Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About MAR | Contact MAR | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Job Ad: Biomedical Librarian, Philadelphia, PA

Biomedical Librarian – Temple University – Philadelphia, PA

Job #: TU-18803

Reporting to the Director of Health Sciences Libraries, the Biomedical & Research Services Librarian supports the research, graduate education, and grant activities of the health sciences center at Temple University through education, consultation and expert searching of bibliographic databases and other resources, such as gray literature (trial registries, dissertations, conference abstracts/proceedings). Performs other duties as assigned.

Required Education and Experience:

ALA-accredited Master’s degree in library/information science and at least three years’ experience as a full-time science or health sciences librarian in a higher education (college or university) institution. An equivalent combination of education and experience may be considered.

Required Skills and Abilities:

*Extensive knowledge of health and life sciences databases, such as MEDLINE, Web of Science, Biosis, and Embase.

*Demonstrated expert searcher skills as delineated by the MLA statement on expert searching.

*Familiarity with the research process in the health and life sciences.

*Familiarity with the NIH Public Access Policy.

*Demonstrated initiative and self-direction.

*Experience meeting the information needs of researchers.

*Excellent project management skills.

*Excellent oral and written communication skills.

Preferred:

*Undergraduate or graduate degree in the physical, life, or health sciences, with a demonstrated understanding of the scientific research process.

*Demonstrated experience conducting EBM and systematic review searches.

*Familiarity with best practices for managing research data.

*Experience and willingness to learn new and emerging technologies.

Compliance Statement: In the performance of their functions as detailed in the position description employees have an obligation to avoid ethical, legal, financial and other conflicts of interest to ensure that their actions and outside activities do not conflict with their primary employment responsibilities at the institution. Employees are also expected to understand and be in compliance with applicable laws, University and employment policies and regulations, including NCAA regulations for areas and departments which their essential functions cause them to interact.

To obtain additional information about Temple University please visit our website at www.temple.edu.

Temple University’s Annual Security and Fire Safety Report contains statistics, policies, and procedures related to campus safety and can be found at: http://www.temple.edu/safety/asfr/

You may request a copy of the report by calling Temple University’s Campus Safety Services at 215-204-7900.

APPLY: https://hospats.adminsvc.temple.edu/CSS_External/CSSPage_JobDetail.ASP?T=20150213131146&

Awardee Project Reports (Lunch with the RML session)

ProjectEnhancing Access to Mental Health Information in Northeastern Pennsylvania
Awardee:  Joanne M. Muellenbach / Medical Library, The Commonwealth Medical College, Scranton, PA
Description:  The Commonwealth Medical College (TCMC) will partner with the Lackawanna County Library System (LCLS) in the design and implementation of a Mental Health in NEPA event directed towards librarians and other public services professionals.  Information literacy, train-the-trainer sessions on how to locate high quality, mental health information for librarians and other public services professionals, would be a key part of the Mental Health in NEPA event.  In addition, the TCMC Library would purchase a core collection of carefully-selected mental health titles and make these resources available to members of the Lackawanna County Library System and TCMC affiliates.

ProjectMentoring Health Careers through Health Information Projects for High School and Middle School
Awardees:  Debra Rand and Wendy Herman / The Hofstra North Shore‐LIJ School of Medicine at Hofstra University‐School of Medicine Health Sciences Library, Hempstead, NY
Description:  The Health Sciences Library staff proposes a partnership with students to expand upon current service learning initiatives by targeting the high school and middle school students and staff in a local school district for health literacy and education projects.  Activities will include developing and conducting educational sessions for the Health Related Careers course, providing information about health and science careers, conducting educational health fairs for students and their families, hosting visits to the School of Medicine and North Shore‐LIJ Health System including interaction with students and staff, outreach with school librarians and nurses, development of customized resources (a consumer health information web portal, video tutorials, and print tools) to support all of the activities, and potential use of the web portal, tutorials, and resources for outreach to additional teen and consumer populations in Nassau County.

