Your local public library probably has some that you can participate in.
  • Learn about how to start your own group, develop questions, and promote the program. The American Library Association has some excellent resources.
  • Comb your collection for fascinating and unique titles. Don’t forget your e-books – we’ve had some great BookTalks with e-books by passing around the library Nook.  Make sure that you enjoy the book you are presenting!
  • You don’t even have to own the book in your library to host a program – you can ask participants to purchase a copy or borrow a copy from their local library.
  • Find departments or groups in your organization to champion the program. You may even be invited to present a book at a staff meeting and have a ready-made audience.  Public Affairs and Marketing departments always have great ideas and can help you spread the word about your program.
  • Practice with your staff or volunteers (or even your own family or friends) before going live with your book discussion group.
  • At the end of each session, ask participants what other books they’d like to read – it’s never too early to start planning for next summer.

Happy reading!

By Cara Marcus, MSLIS, AHIP
Director of Library Services, Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital

Please visit WP-Admin > Options > Snap Shots and enter the Snap Shots key. How to find your key