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Archive for the ‘Technology’ Category

NCBI Homepage Update: Action Buttons and Category Pages

Friday, March 13th, 2015

The NCBI homepage has six new buttons on it: Submit, Download, Learn, Develop, Analyze, and Research. Each of these leads to an action page devoted to a particular set of services. These action pages allow easy access to the pages and resources you need to complete tasks. For instance, you can: Find information about the Entrez API; Find an upcoming NCBI webinar, Find an NCBI tool that designs PCR primers, and much more! On the new action pages, you’ll also see six categories in the header: Literature, Health, Genomes, Genes, Proteins, and Chemicals. These category pages highlight useful databases, tools and resources for each of the topics all in one place.

Also included is a blue Feedback button on the left side of the Download, Learn, Develop, and Analyze pages so that you can send comments to NCBI. More information about the new homepage will be released on NCBI News and to the blog, NCBI Insights.

What Shapes Health? A Story about Data Visualization

Friday, March 13th, 2015

This week on National Public Radio’s (NPR) All Things Considered was a story of what happened when Dr. Nancy Hardt, an OB-GYN, used data from Medicaid birth records to see where children were born into poverty in Gainesville, FL to try and identify ways to intervene and prevent poor childhood health outcomes. She was surprised to see a 1 square mile high-density ‘hot spot’ of births in dark blue appear in her map above. Dr. Hardt was encouraged to share her map with Sheriff Sadie Darnell, who pulled out a map of her own of Gainesville.

Sheriff Darnell’s map showed an exact overlay with the ‘hot spot’ on Dr. Hardt’s map of the highest crime rates in the city. By visiting the area they identified many things in the community that were barriers to good health including hunger, substandard housing, and a lack of medical care facilities – the closest location for uninsured patients was a 2 hour bus ride each way to the county health department. You’ll want to check out the rest of A Sheriff and A Doctor Team Up to Map Childhood Trauma to learn more about a mobile health clinic, what data from additional maps showed, and other steps they have taken since to help improve health outcomes for the community.

This story is the latest from the NPR series What Shapes Health, which was inspired in response to a recent Robert Wood Johnson Foundation poll about what beliefs and concerns Americans have regarding health. You can read an overview and download the full report of their results at

Geeks Bearing Gifts: Unwrapping New Technology Trends

Friday, March 6th, 2015

Presenter:           Missy Harvey, Technology & Communication Coordinator, NN/LM MAR

Date / Time:       March 23rd and 30th / 2 – 3:30 pm (ET)

Where:               Online


Summary: Audience: Health Professionals, Information Professionals. This class is a fun, fast-paced, and informative update on today’s hottest technology trends.  Content will be presented with a “can-do” focus intended to encourage participants to investigate at least one technology for implementation in their institution.  4 MLA CEs.

MAR Announces the Winter Issue of the MAReport Newsletter

Friday, March 6th, 2015

We are pleased to announce the new issue of our newsletter, The MAReport. We have a nice range of topics in this issue.  We want to highlight the interesting “Member Spotlight” article by Valli Hoski.

What is Big (Crisis) Data?

Friday, March 6th, 2015

Save the Date! NLM’s Disaster Information Management Resource Center (DIMRC) will have a very special presentation at their April 9th webinar from Patrick Meier, PhD. Patrick is an internationally recognized speaker and thought leader on humanitarian technology and innovation.  He will talk about being a digital humanitarian which is the subject of his recent book entitled “Digital Humanitarians: How Big Data is Changing Humanitarian Response.”

Patrick is currently the Director of Social Innovation at QCRI where he both develops and deploys unique next generation humanitarian technologies in partnership with multiple humanitarian groups.  Among his many accomplishments, Patrick co-founded and co-directed the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative program on Crisis Mapping and Early Warning and served as Director of Crisis Mapping for Ushahidi.  Ushahidi made major contributions during the Haiti earthquake response through deploying its innovative crowdsourcing platform.

Patrick has received a numerous awards and recognitions for his work, including being named as a National Geographic Emerging Explorer.  Read more about Patrick at

This webinar will be presented live through Adobe Connect and recorded for future viewing.  More information about logging into this webinar will be posted at:

Data Visualization Webinars from Association of Research Libraries

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

Data Visualization Webcasts to Help You Tell Your Library’s Stories

Understanding Gamification

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

Please note a new ALA Library Technology Report, “Understanding Gamification.”  It provides a great overview of this emerging technology trend.  The report can be found at:

The first chapter is available free at:


NCBI Webinar: The Next Generation of Access to Sequencing Data

Friday, February 20th, 2015

Next Wednesday, February 25, NCBI staff will present a webinar on the SRA Toolkit, a system for accessing the approximately 3.4 Petabases of next-generation genomic and expressed sequence data housed in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive (SRA). As data sets become larger, mining information and performing comparisons directly from structured databases becomes increasingly necessary. The SRA Toolkit is not only capable of dumping the data out as a fastq or sam file, but also provides direct analysis and comparison from specific genomics regions across hundreds or thousands of samples.

In the webinar, we will show examples of configuration and use of the Toolkit for both public SRA and controlled access data associated with studies in the Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP).

To register for this webinar:

Deadline Extended for Public Comments on Proposals to Enhance Transparency of Clinical Trial Results

Friday, February 20th, 2015

In November, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) released for public comment two proposals to increase the transparency of clinical trials via information submitted to, a publicly accessible database operated by the National Library of Medicine. One is a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that describes proposed regulations for registering and submitting summary results of certain clinical trials to in compliance with Title VIII of the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA). A major proposed change from current requirements is the expansion of the scope of clinical trials required to submit summary results to include trials of unapproved, unlicensed, and uncleared products. The second proposal is a draft NIH policy that would extend the similar registration and reporting requirements to all clinical trials funded by NIH, regardless of whether they are subject to FDAAA. Both proposals aim to improve public access to information about specified clinical trials, information that is not necessarily available from other public sources.

The public may comment on any aspect of the NPRM or proposed NIH Policy. Written comments on the NPRM should be submitted to docket number NIH-2011-0003. Commenters are asked to indicate the specific section of the NPRM to which each comment refers. Written comments on the proposed NIH Policy should be submitted electronically to the Office of Clinical Research and Bioethics Policy, Office of Science Policy, NIH, via email; mail at 6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 750, Bethesda, MD 20892; or by fax at 301-496-9839, by March 23, 2015.

PubMed Subject Filter Strategies Updated for 2015

Friday, February 20th, 2015

PubMed subject filter strategies are reviewed each year to determine if modifications are necessary. Modifications may include revisions due to changes in Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) vocabulary or MEDLINE journals, adding or deleting terms, and changing parts of a strategy to optimize retrieval. The following subset strategies were recently revised: