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Ring in 2015 with 8 MLA CEs, a Project Plan, and MAR Funding to Make it Happen!

MAR invites applications for our next round of funding opportunities which are due March 13, 2015.  Funding is designed to support our network members, as well as to encourage outreach activities aligned with the NN/LM mission to provide all U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information, and improve the public’s access to information so they can make informed decisions about their health.

Libraries, information centers, health centers, community- and faith-based organizations, and others providing health information services are encouraged to apply for a variety of awards that:

  • improve health information services
  • increase awareness and access to biomedical information
  • educate and empower consumers to make informed decisions about their health
  • prepare librarians and staff to meet the needs and challenges of the changing healthcare environment

To coincide with this new round of funding, MAR has teamed up with Outreach and Evaluation expert, Cindy Olney, from the NN/LM Outreach and Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) to offer a 4-part webinar series, eligible for up to 8 MLA CEs.

Mapping an Outreach Project:  Start with Information; End with a Plan is designed for anyone who wants to garner support, financial or otherwise, for a new project or service.  You will learn how assessment and evaluation can be effective tools for project planning and proposal writing.  Assessment enables you to gather compelling information about the need and viability of your project.  It also helps you build relationships with potential partners.  Adding evaluation methods to your program plan helps you “begin with the end in mind,” making desired results the centerpiece of your project proposal.  This class will elaborate on information contained in the OERC Planning and Evaluation booklets.

  • Webinar 1:  January 12:  Noon-1:00 pm

Know the factors that influence people to adopt new ideas and technology so you can choose the best strategies for your project

  • Webinar 2:  January 14:  Noon-1:00 pm

Gather information about your target audience that is most effective for planning your project

  • Webinar 3:  January 26:  Noon-1:00 pm

Use a project-planning tool that allows you to logically link resources and activities to desired results

  • Webinar 4:  January 28:  Noon-1:00 pm

Incorporate evaluation into your project and understand how your plan can be expanded into a full project proposal

These classes will be followed by a special 2-hour Grants and Proposal Writing course, offered online February 2nd / 10 am – Noon.

These classes will focus special attention on applications for MAR funding.  However, information presented is relevant to many types of outreach and project proposals.

The Perils & Promises of Genomic Medicine (Boost Box session)

Presenter:           Carrie Iwema, Information Specialist in Molecular Biology, Molecular Biology Information Service / Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh

Date / Time:       Tuesday, January 13, 2015 / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Where:                https://webmeeting.nih.gov/boost2/

Online / No Registration Required / 1 MLA CE will be awarded

Description: Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have greatly reduced the cost of whole genome sequencing and created fascinating new areas of study—personal genomics and personalized medicine. Empowered by recent technological advancements, scientists now have the ability to rapidly compare genetic alphabets of groups of people who show a particular trait with those that do not.  Access to your personal genome enables you to identify genetic risk factors or inheritable disease markers you are carrying and can help you and your doctor choose the appropriate medications, dosages, and healthcare strategies.  It is more critical than ever to have a basic understanding of the science behind these advances, as well as the associated ethical, legal, and social issues, in order to actively participate in this exciting and rapidly changing field.

2015 MeSH Now Available in PubMed

As of December 15, PubMed/MEDLINE citations (including the backlog of citations indexed since November 19 with 2015 MeSH), the MeSH database, and the NLM Catalog were updated to reflect 2015 MeSH. The MeSH translation tables were also updated on December 15. Now that end-of-year activities are complete, PubMed/MEDLINE may be searched using 2015 MeSH vocabulary. On December 16, NLM resumed daily MEDLINE updates to PubMed.

Closing During the Holidays?

The holiday season is upon us, so we’d like to remind users that you can help keep requests moving efficiently through DOCLINE by completing the “Out of Office” form which will prevent requests from routing to your library during a closure.

You can set a future ‘Out of Office’ date range and request RML approval at any time by going to the Institutions, Update, Out of Office page.  However, we do suggest you submit your request for deactivation a few days in advance of your departure to ensure time for your RML to review.  Please note only one ‘Out of Office’ date range is permitted at a time; you cannot request a second deactivation period until the present period is past. Detailed instructions for use of this feature can be found at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/services/doc_deactivate.html.

To expedite borrower’s requests through DOCLINE, please process as many requests as possible as ‘Filled’ or ‘Not Filled’ on the last day your library is active.  At the end of the day, please receipt any new requests and process all outstanding requests as ‘Not Filled’ so they will immediately route on to the next potential lender.