ProjectSupporting the Information Needs of Clarkson University’s Health Sciences Programs through Improved Technology
Awardee:  Regan DeFranza / Health Sciences Library, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY
Description:  The Health Sciences Library provides orientation programs, instructional classes and reference/research services to the Physical Therapy and Physician Assistants programs.  The primary goal is to enable students to find, use, manage and evaluate medical information for academic success and to build the information skills they will need throughout their careers.  The outdated technology available for reference, research and instruction impedes the present delivery and precludes expansion of these services.  This project will provide eight computers in the library computer lab, allow for the addition of a mobile workstation (laptop computer and projector) for teaching in multiple venues, and add an interactive smartboard which will enhance student engagement.

Date / Time:  February 26th / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Wherehttps://webmeeting.nih.gov/lunch2/

Online / No Registration Required

NLM to Host A Tribute to Marshall Nirenberg

Fifty years ago, as a scientist at the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Marshall W. Nirenberg (1927–2010) completed his first summary of the genetic code—one of the most significant documents in the history of twentieth-century science. This summary, now in the collections of the National Library of Medicine, is a painstakingly handwritten chart of the discovery of how sequences of DNA, known as “triplets,” direct the assembly of amino acids into the structural and functional proteins essential to life. Dr. Nirenberg would go on to win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1968 for this work, sharing the award with Robert W. Holley of Cornell University and Har Gobind Khorana of the University of Wisconsin at Madison “for their interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis.”

This spring, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) will host a public program—A Tribute to Marshall Nirenberg—to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of this scientific accomplishment. The event will be webcast on Tuesday, March 17, from 10:00am to 12:30pm (Pacific). The event will also be free and open to the public, in the NLM’s Lister Hill Auditorium, Building 38a, on the Bethesda campus of the National Institutes of Health. More information about the event and a list of speakers are available on the NLM website.

Learn more about Dr. Nirenberg, his work, and his accomplishments at NLM’s Profiles in Science website and in a recent post on the NLM History of Medicine Division’s blog, Circulating Now. Throughout 2015 NLM will continue to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of Nirenberg’s discovery through additional posts on Circulating Now.

NIH Manuscript Submission System Refresh

The NIH Manuscript Submission System (NIHMS) got a refresh this week. The NIHMS system supports the deposit of manuscripts into PubMed Central (PMC), as required by the NIH Public Access Policy and other participating funder (Howard Hughes Medical Institute). Are you a librarian who serves an NIH funded investigator or project? If so consider skimming through the NIHMS FAQStep-by-Step Tutorials, and Glossary.

From its Overview page:

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) developed the NIH Manuscript Submission (NIHMS) system to facilitate the submission of peer-reviewed manuscripts for inclusion in PubMed Central (PMC) in support of the NIH Public Access Policy. Since its inception in 2005, NIHMS has expanded to support the public access policies of other organizations and government agencies (for more details, see the Funders List). The NIHMS system allows users, such as authors, principal investigators, and publishers to supply material for conversion to XML documents in a format that can be ingested by PMC. Depositing a manuscript in NIHMS for inclusion in PMC is a multi-step process, requiring an author to approve the deposited files and associated funding before conversion and the PMC-ready version after conversion.

NLM Launches New Twitter Stream for K-12 Science Educators

A new NLM Twitter stream with resources for K-12 science educators can be found at: @NLM_K12

Also available for K-12 science educators is this directory of web resources from NLM’s Specialized Information Services division

Toolkit: Health Literacy and Health Insurance Literacy

[Press Release from Alliance for Health Reform]

Despite new private insurance coverage over the past year, many people do not understand the very terms and concepts necessary to make informed choices, according to recent studies. A new Alliance for Health Reform Toolkit, “Health Literacy and Health Insurance Literacy: Do Consumers Know What they are Buying?” addresses the extent and significance of both health literacy and health insurance literacy for Americans buying and using health insurance.

Highlights:

  • Nearly nine out of ten adults have difficulty using health information to make informed decisions about their health
  • Half of Americans don’t understand such basic health insurance terms as premium, deductible and copay
  • Thirty-seven percent of marketplace enrollees did not know their deductible, and 47 percent of those receiving subsidies did not know the amount of federal assistance they were getting.
  • The cost of low health literacy in the United States currently represents between 7 percent and 17 percent of all personal health care expenditures.

The Toolkit includes:

  • An overview of problems associated with health literacy as well as studies analyzing their impact.
  • Links to reports and news articles explaining and analyzing the issue
  • Contact information for leading experts on the issue

Contact: Marilyn Serafini mserafini@allhealth.org 202/789-2300

Produced with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

NIH News in Health Now Available

Check out the February issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Fixing Flawed Body Parts: Engineering New Tissues and Organs
    How can you mend a broken heart? Or repair a damaged liver, kidney, or knee? NIH-funded scientists are exploring innovative ways to fix faulty organs and tissues or even grow new ones. This type of research is called tissue engineering. Exciting advances continue to emerge in this fast-moving field.
  • Galled by the Gallbladder? Your Tiny, Hard-Working Digestive Organ
    Most of us give little thought to the gallbladder, a pear-sized organ that sits just under the liver and next to the pancreas. The gallbladder may not seem to do all that much. But if this small organ malfunctions, it can cause serious problems. Gallbladder disorders rank among the most common and costly of all digestive system diseases. By some estimates, up to 20 million Americans may have gallstones, the most common type of gallbladder disorder.
  • Many Older People Take Anti-Anxiety Meds Despite Risks
    Despite known risks, older people often take benzodiazepines, a class of drugs that helps treat anxiety and sleep problems. New research raises questions about why benzodiazepines are prescribed so often when safer alternatives may be available.
  • Treatment for Alcohol Problems
    An estimated 17 million Americans have an alcohol use disorder. But research suggests that only a fraction of them seek professional help. No matter how severe the problems may seem, most people can benefit from some form of therapy.
  • Featured Website: Find a Cancer Center
    NIH’s National Cancer Institute (NCI) supports specialized cancer research centers that deliver cutting-edge cancer treatments to people in communities across the country. This interactive map can help you find an NCI-designated center near you and learn about its patient services and research.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Governor’s Guide to Mass Evacuations

This guide was prepared to help governors and other state leaders prepare to play their roles in disaster response in advance of an emergency that involves mass evacuations. The guide covers important elements such as knowing the extent of authority, coordinating with nonprofits and volunteer organizations, establishing shelters, training, and reentry issueshttp://www.nga.org/files/live/sites/NGA/files/pdf/GovGuideMassEvacuation.pdf

Samuel Benson

Director of Emergency Management Operations

Emergency Management~Enterprise Resilience

NYU Langone Medical Center

Samuel.Benson@nyumc.org

Disaster Information Roles in Humanitarian Response

Recently two blog posts were published on the various roles humanitarians play during disasters.  Both of these posts provide details of work done by humanitarians that make use of disaster information management skills.  One post includes an infographic that details the types of skills a humanitarian data scientist needs, such as data management, humanitarian business, information management and more.  This post ends with a link to free Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) that corresponded to the skills listed in the infographic.

The second posts focused on the work digital humanitarians are doing in the response to the Ebola outbreak including verifying, updating and geo-tagging mapping data.  Take a few moments to read these blog posts, and consider how your skills fit with this work.

Librarians Talk about Using Altmetrics

Library Journal and Plum Analytics are hosting a webinar about modern metrics.  There is growing interest in altmetrics and people are hungry for stories about how people are using them.  Many institutions are utilizing new metrics to help showcase research, do analysis, bring value to their institutional repositories and more.  This webinar features users telling their stories about what they are doing with these modern metrics.

Topic:  Practical Uses of Altmetrics

Date:  Wednesday, February 11

Time:  1:00 pm (ET)

The speakers for this webinar are:

  • Robin Champieux – Scholarly Communication Librarian, Oregon Health & Science University
  • Tim Deliyannides – Director, Office of Scholarly Communication and Publishing and Head, Information Technology, University of Pittsburgh
  • Andrea Michalek – President & Co-Founder, Plum Analytics

For more information go here.