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NLM Resource Update: How Can NLM TOXMAP Be Used by Native Americans and Other Populations?

Although TOXMAP is not specifically designed for any one particular group, the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program and Superfund Programs can be of interest to specific populations such as Native Americans by helping to find sources of chemical releases and contamination in locations of interest to them.

In the beta version of TOXMAP, click on the “Zoom to Location” icon, enter “reservation” or “rancheria” into the “Address or Place” search box, then click “Zoom to.”

In TOXMAP classic click on “Zoom to a Place”, enter “reservation” or “rancheria” into the “other place name” search box, then click “Submit”. You can also overlay US Census data by race: “American Indian and Alaskan Native” (1990) or “One Race: American Indian and Alaska Native” and “Two or More Races Including American Indian and Alaska Native” (2000).

For more information, see the TOXMAP and Native American Populations page.

My NCBI – ORCID Author Data Integration with SciENcv

SciENcv users will soon be able to create SciENcv profiles using the data stored in their ORCID records. By linking an ORCID account to an NCBI account, users will be able to create SciENcv profiles using the personal statement, education, employment, publications and research awards information stored in ORCID records.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/so14/so14_sciencv_orcid.html

NLM Resource Update: Environmental Health Student Portal

The National Library of Medicine Environmental Health Student Portal has added Mercury and Your Health, an animation about the uses of mercury and how exposure can impact human health. The 16-minute video introduces children to mercury and its basic properties, discusses mercury exposure routes, outlines health impacts of mercury, describes mercury containing products, discusses mercury contamination in the environment, outlines the proper disposal of mercury containing products, discusses bioaccumulation and mercury contamination of fish, and describes additional sources that children could use to find credible health information on mercury.

The Environmental Health Student Portal connects middle school students and science teachers with free, reliable, and engaging environmental health education resources. The Student Portal offers a diverse array of engaging educational materials such as videos, games and activities, lesson plans, experiments and projects, fun challenges, as well as additional resources for further reading. Mercury is one of the chemicals covered in this resource.

NCBI RefSeq Release 67 Available on FTP

The full RefSeq release 67 is now available on the NCBI FTP site with over 61 million records describing 45,166,402 proteins; 8,163,775 RNAs; and sequences from 41,913 different NCBI TaxIDs. More details about the RefSeq release 67 are included in the release statistics and release notes. In addition, reports indicating the accessions included in the release and the files installed are available.

To subscribe to the ncbi-announce mailing list, visit http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mailman/listinfo/ncbi-announce.

Elegantly Simple Evaluation: Documenting Outcomes of a New England Health Literacy Project

NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center New OERC Blog posting! This is to let you know that a new OERC Blog article has become available. You can find this article online here. For simplicity’s sake, we’ve posted the article below:

For an example of an elegantly simple program evaluation that yielded great results, check out an article by Michelle Eberle and colleagues in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine New England Region, which appeared in the August 2014 edition of MLA News . The article describes the region’s Clear: Conversations project, a collaboration among five organizations in which librarians and health professionals taught health literacy skills to patients. This innovative project, originated by Health Care Missouri, featured role-plays of patients in which they practice good patient communication skills during a visit to a health care provider (played by volunteers from various health professions).

This project shows that a few relatively simple evaluation activities can clearly show the positive outcomes of a project. For example, after their role-play, participants gave high ratings to their satisfaction with the information they received during their “doctor visit.”   When completing the multi-session program, a strong majority said the program improved their comfort with employing effective communication techniques with their own health care providers. More than half of respondents completing the second questionnaire described specific actions they intended to use in future visits to health care providers. Also, the health professional role-players provided their own feedback about how their experiences would affect their own interactions with patients.

The evaluation methods used for the Clear: Conversations project were fairly simple, but well-planned. Eberle and her colleagues developed their evaluation methods in the project planning stage and consulted with the NN/LM OERC on method design. As a result, the team was able to collect information that clearly demonstrated, both to themselves and others, the value of their project.

The OERC would like to highlight more examples of evaluations that are both effective and relatively easy to implement.  If you know of other projects that we can showcase in our Elegantly Simple Evaluation series, please contact Cindy Olney at olneyc@uw.edu.

Job Ad: Scholarly Publications Librarian, Hempstead, NY

The Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine seeks a qualified candidate for the position of Scholarly Publications Librarian.  The Health Sciences Library serves the information needs of all faculty, students, and staff of the School of Medicine and develops services in collaboration with the other Hofstra University libraries as well as the libraries at the North Shore-LIJ Health System.  The successful applicant will have responsibility for working closely with faculty and administrative staff to implement databases and support scholarly publishing initiatives promoting the academic mission of the institution.  The position will report directly to the School’s Associate Dean for Library Services.

The Scholarly Publications Librarian will implement a continuously updated and comprehensive faculty publications database for the School of Medicine and the North Shore-LIJ Health System, building upon the existing annual publications database.  Analyzes and reports on the impact of the institution’s scholarly publishing using multiple bibliometric and data sources at both the individual faculty and departmental level, developing standardized metrics of success for academic scholarship in collaboration with appropriate stakeholders.  Collaborates with Information Technology and Academic Affairs staff as well as faculty to develop and maintain a website interface for scholarly publications integrated with faculty Bio’s.  Promotes the academic mission of the School by effectively displaying in publicly accessible and discoverable formats the academic scholarship of the faculty.  Provides assistance for faculty writing and publication, including medical education research, by development of support materials and instruction in the use of tools for improving scholarly output.  Educates and assists researchers to improve compliance with government policies and mandates on public access reporting.  Educates and assists faculty and staff regarding copyright compliance issues.  Develops plans for potential implementation of an institutional repository including options for dissemination and preservation of the full text of scholarly works as well as data management.  Provides reference and literature search services as needed to supplement reference and education staff.  Participates in scholarly activities with other library staff including potential research or grant funded projects.

Qualifications:

Graduate library/information science degree from an ALA-accredited institution, or equivalent, and a minimum of two years professional library experience, preferably in a science-oriented academic or research facility.

Demonstrated expertise in searching bibliographic and citation databases including PubMed and Web of Science as well as utilization of citation management applications.  Demonstrated ability and interest in working collaboratively with faculty, research staff, and information technology staff.  Proficiency with Excel or other spreadsheet platforms.  Demonstrated expertise in developing web content.  Familiarity with the NIH Public Access Policy and compliance tools.  Excellent oral and written communications skills as well as presentation skills.  Evidence of initiative and flexibility in implementing projects whether independently or as part of a team.

For consideration, please email cover letter and resume/CV to:  SOMDeansOffice@hofstra.edu

Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.  Hofstra offers a competitive salary ($60,000 minimum) and excellent benefits.  For more details about the library and Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine visit our website at:  http://medicine.hofstra.edu

Hofstra University is an equal opportunity employer, committed to fostering diversity in its faculty administrative staff and student body, and encourages applications from the entire spectrum of a diverse community.

Check Out the Latest Issue of the MAReport

Health & Wellness @ the Library: The Essentials of Providing Consumer Health Services

Presenter:       Lydia Collins, Consumer Health Coordinator, NN/LM MAR

Dates:               September 22, 2014 (1 month)

Where:             Online

Details:             http://nnlm.gov/ntcc/classes/class_details.html?class_id=661

Summary:  This course defines the core competencies of providing consumer health information services and then dives directly into the essential skills and knowledge that library staff need to build those competencies. The course starts by preparing you with tools to learn the demographics and health status of people in your community.

 

Objectives: Learners will be able to: Explain the concept of consumer health and how the library helps to build healthy communities. Explain the difference between literacy and health literacy. Feel comfortable and confident providing health reference to diverse users. Understand the ethical and legal issues about providing health information. Evaluate the quality of health information in a variety of formats, and teach users how to recognize the elements of trustworthy materials and the warning signs of dubious health information. Identify and choose authoritative health information resources that are appropriate for particular users. Apply criteria for collection development of consumer health materials. Plan health-related programming and events.

 

Important Note: This course has been certified for 12 contact hours of Medical Library Association (MLA) CE credit. If you are taking this course for MLA CE, there are specific requirements to satisfy the 12-hour instruction requirement. The coursework also provides everything you need to qualify for Level 1 CHIS – the Consumer Health Information Specialization from MLA. Please read the document MLA CE and CHIS – Course Requirements for all the details.

Finding Health Services Research (Focus on NLM Resources session)

MAR offers 1 MLA Continuing Education (CE) credit per session—details will be provided at the end of the session.

Presenters:

  • Lisa Lang and Patricia Gallagher, National Information Center on Health Services Research and Health Care Technology (NICHSR),  NLM

 

Date / Time:  Tuesday, September 23, 2014 / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Where:            https://webmeeting.nih.gov/nlmfocus/

Online / No Registration Required

 

Summary: Health Reform. Comparative Effectiveness. Quality Improvement. Population Health. PCORI. HIE. ONC. Disparities. Accreditation. Evidence-based public health practice. Both in classic resources and grey literature, these and other topics are among the current foci of health services research. Join Lisa Lang and Patricia Gallagher, of the National Information Center on Health Services Research and Health Care Technology (NICHSR) of NLM, in a broad yet tool-oriented presentation on the NLM’s resources in support of health services research. The presentation will acquaint both new and experienced visitors to NLM with the web portal Health Services Research Information Central (HSRInfo Central), as well our specialty databases for research in progress (HSRProj) and datasets for HSR (HSRR). Learn about how we can keep you informed of new and important grey literature in this evolving area as well as our structured PubMed searches, and expand your understanding of resources related to health information technology and public health systems and services research.

How to Navigate the Information Maze to Access Disaster Health Information (Lunch with the RML session)

Presenters:

  • Siobhan Champ-Blackwell and Cindy Love, Disaster Information Management Research Center, National Library of Medicine

 

Date / Time:  Thursday, September 25, 2014 / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Where:            https://webmeeting.nih.gov/lunch2/

Online / No Registration Required

 

Summary:  Knowing where to find reliable and authoritative information on a timely basis is key for all preparedness and response activities. Critical information is highly scattered across many diverse sources and can be difficult to find. In this webinar, representatives from the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) will provide a review on how to navigate through the information maze to efficiently access the best information possible from both government and non-government sources.