If you have questions, you can call your RML at 800-338-7657.  Canadian libraries should call CISTI at 1-800-668-1222.

Best wishes to all for a safe and joyous holiday season.

— The DOCLINE Team

DOCLINE Customer Service
National Library of Medicine
US: 1-888-FINDNLM (press 2)
Intl: 301-594-5983 (press 2)
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/docline

NLM Selected as a Host Site for the 2015 National Digital Stewardship Residency

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is pleased to announce its participation in the second year of the National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR), a significant partnership of the Library of Congress (LC) and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), to build a dedicated community of stewards capable of managing, preserving and making accessible the nation’s digital assets. The NDSR enables recent Master’s program graduates in relevant fields to complete a paid 12-month residency at host institutions in the Washington DC area, where they work on significant digital stewardship projects. Similar NDSR programs are on-going in Boston and New York.

NLM’s NDSR project proposal, to select and preserve an NLM-produced software product, was chosen in a highly competitive process from about 15 other proposals. NLM will join the American Institute of Architects, the DC Public Library, the Government Publishing Office and the U.S. Senate, Historical Office as a host institution beginning in June, 2015. A detailed list of all five projects can be found at the NDSR website. This is the second year that NLM has been chosen as an NDSR host site, evidence of NLM’s commitment and support of digital stewardship.

NDSR is now accepting applications for qualified applicants for places in the five Washington DC host institutions. The residency application period is open from December 17 to January 30. The application instructions and list of requirements can be found on the NDSR website. Candidates may apply online for one of the five residencies.

NLM Resource Update: TOXNET Now Provides Permalinks to Individual Records

TOXNET is a group of databases covering chemicals and drugs, diseases and the environment, environmental health, occupational safety and health, poisoning, risk assessment and regulations, and toxicology http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/. TOXNET includes the Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB) which provides toxicity data for over 5,700 potentially hazardous chemicals. HSDB also has information on emergency handling procedures, industrial hygiene, environmental fate, human exposure, detection methods, and regulatory requirements. HSDB is one of the features of WISER, the Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders http://wiser.nlm.nih.gov/.

Permanent links to National Library of Medicine (NLM) TOXNET records are now provided for HSDB as well as TOXLINE, LactMed, Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Database (DART), Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD), Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER), Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System (CCRIS), and GENE-TOX.

To create a permanent link, click on the “Permalink” button found in the upper right of a TOXNET record. This provides a pop-up window with a URL to share or to save for retrieving the record at a later time.

AHRQ Grantee Simplifies Medicine Instructions

Explicit, standardized instructions that improve patients’ understanding, and possibly reduce errors while improving adherence, are now available from the AHRQ Pharmacy Health Literacy Center. These tested instructions for pills follow the Universal Medication Schedule (UMS), which simplifies complex medicine regimens by using standard time periods for administration (morning, noon, evening, and bedtime). The instructions have also been translated into Chinese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese.

To access the instructions in all six languages, go to: http://www.ahrq.gov/professionals/quality-patient-safety/pharmhealthlit/prescriptionmed-instr.html.

To learn about other tools and resources available from the AHRQ’s Pharmacy Health Literacy Center, go to: http://www.ahrq.gov/professionals/quality-patient-safety/pharmhealthlit/index.html.

DOCLINE Training Coming in January

Save the date: Online DOCLINE Training Series for new DOCLINE users and those who want a refresher.

No registration is required. Class login- information to follow.

Beginning DOCLINE: January 7, 2015 / 1 PM (ET)

This class covers the bare essentials of DOCLINE where participants will have an increased understanding of the basic features of DOCLINE. The instructor will give an overview of the layout of the DOCLINE window and will provide a brief description of some of the most commonly used features and their functions.

DOCLINE Routing Tables: January 14, 2015 / 1 PM (ET)

This class will provide an in-depth look into DOCLINE Routing Tables. Participants will learn about using their Borrowing Preferences, brief explanation of copyright compliance, editing Routing Tables, M/A/N Map, setting up Lending Options, and more!

DOCLINE: Serial Holdings: January 21, 2015 / 1 PM (ET)

This class will provide an in-depth look into DOCLINE’s Serial Holdings. Participants will be provided with an introduction to the Serial Holdings database, how to add, remove, and update Holdings, how to run reports, and where to go to get additional Serial Holdings support.

New to this class using the embargo feature.

DOCLINE Borrowing and Lending: January 28, 2015 / 1 PM (ET)

This class will provide an in-depth look into DOCLINE Borrowing and Lending. Participants will learn about: using their Borrowing Preferences; the many ways to borrow; how to process request received; how to run and view reports; the different levels of requests (normal, rush, and urgent patient care) and more.

NIH Manuscript Submission (NIHMS) System Getting a New Look

In January, 2015, the NIH Manuscript Submission (NIHMS) system will be getting a new interface design, which will streamline the login and manuscript submission processes and provide relevant help information on each screen. The NIHMS sign-in routes will be available from the homepage, with options based on a funding agency or signing in through NCBI. The new homepage will also include a graphic overview of the NIHMS process, allowing you to hover over each step for more information or to click on “Learn More” to read the complete overview in the FAQ. Once you are signed in to NIHMS, you will be directed to your Manuscript List. From this page you can manage and track your existing submissions, submit a new manuscript, and search for a record. You can also click on any headings in the information box to expand a topic and read the help text. The initial deposit will still require you to enter a manuscript and journal title, deposit complete manuscript files, and specify funding information and the embargo.

Key updates will include:

  • Assigning an NIHMSID to a record only after files have been uploaded, i.e., at the Check Files step;
  • A streamlined deposit process with clearly defined and explained actions in each step;
  • Requiring the Submitter to open the PDF Receipt to review the uploaded files and confirm that the submission is complete before advancing to the next step;
  • Relevant help information on each page; and
  • Requiring the Reviewer to add funding before approving the initial deposit.

TFAH Releases Outbreaks: Protecting Americans from Infectious Disease 2014

Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) are pleased to share with you a new report, Outbreaks: Protecting Americans from Infectious Diseases 2014.  The report finds the Ebola outbreak exposes serious underlying gaps in the nation’s ability to manage severe infectious disease threats.

Over the last decade, we have seen dramatic improvements in state and local capacity to respond to outbreaks and emergencies.  But we also saw during the recent Ebola outbreak that some of the most basic infectious disease controls failed when tested. Some key findings from the report include progress and gaps in the areas of:

Preparing for Emerging Threats:  Significant advances have been made in preparing for public health emergencies since the September 11, 2001 and subsequent anthrax attacks, but gaps remain and have been exacerbated as resources have been cut over time.

Vaccinations:  More than 2 million preschoolers, 35 percent of seniors and a majority of adults do not receive all recommended vaccinations.

Healthcare-Associated Infections:  While healthcare-associated infections have declined in recent years due to stronger prevention policies, around one out of every 25 people who are hospitalized each year still contracts a healthcare-associated infection.

Sexually Transmitted Infections and Related Disease Treatment and Prevention:  The number of new HIV infections grew by 22 percent among young gay men, and 48 percent among young Black men (between 2008 and 2010); more than one-third of gonorrhea cases are now antibiotic-resistant; and nearly three million Baby Boomers are infected with hepatitis C, the majority of whom do not know they have it.

Food Safety:  Around 48 million Americans suffer from a foodborne illness each year.

The Outbreaks report recommends that it is time to rethink and modernize the health system to better match existing and emerging global disease threats.  Priority improvements should include:

Core Abilities:  Every state should be able to meet a set of core capabilities and there must be sufficient, sustained funding to support these capabilities. Some basic capabilities include: investigative expertise, including surveillance systems that can identify and track threats and communicate across the health system and strong laboratory capacity; containment strategies, including vaccines and medicines; continued training and testing for hospitals and health departments for infection control and emergency preparedness; risk communications capabilities that inform the public without creating unnecessary fear; and maintaining a strong research capacity to develop new vaccines and medical treatments.

Healthcare and Public Health Integration:  Systems must be improved so the healthcare system, hospitals and public health agencies work better together toward the common goals of protecting patients, healthcare workers and the public; and

Leadership and Accountability:  Stronger leadership is needed for a government-wide approach to health threats at the federal, state and local levels, and there must be increased support for integration and flexibility of programs in exchange for demonstration of capabilities and accountability.

The full report and state-by-state materials are available on TFAH’s website at www.healthyamericans.org and on RWJF’s website at www.rwjf.org. If you have any questions or would like to schedule a briefing on the report, please contact TFAH’s Senior Government Relations Manager, Dara Lieberman, at dlieberman@tfah.org or 202-864-5942.